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Can the kick Hannah off football?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Belinda, Aug 14, 2010.

  1. Belinda

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    Hi - My daughter Hannah wanted to play football for her school. She is playing with 4th, 5th, 6th graders. Yes the only girls in the history of her school. When I got approval from the athelic director, he did not realize Hannah has diabetes and is concerned about her "sweating" during practice. WTF. Kids sweat... even if you have diabetes. So now he is saying I must also attend the 8 hrs of weekly practice. Hannah does attend a catholic school. I do get what I need from the teachers with no problem, but this is new. I'm thinking they thought Hannah would bail after the first practice.. but they don't know Hannah. Hannah plays a lot of sports, baseball, select soccer, basketball, cross country, now football. She knows what to do for her diabetes. I want to be a practice, and I will be at most, but with work, I can't guarantee it. Can they kick Hannah off the team it I don't attend?
     
  2. Lisa P.

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    I doubt you'd have legal recourse but if you can't get them to work with you at the school I'd take it to the diocese.
     
  3. wvchinacat

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    maybe once they see that she is able to take care of herself, that she knows when to step out to have a gatorade and check her BG and she can keep up . . .then they will feel more comfortable with her being there unsupervised by you.

    I know when Willow started training with Gymnastics from 1 hour a week to 6-8 /week this summer the coaches wanted me there and I truly did not want to sit for 3 hours at a time with 2 other kids. SO I did for a few practices and then once the coaches saw her take care of herself and we worked out a schedule for her to come out a check and text me her numbers - it all was fine. I think for our coaches - they did not want the extra responsibilites of having to remind her.

    Good luck - I'd try to work with them . . . Go Hannah!
     
  4. fredntan2

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    there was a girl on my kids high school team -all four years I think-she was the kicker.

    Go Hannah!!
     
  5. Flutterby

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    I don't get the whole 'sweat' thing?!:confused:
     
  6. selketine

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    Many Catholic schools receive federal funding so they are subject to the same rules as a public school regarding the care of your child in after school activities. That might offer you some recourse.

    I think regardless, it would be discrimination to deny her a spot on the team if the reason is diabetes (whether the school is private or public). The ADA law prohibits discrimination: http://www.diabetes.org/living-with...-protections/americans-with-disabilities.html
     
  7. Mimi

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    Me neither.
     
  8. sooz

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    Many Catholic schools recieve federal funding?? Really? I didnt know.
     
  9. Christopher

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    Re: the "sweat thing", it sounds like you need to calmly educate the athletic director on the realities of Type 1 diabetes. I don't think he understands it. Hopefully, once he understands what it is and how you manage it, he will feel more comfortable having her on the team. If you are planning on being at most practices anyway, then you should be OK. Make sure you attend the first couple, put them at ease, then if you miss one or two it shouldn't be a big deal. Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2010
  10. kim5798

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    your attendance may have to do with being a girl, not diabetes. I know from our Little League experience, if there is a girl on the team, there must be a woman present at every game, practice, etc.

    kim
     
  11. Timmy Mac

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    I think the "sweating" problem the athletic trainer is referring to is that diabetics sometimes don't sweat as much as "normal" people, making them more prone to heat illness. But as long as she stays hydrated it shouldn't be a problem. I've done marching band for 4 years and nothing says "heat illnesses" more than standing at attention for about 5 hours.
     
  12. Mimi

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    Really? I've never heard this before. Why would diabetics not sweat as much in the heat?
     
  13. Becky Stevens mom

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    I know I was gonna say, what does sweating have to do with diabetes? Boys sweat too right, whether they have diabetes or not.
     
  14. Timmy Mac

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  15. Mimi

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    Okay, but I'm not really sure that was what the coach was referring to in regards to a 10 year old girl that wants to play football.

    I'd still like to know what the coach meant by it.

    As an aside, article where "a small study" is cited but no other information on the study, # of participants etc - I don't give a lot of weight to those. Not to say that it is not entirely possible - it does make some sense.
     
  16. Timmy Mac

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    yeah, i'm not sure if that was what the coach meant either, but this is the only logical one i could think of... if it isn't this then he could use some educating.
     
  17. Belinda

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    The coach thought if she sweat a lot, her blood sugar would drop. Some people refuse to understand. I finaly just told him to manage the sport and I will manage the diabetes. Out of the 30 boys out there today, 12 were sitting out because it was too hot... Hannah never gave up. I did disconnect her pump and her BG went up.. :confused:.. I thought for sure it would go down.

    And yes our school does receive federal funding for the lunch program. That is how I'm able to enforce the 504... put that really didn't take much.. actually nothing. I listed what I wanted and they said OK. :)
     
  18. selketine

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    In this case they cannot make a parent stay to watch your child for a school sponsored after-school activity.

    Regardless - the school is NOT allowed to prohibit her from trying out for or being on the team - they have to give her the same consideration as the other kids.
     
  19. OSUMom

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  20. StillMamamia

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    I think you may want the endo to write a note explaining that the sweat thing is a non-issue in your child's case. Not sure if the endo will be on board with it, but can't hurt to ask. I think having something which comes from someone else besides the parent may calm them down. Doesn't make much sense to me all this talk about th sweating issue - the highs or lows will be handled appropriately, so where is the isse, really?

    Good luck.
     

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