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Band trip. Night checks

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by Bigbluefrog, Dec 9, 2010.

  1. Bigbluefrog

    Bigbluefrog Approved members

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    What would you do? My dd is going to be staying in a room w 4 girls, and we normally do night checks for high excitement and high activity days.

    Since Disney will most likely cause lows, we will need to chk her bg....I really just want her to be able to fit in....and not make this an issue.

    I could sneak in the room and do a check....not! Have her spend the night in our room and get an idea what to expect. NOT!

    Sigh....no matter what, there is no way to take the d out of our trip.

    It gets worse, she has a back brace that is uncomfortable, at night she sleeps on foam bed roll to help make it more bearable.

    Any help much appreciated....and hopefully the roomates will understand....

    Honestly D is easier to deal with than scoliosis....the brace is a pain.
     
  2. Nancy in VA

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    They are allowing 4 children and no adults to stay in a room? I'm really actually pretty surprised by that. Disney is allowing that? I really would have expected an adult in the room.

    I would expect at her age she can wake up to an alarm - can she set an alarm and check and text you. You could meet her at the door if she needs something, or go bang on her door if she doesn't text you within, say, 10-12 minutes of the expected check (meaning she snoozed and didn't get back up)
     
  3. Bigbluefrog

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    That is a great idea!

    NO adults in the rooms, this is very common for HS trips, they do have a night security guard watching the rooms from the hall.

    Your HS has adults in each room?
     
  4. Amy C.

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    Have her go to bed higher than you usually expect. When 12, my son could wake up at night when he knew that no one else would. Set an alarm to help her wake up.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2010
  5. nanhsot

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    My teen recently stayed in a hotel room with his football team (well, some of them anyway!). He set an alarm and tested at 2am, no problems.
     
  6. Bigbluefrog

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    an alarm going off at 2am is just as annoying as a mom coming in to check.

    I will have her explain to her roomies.
     
  7. Nancy in VA

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    Unfortunately, she has diabetes so those are her options if she wants to be in the room with the other kids. As much as she would like to NOT have this burden, she does - so you are giving her options and she has to choose the least objectionable of them, but not checking overnight isn't an option.
     
  8. chbarnes

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    I feel your anxiety. Chris is supposed to go to Disney with his show choir in March. He doesn't want us to go and absolutely no alarm clock exists that will wake him at 2am. We are going to do lots of dry runs after performances close to home.
     
  9. emm142

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    I disagree. Many, in fact I would go as far as to say most, adults and older teens with T1 do not check their BG every night. There was a recent thread about it in the adults with T1 section, actually. If I was staying in a room with other people I would not want to set an alarm which would wake them up. I would lower my basal or eat a snack and make sure my BG was over 180 before I went to sleep (if I were not wearing the CGM).

    This wouldn't be something I was comfortable with doing every night, since it would mean running my BGs higher than I'm usually happy about. But for a few nights, I would be comfortable doing it.

    All I'm saying is there is an option with overnight tests, especially in unusual situations (although maybe less so with younger children; I've only experienced D from 14+). You really need to weigh up the potential risk of her friends being irritated at her for waking them up every night against the risk posed by not checking BG overnight.
     
  10. Nancy in VA

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    The child is 14 years old in an environment that will risk lows - the risk of friends being irritated is being weighed against DEATH :eek:- seriously, this child is 14 and I would not for one minute put the risk of her being embarassed in front of her friends above protecting her life. Sorry, not gonna happen. This is non-negotiable.
     
  11. emm142

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    I've been 14 years old with type 1 diabetes. I know what my experience of diabetes at that age was like. Honestly, it's not exactly up to you to decide what is negotiable and what isn't, and I'm just giving the OP my opinion, not telling her what she should or shouldn't do.

    As we all know, YDMV, and I don't think any of us should suppose we are qualified to tell one another what is and isn't negotiable, especially when their child is a different age and in different circumstances than your own. You are using emotive language to try to make your point better, but the risk of death is negligible if an effort is made to run her BGs (just a little) high on the nights she is there.

    One day, 14 year olds aren't with their parents anymore. One day they will be out and trying to care for themselves the best way they can, and will need to be able to tell the difference between negotiable and non-negotiable for themselves. There is NO WAY, no chance whatsoever, that a 14 year old with D will never miss a night check, even on a night after activity, or alcohol, or an unpredictable dinner. It's best to avoid burnout wherever possible, and when you're a teenager something like this could easily start brewing up into burnout.

    I'm thinking about long term consequences. You seem to be focusing on the short term here. If she checks overnight on these few nights she might have slightly better range BGs on these few nights. If checking poses a real problem, it is possible that checking might also trigger a burnout which could cause an absence of night checks for many, many nights to come.

    The OP knows her daughter's own situation. I'm just trying to give my perspective. And my perspective is that there is a choice here.
     
  12. selketine

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    My guess is that Nancy meant that she would tell her child - if in the same situation - that the blood check in the middle of the night would be non-negotiable considering the circumstances.

    As for alarm clocks - I think if the situation is that the child would need to check in the middle of the night - then an alarm clock is not THAT big of a deal. If the other kids know what will happen and why then they will likely be able to ignore it for the most part and go back to sleep if it wakes them up.

