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Article in a local newspaper regarding banning food rewards in school.....

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by caspi, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. caspi

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  2. Flutterby

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    It sounds as though she used her child's T1 to do away with a food issue that wasn't necessarily an issue for him, but all the kids.. why are they using food so much as a reward? Kids enjoy new pencils or erasers just as much as they'd enjoy a tootsie roll. It doesn't say it in the article but I have a feeling there was much more going on in that school with this child than this food reward thing. The mother went to the ORC and while she was at it she went after the food issue. Then after fighting pulled her kid from the school.:rolleyes:
     
  3. caspi

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    I agree, there has to be a lot more going on. I guess my biggest concern is what is this child going to think as he grows up - that the world is going to revolve around him? Our kids are going to face issues and it's how we, as parents, handle those issues that set the mark for our kids.
     
  4. jessicat

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    As a first grade teacher and the mother of a first grade diabetic, I don't really agree with banning food treats. A teacher should be able to manage using them sparingly and appropriately accommodating those who can not partake. Food and treats are a reality in life and diabetics need to live in that real world. This year I have students with dairy/egg allergies, so I try to choose occasional foods without those ingredeints. I have also happily made special arangements with the parents and students involved. My son's teacher has chosen to use nonfood items this year, however by no means did I encourage or suggest it. I willingly provide alternatives for my son and his teacher. Tangable rewards and food rewards whould be used sparingly anyway. just my thoughts!
     
  5. caspi

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    My thoughts exactly!
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2012
  6. emm142

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    I don't really agree with food as motivation. Using it very occasionally as a reward seems a little different from using it as a motivation. But whatever, I do not think that it is a diabetes issue and I think that it is best for all concerned if the two things are kept totally separate.
     
  7. Mary Jayne

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  8. PixieStix

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    I think this is ridiculous. Like it or not, food is everywhere in our society, & kids with diabetes, allergies, etc are going to have to learn that the world is not changing to accommodate them. A news story like this supports the notion that poor diabetic Bobby can't have sweets, so let's not invite him to play or he'll ruin it for everyone.

    At my 1st grader's Winter (not Christmas or even Holiday) Party I signed up to bring the drinks. Only beverage allowed was water, in order to accomodate a couple of kids' allergy needs. Really? A mom couldn't send in whatever suited their kid's needs & let the other kids have a Caprisun or Juicy Juice? I am the mom of a T1 and thought it was irritating. I did ask my daughter why & she knew exactly which kids made it so the Christmas "party" was pretzels and water. Woo hoo.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2012
  9. mmc51264

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    I taught school and I never had food rewards. i hated picking up the wrappers LOL. Some teachers go a little nuts with the candy. Zach goes for some social skills help and he gets some sugar-free gum sometimes. I just hate all the food parties that HAVE to be after lunch b/c the cafeteria might not make its money.

    I had a teacher tell me that I had forbid Zach to eat pizza at school (it's ont he menu every other day) I said they had to stop class pizza parties as rewards then. Principal had no idea. Not ONE week later, I got a notice that Zach's class had won a pizza party LOL. I try to get him to take his lunch, but he gets pizza every so often.

    Everything in moderation :D
     
  10. caspi

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    Bingo! I guess my biggest issue is that as parents we try our best to educate the public that Type 1 Diabetics can eat what others eat and here is this mother wanting a food ban.
     
  11. Flutterby

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    I totally agree.. I don't like seeing candy being used as a reward ALL THE TIME. but occassionaly, there is no harm.. and I wouldn't have used my child's t1 to do away with that either. If I was that against it I would have gone at it as it being healthy overall, not an issue because my child had t1. Sounds like this parent was just fully pissed off at the school (she said he was unsafe, and for the OCR to be involved they must not have done a 504, or followed it) and went after everything she could.. but then she pulled him out.. that just baffles me.
     
  12. Beach bum

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    That's my feeling. It's OK to use them, but do it in moderation. The kids will appreciate it so much more, and it will motivate them to try even harder.

    I think this following statement just shows that there is much more going on, and I don't think the whole story is being told:

    she is now homeschooling her son after his experience as a 5-year-old kindergartner at Hilda J. Barbour left her worried about his mental and physical health.
     
  13. thebestnest5

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    I agree.:cwds:

    <Sigh> My two cents.:cwds: I was thinking this was a symptom of a newly dx'd parent who was hurting, scared and angry. I know I thought we were going to have to make more changes when L was first dx'd. I found out that was the wrong thing to do and I know I have a happier more well-adjusted kid BECAUSE I didn't freak out about food that was not in my control. In the beginning, it felt like if I could just manage everything well...then she'd have great numbers. But, striving for those great numbers all the time, doesn't necessarily help kids have the best outlook on living with T1.
     
  14. Becky Stevens mom

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    Yes! Exactly this! When Steven started pre-school at the elementary school the passing out of candy as rewards was firmly entrenched there. I did speak to the nurse about it and it was discussed with the members of the health team at the school who were responsible for writing up the health and wellness policy. They decided that they were going to discourage the use of candy as rewards and substitute pencils, erasers, stickers and even extra computer time as rewards. It was never mentioned that this had anything to do with Steven or his diabetes.

    Ive never thought it a good idea to be giving children candy during the day where the sugar is going to be sitting on their teeth all day causing decay. And with obesity problems in children becoming epidemic we need our school systems to be on board with teaching our kids that they dont need food or candy as rewards for doing well academically
     
  15. thebestnest5

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    Yes, but in this case, it's about the mother making the issue of food about diabetes and not about the general health. That's the issue. We say that kids with diabetes can eat a regular diet--but when a parent of a child with diabetes makes food the evil enemy of diabetes--it really becomes convoluted. Then, you see people say things like this: "You shouldn't eat that candy--shame on you!"

    and

    Now, it's going down in the history of that school that all treats are gone forever because of a kid with diabetes. It sends the wrong message about T1 diabetes to many people.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2012
  16. Christopher

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    Yes, but for me, the other issue here is the knee-jerk reaction by the school board or whomever decided that the best way to deal with this Mother's complaints was to ban ALL treats, ALL the time, in ALL cases. To me that is an innapropriate and short sighted response. I think a more measured, realistic approach to treats in the school would have been much better.
     
  17. thebestnest5

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    I agree with this as well.
     
  18. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    We didn't have food or items as rewards in school when we were growing up, a good mark was reward, and you worked hard, or you failed!
     
  19. Becky Stevens mom

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    Oh absolutely! I do wish that parents wouldnt go to that extreme unless the school is really unwilling to change their policies. Most schools are very willing to work on health care policies that include feedback from the parents and staff. Steven's school had already started discouraging things like that before he even started pre-k. They also discourage the kids bringing in alot of sweets for birthdays but they havent banned it and I dont feel its necessary.

    We did have an issue with one staff member who was rewarding the kids with candy. Steven did a really good job in her class one day and in front of everyone she said " I dont think you can have candy but you did a good job today, want a sticker?" He didnt want a sticker, he wanted the candy (He was 5 at the time) and came home and told me in a very sad voice that he could have brought the candy home with him
     

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