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Carb Factors (sorry not ratios)? Huh?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by destea1, Jan 20, 2012.

  1. destea1

    destea1 Approved members

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    Sorry, I keep seeing this (and read the thread about calculating *factors*) and I've honestly never heard anything about this. Typically I read the packages, measure accordingly and go based off of that for grams of carbs - or I use the new scale and it basically tells me what I need to know.

    What's different about carb factors and how important/common is it to use them? It's all new to me and no one has ever brought it up! I feel like it's way over my head reading about everyone doing this math for every food.

    Thanks in advance for dealing with what is probably a somewhat 'duh' question, I'm seriously making the deer in headlights expression right now.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2012
  2. swellman

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    How would you measure a baguette if you were to buy one?
     
  3. Flutterby

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    well, when you measure something out, how do you determin how much insulin to give based on the measurement and carb count?
     
  4. obtainedmist

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    Sometimes newly dx'd kids are on a sliding scale. Often, after a while, the endo will have you do a food diary for 3 days where you write down carbs, doses, and bg numbers before and after meals at regular intervals. From that, the endo or dietician will figure out how many units of insulin will cover how many carbs at different times of the day. For example, my daughter is 1:10 at b-fast, 1:12 at lunch and 1:10 at dinner. That is, one unit for every 10 carbs or 12 carbs. Hope this helps!
     
  5. mmgirls

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    It sounds like you are using some sort of ratio of carbs to insulin, every unit of insulin wil cover X amount of carbs, written like 1:40, 1unit for every 40 carbs.

    Maybe you mean to be asking about carb Factors?
     
  6. destea1

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    Oops sorry - this just shows how green I am - yes carb *factors* - we are on ratios, oy a whole new dictionary of terms. Sorry for the confusion!
     
  7. nanhsot

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    Carb factors are something I only use when weighing things. Many scales have a database, but some do not, or some things are not in there. I home bake breads very often and things like that are hard to figure carbs for, so carb factors come in handy.

    On a package you can find weight per serving and carbs per serving. Divide carbs by weight in a serving. That's a Carb Factor. So for example the CF for most breads is .50, so half the weight is carb.

    Once you know that, you can multiply your weight per serving by that number and get actual carbs.

    Anytime you can't find something in the database just figure the CF using the info on the package and weigh, then multiply.
     
  8. lgouldin

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    My scale doesn't have a database, nor do I say here is your 1 cup of whatever. I just measure it out ( she says how much she wants )and find the carbs using the carb factor. Carb factors are very helpful for homemade foods and if you have a scale that does not have a database. If I make a big pot of soup, I add up all the carbs that go into the soup then divide by the weight and have my carb factor. Then I dip her out a bowl of soup and multiply by the carb factor to know what the carbs are for the bowl.

    I have a list of our main carb factors that she eats on the inside of the cabinet door.:D
     
  9. L101418

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    Carb factors is just a differnent way to figure out how many carbs are in what you are eating. I use labels if available but for fresh food it is easier to use a carb factor - my guessing is not always where I want it to be.

    So for chips the label says 1oz(28g) = 15 carbs so I'll weigh out 1oz and dose for 15 carbs.

    Or you can determine the carb factor for the chips: 15 / 28 = .54 carb factor
    Then weigh out how ever much to eat, ie 35g. 35 * .54 = 18.9 carbs

    I use carb factors for baked potatoes, veggies, fruits and homemade dishes that come in all different sizes and no label. A baked potato that weighs 130 grams and has a carb factor of .21: 130 * .21 = 27 carbs
     
  10. swimmom

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  11. destea1

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    Thanks for the information guys! Definitely another good tool to have in my proverbial handbag :)
     
  12. deafmack

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    Another thing is if you use a scale with a database and a digital readout. You can input 100 grams of a food and then you will know what the carb factor is. Another way is to use the Calorie King App on one's IPhone or IPod Touch, look up a food, input 100 grams of that food and it will give the carb factor for that particular food. By the way, this App is actually from Calorie King. If one doesn't have the app, one can go online to the Calorie King Website and do the same thing.
    I use carb factors but also use the database in my Track 3 as well as the Calorie King App on my IPod Touch. Both seem to cover things pretty well. I find Carb factors seems to be more accurate for me.
     

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