    There are alarm clocks made for not disturbing others (or for the hearing impaired) that shake - if you do a google on "silent vibrating personal alarm clock" you can see there are several - like at amazon.com - for not too much money. Might be worth a try.
     
  13. cindyrn6617

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    Ryan had a trip back in the spring to Williamsburg VA...I went and stayed in the room with him and 3 other boys. Two of them were his friends that had spent the night at our home and the third his parents were ok with it. Now, I had to check during the night because all the walking caused MAJOR issues all day and most of the night. That's with a 90% decrease in the basals during the day! The kids understand, it is what it is. Ryan could go with a parent or stay home end of story. We went and he had a blast, I was exhausted!

    Our band does Disney trips too and he would not be allowed without a parent...Here's why...120 kids, not enough chaperones that are trained to closely watch a child with a medical condition. Not worth the risk...best of luck and hope the trip is wonderful!
     
  14. emm142

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    I just wanted to apologise if my earlier post was overzealous at all. I didn't get much sleep last night and I seem to be overreacting to things today. :p In my own experience of D, if I'm above 200 without any IOB at bedtime and a temp basal of 80% of normal, I've always woken up between 150 and 250.

    Obviously that is just my experience, and I think everyone here is able to make a judgement about in which situations their child would be safe beyond reasonable doubt.
     
  15. chbarnes

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  16. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I agree with this 100%.

    I never ask Maddie to check her bg overnight when she's on a sleepover. Instead she had learned not to eat and bolus with 2 hours of going to sleep, to check before bed and call me and to sleep with juice box, tabs, tester, phone and a little flashlight next to her bed.

    It's about adapting and learning to actually manage in the real world. It's about letting go.
     
  17. cindyrn6617

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    Ryan does a lot of activities that he has to manage on his own...he did marching band this year (we stayed in the stands, didn't follow him on the bus etc), he is doing wrestling now and practice ( we aren't with him)...he does well 90% of the time without us. But, there are certain times, a parent must step in and help him. A 90% decreased basal and still in the 40's or less at Williamsburg...well, you can see where that was going.

    A few weeks ago he was low and had no idea what he was saying or doing and scared us to death. We try to let him be a typical teenager and do as much as any other teen. There just are times, we get slapped in the face by D that tells us otherwise.
     
  18. emm142

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    Obviously, if I was hanging out in the 40s, I would test my BG more regularly.
     
  19. nanhsot

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    I agree with you. And I want to add that the things I believed passionately would happen when my children were older...don't always happen. My daugher was NOT going to wear mascara before she was in high school, 8th grade at a minimum. For example. Ha. Truth be told that in all things teenager we have to pick our battles, and what I hear Emma saying is that battles must be tiptoed around sometimes or you risk a bigger problem. Better, to save night time checks for when there are issues, for example.

    I know this has been talked over and over on this board, but I don't night check my teen except and until I HAVE to, and not on a regular basis really because of what Emma refers to above. When we make big changes (like now, transitioning to pump) then I pull out my mama card and insist. When things settle into a routine (which has happened for him, thankfully) I only do spot checks to reassure us both that he's doing OK.

    On his recent trip he was only 4 days into pumping, was running high a lot, so frequent testing was a condition of the trip. I knew he wouldn't run low, in fact was much more concerned with ketones and highs. I asked him to test frequently and asked if he would mind setting a 2am alarm. The guys he was bunking with didn't even wake up when he pulled out his site and had to change it in the middle of the night.

    A lot of trust happens when you let them make some of these decisions.

    I guess my bottom line is that each family has to judge what their own parameters are. I think it's reasonable to ask your child to test if you are concerned, and reasonable to make it a condition of the trip if there are safety concerns and risks involved. I also think it's reasonable to trust them not to test if they have good hypo awareness and overall good judgment about their diabetes management.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2010
  20. Bigbluefrog

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    We have a unique situation, my dd does drop low with excitement, then add a day of walking around. She could go to bed at 180 and still drop to 40 if she had a busy day. She is not good at waking up especially if low, no cgm here :( We do have better results with the pump. That temp basal is amazing.

    All the band kids know me, as the band mom, so its not really too big of a deal, but like some of you say...its good for them to be independent and I really want her to have the say in this..with safety first of course.


    I want to let her be independent but be near by as a safety net. I would like this trip go smoothly and I like hearing what others do in the situation.

    I was thinking setting a alarm and have her text the numbers is a great way to make sure everything is ok. Some may prefer no alarms and sleep through the night, and I just come in with a door key and do the checks w a flashlight...no alarms.

    If all else fails and its just a rough night I can just pull her into our room.

    Give an example, she was getting ready to do a parade, bg 160, I left for a bit and next thing parents are calling for me, Ambrea is low, bg 50, gave her glucose candy 3 tablets...15 min. later 43, more 3 more tablets, and I went to get soda...15 min later 48...drink a soda (50 g of carbs) She was marching in a few minutes.. bg finally 70....right before parade..120 ..at the end of parade 180...

    That is how excitement and D goes for us.
    Some excitement worries for a Band trip going to Disney World.
     

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