- advertisement -

benefit of starting insulin sooner in type 2??? Question for a coworker.

Discussion in 'Adults with Type 2' started by Kaylas mom, Feb 6, 2011.

  1. Kaylas mom

    Kaylas mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2010
    Messages:
    1,306
    I am not sure I will get much response here since this seems like a slow forum. I have a coworker who does so much to control her type 2 D. She counts carbs, takes oral pills, exercises and eats healthy but still has high numbers.

    She asked me the other day if I thought she should start insulin. I didn't really know. Her dr keeps telling her it is the last resort but it seems to me that it would put less stress on her body and would be helpful.

    Anyone have studies or thoughts on this??
     
  2. kimmcannally

    kimmcannally Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2010
    Messages:
    1,356
    No study but it seems to be endos who deal with type 2 seem to see it as a failure if insulin is needed. I think if she needs it, she needs it. No one sees it as a failure for our type 1's to be on insulin. I know that type 2 can be controlled by diet (sometimes, usually?) and maybe that's why people seem to feel like they have failed if they have to start insulin.
    Insulin isn't a dirty word - it's something everyone needs :)
    Just my 10 cents worth (inflation you know)
     
  3. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    5,560
    She probably needs her medication adjusted.
     
  4. Joretta

    Joretta Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2009
    Messages:
    528
    I think it matters what she is considering high. My endo said if I go over an A1C of 6.5 I get insulin. Funny thing is I check my BG and never get a reading above 120 and my A1C is at 6.1.
     
  5. CAGrandma

    CAGrandma Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2006
    Messages:
    530
    When I was diagnosed with type 2 about 9 years ago I was told that unless I started exercising, losing weight and eating right my diabetes would progress until I had to have insulin shots! There was no doubt in my mind that this was in the nature of a threat - and I saw it as such until my grandson was diagnosed with type 1 about 5 years ago. Suddenly having an insulin shot wasn't that big a deal. (Or at least I couldn't admit that I didn't like shots).
    I'm convinced that doctors try to avoid insulin at almost any cost because so many people freak out at the thought of having to have shots. When I've discussed it with my doctor he starts with the usual "I think we can avoid insulin at this time" until I remind him that my grandson has type 1. He still hasn't put me on insulin, but his attitude changes dramatically.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice