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Can we have a mass phone call and facebook commentary for this Dr.?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Tamara Gamble, Aug 30, 2012.

  1. Tamara Gamble

    Tamara Gamble Approved members

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    "The findings were compared with 100 people with type 1 diabetes who utilized insulin replacement. Both groups displayed little difficulty in managing blood sugar and no complications occurred.
    redOrbit (http://s.tt/1m5sw)"

    Can you believe this guy? "Little difficulty in managing blood sugar." He's part of the Mayo Clinic. He just discredited our community and I am ticked. I am hoping that everyone will flood his office and his facebook so that a retraction is printed.


    http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/1112684480/diabetes-management-pancreas-083012/ Here's the article.

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/bio/14266458.html Here he is.

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/patient-visitor-guide/ Here is his office number in Florida if you scroll down.

    https://www.facebook.com/MayoClinic?v=wall&ref=search Here is their facebook page.

    Thanks for your support.
     
  2. selketine

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    Looking at it Tammy - I think that the statement "little difficulty" was not a quote from the doctor but an observation or analysis by the person who wrote the article. It doesn't have quotes around it that it was something the doctor actually said. I looked at the journal article and it says that the surgery patients have similar "control" as the ones with type 1 already - but doesn't have anything about it not being difficult.

    I think the article author for that website mistook the journal article's note of positive advances in insulins and delivery systems (like the pump) - to mean it was not difficult anymore.
     
  3. CAGrandma

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    Yes, saying that those with type 1 have "little difficulty" was an unfortunate choice of words. In an article where the focus is for doctors treating people with cancer of the pancreas who hesitate to remove the whole pancreas - thus turning the patients into type 1 diabetics - but leaving the possibility of a return of the cancer, I can understand what was meant.
     
  4. caspi

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    ""What we have shown here is that, due to wonderful recent improvements in insulin therapy, patients without a pancreas can control their blood sugar as effectively as type 1 diabetes patients can," continued Wallace in the statement.


    I think this is the important part of the article. They are discussing pancreatic cancer, which from what I understand is a very difficult cancer to treat. If the pancreas can be removed and replaced with insulin therapy, I think it's wonderful.

    ETA: I forgot to add that, like CAGrandma states above, he may have used a wrong choice of words by saying "little difficulty" but when you read the entire article I understand what he was meaning.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2012
  5. mmgirls

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    I beleive that there is a mom with a DD that was born without a pank here on THIS forum. While persons without a pank do have other medical issues blood glucose control is one of the most important issues that they face, also those that have to have theirs removed for other reason like accident, it is important to know that Type 1 advances are not only helping those with Type 1. These people can live a full life after just like those with T1D.
     
  6. valerie k

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    I think we have a couple of kids here born without pancreas.

    I always wondered why in the cases of prancreatic cancer, why they wouldnt remove it since you can be born without it.
     
  7. virgo39

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    I think you are over-reacting a bit -- even apart from the fact that it is a characterization of the author rather than the physician, I don't see how referring to the fact that a group of individuals in a trial did not have a lot of problems managing their blood sugar discredits any one.
     
  8. caspi

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    The article states:

    "What has confounded surgery for pancreatic cancers and precancerous cysts for a long time is the notion that if the entire organ is removed, patients will have great difficulty in controlling the resulting diabetes,? commented Dr. Michael Wallace, chair of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Mayo Clinic, in a prepared statement. ?Most surgeons try to leave as much of the pancreas as possible."

    It then went on to say what I quoted in my previous thread about the advances in insulin therapy.
     
  9. Tamara Gamble

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    Maybe all of you are right. I think it was the blue candle thing this morning. I need to stay away from those and just pray every day for the families who have diabetes. I don't have many days that I am negative about diabetes or what is said about it. It really just hit me the wrong way. I know someone who had their pancreas removed due to cancer and it has been anything but a cake walk and controlling his bg levels has been a nightmare. I guess I'm being overly sensitive to both of the issues. Thank you for your commentary.
     
  10. selketine

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    That statement WAS ridiculous -but I think it was the creation of the article's author and not from the doctor. She should have said that the cancer patients had no more difficulties typically than those with type 1 when managing BG's. That would have made more sense!:cwds:
     
  11. deafmack

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    I have friends who are Deaf and she had pancreatic cancer and passed away last Spring. Unfortunately they decided against removing the pancreas since she did not want to have diabetes. I did talk with them asked they why they thought diabetes was worse and she talked about being afraid of needles. I told them that insulin needles basically did not hurt at all or seldomly did and I showed her the needle and also the lancets, etc but they still decide against having her pancreas removed. I often wonder what her life expectancy would have been if she had gone ahead and had her pancreas removed.
     
  12. Tamara Gamble

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    Deafmack, that is so sad. I am so sorry.
     
  13. Tamara Gamble

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    Carol, The reality is that we are inventing products here in the USA that are approved for use in Europe, that we can't appear to get approved here, that would be helpful. We need a cure. This condition is tough. How do we expect the FDA to take our families seriously when some Dr. at the Mayo Clinic and an ignorant reporter basically say it's seamless. The Mayo clinic is a big deal. I realize that it's an article that is promoting hope for someone with a pancreatectomy. I just feel as though they are offering false information and it's ridiculous. Do you know that they wouldn't even discuss it with me unless I paid them or they could bill my insurance as a consult. I think that really set me off. I just wanted the information corrected. It's over now really but I can't stand it when someone takes things backwards for our families.
     
  14. caspi

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    The choice of words "little difficulty" was poor, we can all agree - but other than that I honestly think you're making too much out of this. How are they taking things backwards for our families? The article quotes the doctor as saying...

    "What we have shown here is that, due to wonderful recent improvements in insulin therapy, patients without a pancreas can control their blood sugar as effectively as type 1 diabetes patients can," continued Wallace in the statement.

    I'm confused as to your anger at this doctor..... :confused:
     
  15. Mimi

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    I think pancreatic cancer is tougher...no matter how difficult it may be to control BG after removal of the pancreas.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2012
  16. swellman

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    I guess what shocks me most is that it's a "novel" approach to consider removing the pancreas for severe diseases of the pancreas like cancer.

    If a doctor would ask me if I would consider removing my pancreas to treat pancreatic cancer I would ask "So, would that mean that I have to live the rest of my live like my child?"

    If the answer is "Yes, but the cancer is gone." I would say "Hell, yes - take it."

    I do think the outrage is misdirected. $0.02
     

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