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Attention problems?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by MEVsmom, Oct 28, 2013.

  1. MEVsmom

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    My daughter has been diagnosed for 3 months. She is 8 and in the second grade. Over the past couple of weeks she has gotten to where she cannot keep her attention on any task for more than a couple of minutes. It's not just school work, although that is the worst. It's everything. You can ask her to brush her teeth, she'll get distracted 5 times along the way and then get distracted right in the middle of brushing. She is on NPH and Humalog. The only change we have made is to add a lunch time dose of Humalog becasue she was running so high after lunch. The problems are all day long though.

    Is this a common issue? :confused:
     
  2. danismom79

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    Common for an 8-year-old? Sure. Wait 'til she hits the teens. If this is totally out of character for her, you may want to get her evaluated. How is she distracted/what is she distracted by?

    If this is independent of her bg, I would resist the urge to pin it on diabetes. It's an easy scapegoat, though, especially in the early months.
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I would be more inclined to put it down to the transition to being Type 1 at the age of 8, just before starting 2nd grade (which can be more of a leap than K-1st) than to having Type 1.

    I think we sometimes forget how emotionally stressful a diagnosis can be for kids, even when they seem to be adjusting. I'd give it time and work on helping her stay on task before jumping to any conclusions.
     
  4. MEVsmom

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    My husband is a psychologist who used to work with kids, so believe me, he doesn't slap a diagnosis on anyone. If you ask him a great majority of kids diagnosed with ADHD are just being kids. I really don't want to pin it on anything, just trying to get to the cause of this sudden change. We are ten weeks into school and 12 weeks into diagnosis, so neither thing is "brand new."

    I think she likes to blame things on diabetes. She has already learned that trick and we do not fall for it. I will say, she is missing a fair amount of class time while we are in the process of getting everything sorted out. She is in an academic gifted class so any time she misses can really have an impact on her grades.

    It's just so frustrating!!!
     
  5. danismom79

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    Oh. Ok, then. You seem to be further along than I was at 3 months past dx (it sure was still brand new to me), so ignore what I offered. Good luck.
     
  6. MamaC

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    Respectfully, and with no professional credentials to support this...I'd be cautious about any possible association to Type 1.

    I'd also counsel two other things: respect for the changes the T1 diagnosis has imposed on your daughter, and openness to and flexibility regarding the unexpected.
     
  7. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Ok. Well, sounds like you've got it covered.

    Good luck.
     
  8. mmgirls

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    when you say high, can you give us an idea on the BG #'s?

    While my kiddo does not show many signs of distraction or impairment of cognition there are many that say that BG above 250 to cause an issue.

    You said you had to add a fast acting dose to lunch because her number were high and most likely had been high the entire time up until that lunch shot. And if that lunch shot is doing the trick then her BG would be falling at a pace that she is not used to with NPH.

    Also It took months for my daughter's body to "recover" from the onset of T1D

    But I do have to say that when my DD was second grade if I wanted her to get anything done it was a constant reminder system, she learned allot about natural consequences that year.

    In regards to her missing class time and it having an effect on her grades (they give grades in second?), if that is happening then you need to have a 504 put in place that wil allow for the proper accommidations to be placed so that the school works with your child's diabetes care needs into her acedemic day.
     
  9. danismom79

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    I don't recall seeing you much on the forums before now, so I looked at a few of your past posts. Perhaps some of this is catching up to her?

    http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showpost.php?p=848604&postcount=7

    http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showpost.php?p=849440&postcount=14

    That would stress me out and affect my behavior, and I'm in my 30s.
     
  10. missmakaliasmomma

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    I do agree that her diagnosis at 8 years old is probably pretty hard but I know that when my daughter starts to act funny and not be able to pay attention in school, it usually is because of diabetes. I believe she is feeling the insulin start to work fast and she has a steep drop back to her target BG. Nevertheless, it has her "feeling low", even if she doesn't know it, we can see it.

    On a side note, I believe the same thing as your husband. People are way too ADHD diagnosis happy. Most kids are nuts and don't like to pay attention lol. Back to D though, we had a horrible time with NPH. It's an insulin you have to feed because of timing, the problem is that timing could always be off. We were very happy when we switched to lantus and I would never want her back on NPH.
     
  11. MEVsmom

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    Thanks everyone. I do realize it is alot of adjustment. It just seemed to come out of the blue over past couple of weeks, but I guess it probably is just hitting her that this diabetes thing isn't going to go away. The newness has probably worn off. With all that she deals with associated with her sister's illness, sometimes we expect her to be 18 when she is 8 I guess. Hopefully we can get to the root of the problem and get her back on track.
     
  12. MomofSweetOne

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    I agree with this, but for my daughter, we see it happening at numbers above 200. She's really off and can't focus. She's told me that her vision is affected by then as well. Once she drops to 170, she is her typical self. We try hard to manage spikes as best as we can as a result.

