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Are you having better luck with the new pods?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by missmakaliasmomma, Nov 19, 2013.

  1. sincity2003

    sincity2003 Approved members

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    Our OmniPod start has been very, very rough. Like, I want to take every single one of them out in the driveway and run them over with my car, rough. We had to fight to have an entire box replaced because every one in that box, without fail, fell right off his body within 24 hours. We still have to do things I don't think anyone should have to do to get them to stay on (he's very, very active and we accept that, but it's just one more step in the many things I have to do every day to make sure it stays on him).

    Now, having said that, I can't imagine going back to MDI full time. He went on it last Saturday evening so that DH and I could go out. I didn't think it was fair to the babysitter to have to check him every 2-3 hours like we do. That's the other thing. On MDI, we were checking him once when DH got up for work at 2:30 to 3am. With the pump, and before the CGM, we were up every 2 hours. That might be with any pump, but our only experience is with OmniPod.

    Out of 30 pods, including those that fell off within 24 hours, we only had one bolus failure (with .5 units left) and they replaced that, no questions asked. We had one where something went wrong with the insertion and it really hurt him. Were shots easier on US (the parents)? Sure. Were they easier on him? No way!

    The other thing you have to remember too....if a pod fails, or falls off, or whaterver, and it doesn't make it the 2 to 3 days, you lose all the insulin in it. That's been a little frustrating and after the first week, we never put more than 125 units it it because we were losing so much that couldn't be replaced.

    As far as the "click" when the cannula goes in...my son said the worst part is the noise it makes because he doesn't feel it when it actually goes in.

    good luck in whatever you decide!
     
  2. nanhsot

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    Interesting perspective. It's no one's dream to have their kid on a pump, seriously it's more of a nightmare, but that's because of diabetes, not the delivery method.


    I wonder how much your observation of adult T1s is aversion to pump vs aversion to change. I think sometimes it's just easier, particularly as an adult, to go with what works. Pumps were being developed when these adults were diagnosed, and clearly there have been leaps and bounds in technology just in the past few years. Easier to stay with what you know than try something new, particularly the older you get. Though I do know a 60ish y/o man who recently switched.

    I know quite a few adult T1s and it's about 30/70 shots/pump, so I do know more who pump than who remain on shots. Truth is that pumping does give you much more flexibility. I would definitely choose a pump if I were diagnosed, no question, though I am very sensory challenged so I know it would take some adjustment I also know that I'd not want to be lugging needles and insulin vials around with me everywhere either. Truth be told, diabetes is dang inconvenient no matter how you look at it so you just have to make the best decision you can.
     
  3. Brenda

    Brenda Junior Member

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    Just wanted to say that almost all the adults I know who have type 1 are pump users.

    Are the adults you know afraid to pump? Have they tried it and gone back to shots?

    I think that, with today's insulins, you can get decent control on MDI. It is probably easier for an adult, not that I'm saying it's easy by any means. Diabetes in younger children is just not that easy.
     
  4. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Yup - every Type 1 adult I know is using a pump.
     
  5. miss_behave

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    I'm a type 1 adult and have been pumping for 8+ years. I would never ever go back to injections. I'm a nurse and sometimes my meals consist of pretty much inhaling some food in 2 minutes in the kitchen. I can just whip out my pump, punch a few buttons and off I go.

    I really hope your obvious dislike for pumping doesn't discourage your daughter from making the decision to pump when she is older if that is what she wants. The flexibility certainly made my teen years much easier and I'm glad my parents supported my decision in choosing which treatment worked best for me.
     
  6. 3kidlets

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    That's my father in law. Type 1 for 35 years and will not pump. He is afraid of pumps. He seems to think that the pump will just administer insulin on its own. Up until 2 months ago, he was still on NPH and regular because that's all he knew. I blame his ridiculous dr though who let him go on like this. He inquired about lantus and novolog when Hana was dx. The dr said he was so controlled there was no reason to change anything. Seriously. This man spends a great portion of his day hypo. And I'm talking seriously low. He is hypo unaware. We finally insisted he look in to the g4, which he did (and his dr was clueless about). He loves it. It has completely changed his life. I guess he was feeling so empowered by that decision that he told the dr that he was switching to lantus and novolog. He sees how much easier Hana's life is compared to his. I hope he finally realizes how beneficial a pump would be for him.
     
  7. missmakaliasmomma

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    1 tried it and went back to using the pen. This particular person works with my husband and is about our age. He said he didn't like the pump. I lied though (not meaning to), one person I know is on OP actually. I think she likes it. She switched to pumping after years of not taking care of herself and has multiple health issues- including gastroparesis- because of it. Another one doesn't want anything attached to her to make it "obvious" that she has diabetes. She was dxd at 16 though and has remained a little "non compliant" for lack of a better term. She uses a pen. All the people we know are about our age.

