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Babysitter for a two year old with diabetes?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Blue, Aug 30, 2010.

  1. Blue

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    Could you clarify this question, please? Is what that the babysitter has no training?

    If you mean my over-protectiveness, then I will freely admit that it was well established way before the situation I am asking for opinions about! :)
     
  2. virgo39

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    I don't think you are particularly over protective at all. If it was me, I think I'd want to know how others handled this same issue, too.

    My question was because your original post referred to no training by the diabetes team and a later message referred to no training. So I was wondering if the babysitters you were considering (whether adults or 14-years old) had not been trained at all or had simply not been trained by the diabetes team?
     
  3. Blue

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    The babysitter situations I am asking opinions on is/was a situation where the choice is out of my control (blended family).

    My choice would be team trained caretakers if at all possible, and if not then a fully trained (shots and all) adult.
     
  4. DylansMama

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    We leave our 3 year old with our 16 year old niece who we trained. We found that she actually did a better job of following instructions than the grandparents did and she didn't have the hang-ups about testing or injections that others did. She had a more open mind to dealing with things and we had a great experience. I think it really depends on the people involved and what you feel comfortable with. We pre-measure foods for any caregiver, so carb counting is not an issue as long as they give what we have provided.
     
  5. Jen_in_NH

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    My son was diagnosed at 20 months, and is now 3 1/2. My husband and I were trained by the endo and CDE, however, no one else that cares for him was. My parents watch him quite a bit for us - my dad is type 2, and my mom is a retired RN, so the idea of checking and bolusing wasn't that far out for them. We've taught them carb counting, and how to treat lows and highs. They wouldn't be able to change carb ratios, etc, and don't like having to change pods, but can if they need to.

    DH's cousin also watches him, and we taught her to check him, bolus as needed, and how to treat lows and highs. We have one other kid that babysits, but that's more for an hour or two, when we're close by. She does not know how to check, just knows what symptoms to watch and will call us or 911 if those happen (we're across the street at the Fire Department when she's watching him, so I'm not too worried about that one :D)

    I think it has everything to do with your comfort level. My parents are the only people who watch him overnight, and I still wouldn't want to be more than a phone call away.
     
  6. PatriciaMidwest

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    I don't know if I could rely on a teen babysitter for a 2 year old. It would have to be a very special person that I felt very comfortable with, knew the parents, had been around d before, etc.

    You are right, all babysitters need to be trained. I don't think they need to be trained by the endo, though. I feel I would do the best job training someone on my child's particular needs, which the endo's office could not do. They would be giving a canned lecture on basic diabetes care, which you could easily replicate and then customize your child.
     
  7. virgo39

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    Sorry, just now saw your response. I guess I don't see the "team training" as critical -- and I don't think it would obviate the need for your own "this is how we do it" training, especially with a two year old. I don't think it is necessary to train someone to give insulin unless they'll be babysitting for a time that requires them to do that ... but can see that you might feel a lot more comfortable if someone did have that training.

    I can totally see why you would want an adult, but a responsible young person may be able to provided the needed care. Are you able to discuss care issues with the babysitter or perhaps provide the Pink Panther book (or its shorter version) as a reference?
     
  8. Abbysmom

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    I have a toddler, this is what we did

    When I was new t this I had my mom and sister trained. It turned out to be a pointless except for the fact that my Mom should feel comfortable calling the hospital in an emergency. The fact I do not care for my daughters diabetes exactly the way the hospital teaches.

    We know what works for her and what doesn't and after we began making our own adjustments which was shortly after the class I had to reteach anyways.

    I do and feel quite comfortable leaving my daughter with sitters I have trained. These people range from her then 9 year old sister (with an untrained adult in the house) to Grandma and my own friends. It really just depends on the caregivers willingness to learn and ability.

    Now you should know that my babysitters are ony capable of checking blood sugar, treating a low, admistering glucagon (we have never needed it), counting carbs and doseing with a pump or shot when we were on shots. They call if there are other issues and only my husband and daughter correct a BG without a call or change a site. No one programs the pump or makes adjustments but me.
     