    What others said about early puberty & forgetfulness....so true! Their hands can be on the pump, all carbs counted, BG entered, and they still forget to bolus. It's unreal until you live with it. Although, I will say, in our house, we experienced far more bolusses with forgetting to eat until G4 alarmed than missed boluses. She'd get busy after prebolusing and completely forget about eating. This diabetes is a nuisance, is it not?
     
  13. Beach bum

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    But, it is brand new. 12 weeks is still the accepting, learning phase.

    Kids trying to blame things on diabetes is probably as old as diabetes. 8 years in, my daughter will still try and pull that one. We just remind her that while we know she sometimes has trouble controlling her actions, emotions when low or high, it's not acceptable.

    I'd pin it on her being 8, the fact that she has a chronic illness that at times she feels like she has no control over her emotions or body, realizing that it's not going to end. Diabetes does play a part, and you'll need to be alert to BG's/behavior patterns. There are times when my daughter can be 50 and functioning without any impairment, but then she can be 70 and she is totally out of it. Same with highs. You just never know. So, this isn't unusual. Some kids feel BG's more than others, some feel the slightest change.

    Keep in mind she is 8 and she's just recently been diagnosed with T1 diabetes. It's a lot for a little kid, no matter how mature they are to handle. Think of it, she's probably the only one in her class who has it. It's not like glasses where at least she knows she has someone else who she can relate to. If it were me, my mind would probably be wandering too.

    IMHO, I think that is the root of the problem. Plain and simple, she's realized diabetes sucks.
     
  14. missmakaliasmomma

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    I'm just curious to know whether you have ever felt a high or low BG yourself? Since I have had some issues (not very often) with low BG's (only in the 50s though), I do know how it feels and I couldn't control the way I felt and I'm an adult. I can't imagine how my daughter feels when she's in the 40's since, when I was 55, I could barely function. I was shaking, cold while in 95 degree weather, had no color in my face and just plain felt horrible.

    I have no problem excusing my daughter's behavior when she's being "bad" and then I test her and she's low. In fact, I apologize to her for getting mad at her while she's low because I truly think they can't help it. It explains a lot. The lows and highs change the way they act, I really don't think it's something that should not be "acceptable" It's truly a sucky feeling. I'm proud that my daughter can keep some of herself together while low, because I sure as hell can't.

    To the OP, like I said, you're not alone, my daughter has trouble paying attention when high or low too.

    What I can suggest to help those spikes is to prebolus. My daughter has the same breakfast every morning now- almond flour pancakes and an apple. We prebolus about 20 minutes. She hasn't risen more than 30 points so far past the starting BG since we've started doing it. Alot of it has to do with food choices too. If she's eating a lot of processed food, her BGs and spikes will be a lot worse than if you cook things that are made basically from scratch, or as healthy as possible.
     
  15. wilf

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    It might be time to think about moving on from the NPH. It is a tricky insulin to get right, and if she's already getting Humalog at lunch then there's no benefit at all to using the NPH.

    Switching to a Lantus based regimen may help with both her blood sugars and also her attention issues.

    Good luck! :cwds:
     
  16. MEVsmom

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    That is the plan at our appointment on November 19th. That's our plan at least and I don't antipate any issues from the endo. I guess they are just trying not to make a major change until the appointment time. I do wonder if the CGM is not just making us crazy sometimes, knowing exactly what is happening all the time, but at the same time we love it :)

    As for the pre bolusing, I do the best I can, but it is so difficult. Since one of her issues is time management, I already allow almost an hour for her to eat breakfast and yes, sometimes it takes that long. If I get her up 20 minutes earlier, it's just more of a struggle . At lunch, it would just mean her missing even more class time and she's already falling behind because of the attention problems and periodic lows. She's really a good eater and her dad is a health nut, so it's not a ton of processed foods. I think timing is just more the issue and the NPH. We have definitely got some work to do. We had a come to Jesus meeting last night about everything so we'll see how it goes from here.

    I cannot wait for November 19th :)
     
  17. wilf

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    Ok so when you meet on the 19th I'd also talk about using Apidra, which may help with the need for prebolusing. It is a faster insulin, and we often give it to DD during after a meal without seeing much of a spike.. :cwds:
     
  18. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Is the hour long breakfast ordeal a long standing thing or a post dx thing?
     
  19. Beach bum

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    Actually, I have. And it feels crappy.
    But when she's yelling at us, slamming things, throwing things, we know it's not the norm for her. We do take that into consideration, but once she is treated and back in range, that is when we remind her that it is unacceptable. We tell her that we know that it's hard to control emotions when high or low, and while she does not get punished, but we do expect an apology.
     
  20. MEVsmom

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    Post diagnosis. She used to just have a Pediasure Sidekick and then eat breakfast again at school if she wanted. Breakfast at school is something white, processed and not good for you. sucking down the Pediasure took 5 minutes. We have given Glucerna Shakes a try once or twice, but to be honest I haven't paid much attention to what it did to her becasue it was pre-Dexcom :)

    She's always been a pokey eater though.
     

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