    My daughter right now doesn't want to pump. There was one time where she peed in her pants because she was afraid to drop the pump in the toilet so it took her longer. I think that scarred her a little. She hasn't had an accident in forever.

    When she's older, I only hope that if she decides to pump again, it will be smooth for her. Maybe it will be easier when she's more in charge of it than me. Whatever makes diabetes easier for her to live with, I'm ok with. Pumping was not easier for her though, at least the first time around, because we had a lot of issues. She had to have more site changes, was high more often, stuff like that.

    We do have pretty good control on MDI. MDI with apidra is better than pumping with humalog- BG wise. So pumping for control's sake (right now) is not really what I'd want my daughter to use it for- More for convience when she's older.. and to get through puberty.
     
  8. mmgirls

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    If you do try pumping again I think you need to have the pump there but not, have it placed so that it does not have to be held on to or removed for the potty or for dressup. My dd never actually touched her pump for anything, unless it slipped out while doing a rollover or something. Unless she was wearing a tanktop typ of outfit no one was the wiser and the POD is actually way more visable and out there then when she was on the PING 24/7.
     
  9. mmgirls

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    we have only been on the new PODs since this summer. never used the old ones.

    We have only had a few screamers, Id say maybe 4-5. Recently we had one tat failed in priming and that was a first.

    I personally have a love hate relationship with the POD, I find them harder to rotate because they areso much bigger than a "site". They only last 3days +8hrs, and sometimes I am not the best about thinking about that, or we had to change it for some reason but the expiry time we forget about.

    We have to use remover and my dd has been know to go to school with two pODs becauseI did not have remover with me or we both plain old forgot.

    I prefer being Untethered pumping as we had better numbers than the POD seems to give us doing the same thing.
     
  10. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I'm not sure I understand your focus on pumping. Your daughter is 5 - you recently tried pumping and didn't care for it and say that it's not really something either you or your daughter is interested in except perhaps when she is considerably older. By then who knows what will be on the table. in five or more years it could well be a completely different range of options.
     
  11. hawkeyegirl

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    Really, every time you bring up an issue about your daughter's time on the pump, it just drives home the point that you didn't want to succeed. I mean, solving the problem of her being afraid she would drop the pump in the potty is just absurdly easy. At age 4, she takes her cues from you, and it's not hard to imagine why she didn't like pumping. I just hope you haven't turned her against it for life.

    If you think pumping would be better for her, you need to get over your issues and make it work. If you think MDI is better for her, stop obsessing about the pump and go on with life. MDI is a perfectly fine method of insulin delivery, and I'm sure over half of T1 kids in the U.S. use it. This board skews pump-heavy, but this board is not a representative sample of T1 kids or families.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2013
  12. nanhsot

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    Your daughter is too young, really, to know what she wants, and she's taking her cues from you. I've yet to see you post an issue with pumping that wasn't fairly easily addressed, and trust me you are not the first nor the last person to have a really rocky pump start. Our pump start was HORRIBLE and it lasted months too. But once it got worked out, it's been the best thing since sliced bread. We had highs, we had several site changes in a day, we switched insulins, changed basals, changed I:C, practically stood on one leg with an index finger out one window before it all clicked.

    Pump start is difficult for some, and some more than others. Don't expect next time to go smoothly, you are setting both of you up for failure. It was several months before we figured it out. I wanted to run that thing over or toss it out a window. Hated it.

    Issues are something you just have to work through, one by one. Some are easy, others harder. Worried about dropping: Get a spibelt or other tote that attaches to her. I can't say I ever see the tubing on my son, it can be very discreet. Clearly with a young child you will have to see it to mess with it, but it's all easily tucked in and hidden. The concept of a pump making diabetes more obvious is actually the opposite to me personally, it's much LESS obvious to just push a few buttons than pull out a pen and inject.

    You seem to be a little obsessed with pumping quite frankly. You feel a need to inform everyone how much you hate it but then join in on many pumping threads and ask about different pumps. If you have chosen, as you say, to continue MDI, just be content with that and move on. If you want to pump, I would not purchase a new one, make what you have work for you. Trying a new one now would just reinforce your resolve to hate it, IMO.

    Whatever you do, you need to project a sense of confidence to your dd. She's taking her cues from you and you can alter her opinion easily with your own attitude. Again, just IMHO.
     
  13. ecs1516

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    For the whole worry about "dropping the pump in the toilet" just get her a spibelt or pump wear belt and problem solved. Mine have been on pumps since 23 months old and the older one 4 years old.
     