  9. Andreea

    Andreea New Member

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    babysitter

    I know any detail about a child diabetic life... I was in this situation and now I am in a good health with many years of diabet type 1,with insulin and blood sugar control daily...
    After that years of diabet(from 12 years old)I have a healthy girl,7 years old...
    Now,when my mother can take care of my daughter,I can take care and supervise all the time a child with diabet,a child who can comunicate with me,for can keep his glicemies in a good level every day!
    I am teacher,but the salaries in my european country are so low...
    I prefer to apply what I know so well,to take care of a diabetic child,not to work like teacher for few money(in Romania the teacher salaries are like for poor people in rest of Europe)...
     
  10. Nancy in VA

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    I'm probably in the minority here. My daughter was diagnosed at 2 and she was left with babysitters shortly thereafter. I was in a babysitting co-op. I trained everyone on doing a fingerstick. They could check a BG and call me (I had written down low treatments and let the highs go a little). I had two women who were nurses in my co-op so I went over injection procedures with them for the few times I had to leave her for a meal.

    Once she went on the pump, there were a couple more comfortable with it. I typed up procedures on how to operate the pump and walked them through it once and we were on our way - they called when it was time to dose but I had wanted them to see it once with me and then I talked them through it over the phone.

    The only person I have ever trained on Glucagon was her preschool teacher. I honestly wouldn't expect a babysitter to use it - I would expect a call to 911.
     
  11. Amy C.

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    Here is another one in the minority. I left my then 3 year old son with a teenage babysitter almost immediately.

    I trained the sitter on what to do and what to look for. At the time, we could schedule being out and about inbetween shots. They don't need to know everything, just enough to deal with what is likely to happen during the time they are watching the child.

    I think that most parents train the caretakers for their child on the routines used in the house -- this is just another one.

    I continued this on to train the teachers and staff at my son's schools. The endos offices simply do not have the time or resources to train all the adults involved in the life of a newly diagnosed child.
     
  12. Lee

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    Removed because I got it all wrong.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2010
  13. Blue

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    Hi Lee :cwds:

    I'd like to point out that this thread is from the end of August and was resurrected by someone looking for a babysitting job.

    The teen in question was not responsible and proved this by letting the toddler receive rather severe burns. Not diabetes related exactly, but enough of an issue that it is court ordered now that only (informally) trained adults are to be responsible for his care.

    I do appreciate your perception, though. Divided families are tough!
     
  14. Abbysmom

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    Yes

    I haven't read the whole thread but I do leave my daughter with ther sisters who are 16 and 10. The 10 year old actually does an excellent job on her own as well but only for 30 minutes at a time without meals.

    I have used teenage sitters I trained my self for a couple of hours without a meal involved. But I am confident I could teach a teenager to take care of Abby for longer.

    Honestly I don't think an adult is going to be any more or less capable of checking blood sugar and bolusing than a 14 year old. Its a matter of how confident I am in training them and wether they are teachable.

    My biggest concern would be attention span and endurance over a long time, like a full day of care. I see where an adult would be better at long term sessions.
     
  15. Lee

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    I am so sorry - stuffing my foot in my mouth and backing away!
     
  16. Jessica L

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    My daughter is 10 and pretty good at self care but I dont see being able to leave her with a untrained sitter. Heck I have not let her stay the night at her cousins house cause I have not been able to train my one sister in law. The other I did but even so only use them if I HAVE to or really really need a break. Then again I have more than my T-1 daughter to worry about when they are watch or stay the night some place.
     
  17. Heather(CA)

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    It seems to me that what your asking is whether your stepson's mom should be leaving him with a babysitter that was not trained by the diabetes team at his doctors office. It is my understanding by you that you have your step-son every other weekend. She is more likely in this situation to need child care at times.

    Seth was dx'd at 7, but none of his babysitters were ever trained at the doctors office, I trained them. The mom should be able to train a babysitter to take care of her son for periods of time. It doesn't really matter whether they know how to give a shot or not as long as it's a short period of time in between when the next shot would be necessary.

    As far as a 14 year old, I suppose it would depend on the 14 year old more than the age. There are 14 year old that are very responsible and 18 year olds that are not...

    Does that answer your question?:cwds:
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2010
  18. Heather(CA)

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    She is dad's house. Blue is the step-mom.
     
  19. Blue

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    I appreciate the perspective and think the advice is relevant no matter which "house" I am! :cwds:
     
  20. Lee

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    I removed my quote becuase I got Blue confused with someone else and was laying it on thick.
     

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