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Calling your child's endo “my endo” etc.

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by C6H12O6, Aug 3, 2014.

  1. C6H12O6

    C6H12O6 Approved members

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    Calling your child's endo “my endo” etc.

    I noticed a few people do this. I find it kind of a curious phenomenon. Its does not seem to be all that common, but I come across it from time to time.

    I had speculated that it may be more of an American thing because parents are often paying a portion of the cost or for their coverage, however, I just came across a video where a British women refers to “my diabetic nurse” but its her kid with diabetes.

    I've never heard anyone say "my vet." maybe it just rolls off the tongue easier but why not just say "the endo."

    I am just curious why some people say “my endo” etc.
     
  2. MomofSweetOne

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    I may do this, so I'm trying to think. What comes to mind is that "our endo" works with both of us as I'm still actively involved in management of T1, that there are many endos in the area & practice so saying "our endo" differentiates where we got the advise (and advice DOES differ. I got chewed out by one (not ours, thankfully) for being too dangerous with a target of 110 for nights & our new endo wants it dropped to 100), and also indicates perhaps a better working relationship of the team? Do you have choices in medicine & who you see? We do, and when the hospital switched our team, it was a rough year for lack of a good match in styles. I'm not sure either of us would use "our" for that relationship, and I'm glad we had the option to switch because of the effects it was having on my daughter.

    We also tend to say "we" got an A1C of X.X because at my daughter's age, we are partners in T1 management. I couldn't achieve a tight A1C if she weren't on board, and she will be the first to tell you that she doesn't yet want the full-time responsibility of everything. So, it is "our" A1C, even if it is her hemoglobin being scored and mine hasn't been tested for a couple years. I don't know if that makes any sense, but it's how we roll around here. Life was simpler in the days that her pancreas managed the A1C itself. Then it was completely her A1C and will be again in the future. ;)
     
  3. C6H12O6

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    “We” and “our” makes sense to me. Its just my that strikes me as odd.

    A theme identified a lot in qualitative research about the lived experience of parent's of kids with diabetes is that parents grow to feel like the diabetes is their disease , but they articulate this very clearly in the interviews, and are very conscious of it. Actually, it seems to be kind of a sore subject (for the participants) from the way the author's present it.

    I feel like the “my endo” thing is almost said by accident and just goes unnoticed by the speaker or writer.

    In Canada, for specialists you can pretty much choose. Family doctors is more complicated mostly because there is a shortage.
     
  4. MomofSweetOne

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    Just out of curiosity, are you referring to comments by Dave? I remember thinking something in either his video or website was really odd the way he phrased it and that it almost presented as if he were the one with diabetes rather than his son, far more than the "family disease" perspective.
     
  5. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Here it's, "the endo" and "the A1c" and fwiw, "the vet".

    I do however fairly often mistakenly say that I, "took maddie to the vet" when I mean pediatrician. Animals outnumber children here - not so surprising
     
  6. caspi

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    As long as you don't actually take Maddie to the vet, I think you're fine. :tongue:
     
  7. mamattorney

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    I think I say our, too. Not always, but sometimes. Although if someone was looking for a vet reference, I think it would be fine to ask "what vet do you use?" and I would answer "we go to Glendale Animal Hospital", so at least it's pervasive. I find similar "ownership" with many people and their favorite sports teams - we won, we lost, who are we playing, etc.
     
  8. C6H12O6

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    Well, Dave says “my doctor” (I am guessing you have noticed that on facebook posts) which I find curious. He says "my doctor" in reference to whoever is treating his kid's diabetes. I really don't know what that is all about. Maybe it is like that episode of Seinfeld and they are in fact taking the kid to a vet. If it were true we'd be told “ he's in the 89th percentile for height, so you have no right to question it.”

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXeV5cqb_3Y


    (Joking aside, I feel like the “my doctor” thing is Dave's way of being evasive and there is more to that story.)


    But it was actually a video I posted in reply to another thread that made me think of it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BjAXZXri5Lo. Because she says “my diabetic nurse.” I have only really seen those to instances of the use "my." The "our" makes sense to me, and pediatric clinicians are trained to meet the social and psychological needs of parents as well as their kids.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2014
  9. valerie k

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    depends on the conversation at hand. Its usually MY vet, because I picked the vet the animals see. So when telling a story about the vet or passing on any useful information, I would say "my vet" says to, my vet did, my vet can..... tell you this, my vet has a better bed side manor then my dr does.... wish I could see her.
    cant really say how I use the term DR for matt, or how I term the endo. aside from here, I don't talk about matts dealings with the dr.
     
  10. olearyck

    olearyck New Member

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    I find myself talking about '<child's name>'s endo' but 'our nurse educator.' I think this is because my child with diabetes is under 5, so the nurse educator is educating me, not the child. However, her endo is a doctor and is treating _her_.
     

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