  14. Melissata

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    If any of the diabetes decisions were up to my husband, they would still be doing what they did at diagnosis. NONE of the changes we have made were easy. Pump starts are hard. Although the Omnipod was the easiest, since she had three different tubed pumps before that. The first CGM she had was difficult at times, the Navigator, but it gave us so much insight into what was actually going on. Problem is even if you get Medicaid to say yes to a CGM, which is highly unlikely, you will not find a supplier that will sell it to you, because they will LOSE money. The Omnipod is considered a disposable pump, and that is why you can't get coverage for it with Medicaid or Medicare.

    In my opinion, it would be a huge mistake for you to even think of getting another pump for your daughter anytime soon. It will likely turn her off to pumping forever. I still regret the fact that we could not get coverage for a pump when my son was interested in one at age 15. I really think he could benefit from one, but has no interest in them now. He does wear the Dexcom 24/7 though, same as my daughter. For him, living alone, that is the most important thing for my peace of mind.
     
  15. missmakaliasmomma

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    Very true. There could be a whole set of new options in 5 years.
     
  16. missmakaliasmomma

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    Thanks to the people who actually answered my questions and didn't feel the need to reiterate my views on pumping. Yeah, I don't particularly like it but that's my opinion. Everyone can give their opinion. People ask other people's views on whether to pump with little kids and I give MY opinion, which is not representative of every single person in the world. I also usually say "most people have better luck than we did". People say they hate MDI and "would never go back", do I have anything to say to them? No. Because it's their opinion. Pumping works for a lot of people, but that's not all people and all families.

    I get that people have had issues within the same time frame that we had issues (and were able to get past them) but I was not ok with the frequent highs, lows, and just crazy numbers for those 5 months... Especially not knowing how long it would last.

    I never say "DONT PUMP" I simply give my experience. It doesn't matter if it's 5 months or 5 years, it's still our experience. Just because it didn't work for us, doesn't mean I can't give my opinion on the whole situation.

    Just because pumping didn't work this time around doesn't mean I'm writing off all pumps forever and it doesn't mean I can't ask questions about omnipod. Like I said, eventually I do want my daughter to pump again. I don't want her to go through puberty feeling crappy because of crazy BGs. If she decides in a year that she wants to pump because she's sick of shots, we will give it another go.

    The issue of pumping on this forum, seems to have the same effect of the topics of breastfeeding and vaccinations on parenting forums.

    I'm also pretty sure I didn't forever mess with my kid's views on pumping and "turned her off for life" She can make her own decisions and frequently does. If she decides in a year that she wants to pump because she's sick of shots, we will give it another go.
     
  17. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Not at all.

    I really think that people are responding not to the topic of pumping but to your insistence on discussing pumping when it's not what you do.

    I don't use the omni-pod therefore I don't post about the omni-pod. That's how it works - we post about that which we have something to contribute. And no one is looking to stop you from having an opinion, but you need to realize that at some point folks will grow weary of taking the time and trouble to engage you on the issue of pumping as you always resort to the same one note reply that pumping was terrible for you and your daughter for a laundry list of reasons.

    So feel free to post about pumping, but don't expect people to continue to engage.
     
  18. mmgirls

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    we are almost as un-tethered with the POD as you can be. She does her own shot of Lantus before bed and that is 6units right now. then the POD has a basal going of 2.80. basal as follows:

    12-1am 0.10
    1-6:30am 0.05
    6:30-1:30p 0.10
    1:30-900p 0.15
    9:00-12am0.20

    with this you can see that we can still have the variable basal ontop of the Lantus. get all the benifits of the pump, just a little more thinking, like say i want to increase overall basal I have to calculate it out and then bump up basal accordingly because the pump does not know about the Lantus.

    We do not see ketones higher than .6 when the POD has been deactivated or has come off (once on a water slide) and we don't put another one on for a few hours, even when bg was above 250 because of unbolused food.

    depending on your dd skin, changing a POD/keeping a POD may give you issues. they stick too well to my dd for the most part.

    I hate that if the POD deactivates or expires it starts screaming and continues until she getts her PDM, which she is not in charge of yet. so it takes a bit.
     
  19. nanhsot

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    We must be visiting different parenting forums! This site is nothing compared to most places I've been to when it comes to those two topics. Vitriol and hate are common, I don't see that here. I fail to see the parallels but certainly apologize for commenting on something other than your original question. Topics veer but it's good to know you don't welcome input other than what you originally asked for.
     
  20. Lizzy731

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    Didn't read all the responses but we did have a very rough start with the new pods and had many failures. But the second shipment we have had no issues and now opening the 4th box. We are receiving a third shipment today so I'm going to start using those right away to see if those have the failure issue and most likely will raise holy hell to have them replaced if they have issues.

    I have heard that the sensitivity issue has been fixed straight from the mouth of the director or research and development of Insulet Robert Campbell (I was insistent on getting an answer months ago and was conferenced in a call with him). So we will see.....
     

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