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Applying for college...tell of Diabetes?

Discussion in 'Diabetes and College' started by kateuhl, Mar 20, 2008.

  1. bgallini

    bgallini Approved members

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    If she gets an offer, can they take it back if they decide they don't want her for some reason? If that's a possibility, I wouldn't tell them about D yet. But if, as I suspect, once the offer is made it's hers if she wants it, then it might make sense to talk to the coach and tell them about her D and then take the reaction into consideration when deciding which college to go to. She won't want to deal with a coach who is going to be difficult. So if she's getting many offers, this may be a way to eliminate some schools.

    But if there is a school she really wants to go to, for reasons other than the sports, and she gets an offer from them, I'd just tell her to accept it and then talk to the coach once she starts working with them. This will also give her time to learn more about D and how it will affect her so she can educate them about it better.
     
  2. Scribe

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    i went through grade school, middle school, high school, college and grad school and never disclosed my D to anybody.
    by college you're basically an adult and should be ready to navigate the world by yourself. none of my friends or roommates at college ever knew i was diabetic and to this day i never tell anybody.
    never had a problem and i found life was much easier and better.
    so no ... i would not disclose it. unless ... there's a huge scholarship involved and you're certain to win.
     
  3. jilmarie

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    How is that even possible? Where did you keep your supplies? Didn't they notice the insulin that you kept in the fridge or the injections you were taking? I'm looking around my room right now and there are so many little signs of diabetes, I can't imagine hiding it.
     
  4. jilmarie

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    I would probably wait until after she accepts, but it's really up to you guys. It might be better to tell them before so you know that they're fully on board with the things she'll need to keep healthy while running. On a related note, I have a friend with diabetes who was a state champ hurdler in high school and ran track at a small college. Here's an article about him and diabetes http://www.journalstar.com/sports/article_4eb8905b-2027-5253-be87-acb7dbe96237.html?mode=story
     
  5. Scribe

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    quite easy, actually. when i was in college it was before meters, before pumps. there was no such thing as a d-bag. i took one shot a day of nph which i kept in a mini-fridge in my room.

    today, i have a pump so if people really wanted to know they could see it. nobody has ever asked. i test a lot but in a discrete way. the only think i carry besides my pump is my meter so i'm not weighed down with paraphernalia. it's likely somebody has noticed and figured it out. but that's different than disclosing it and acknowledging it.

    i've never had a d-crisis and after 50 years i figure the odds are pretty good that my record will stay intact. so, why change now?
     
  6. runnersmom

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    She is not allowed to sign a letter of intent until Feb. The school can make a verbal offer and she can verbally accept it but its not legally binding on either side till then. I would hope a coach would honor a verbal committment just as a matter of ethics. If he/she changed an offer after learning of her diabetes, I would think they might be afraid of a lawsuit. Anyhow, we are leaning toward telling them before for the reason you mentioned, we want to see their reaction and get a feel for how it would affect their treatment of her.
     
  7. runnersmom

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    Thanks for your advice and the article. Its good to see there are other track athletes who have competed succesfully at the college level. I think we will tell them before just to ( as you mentioned) get a feel for how they will treat her when she's on the team. Hopefully, it won't detract from her appeal to the coaches.
     
  8. AllyBui

    AllyBui New Member

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    I would say write the essay on anything that allows your college to show the most about who is and how experiences in his life really made him grow. For example, I wrote about my one week stay at a summer camp and how that was able to really help change all my outlooks before my senior year in HS. I also related that to many other things like modern society problems such as environmental racism and nano-robotic technologies. Hopefully, this helps a bit.
     
  9. wdhinn89

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    Same here. My son wrote his personal essay on his diabetes as well. One of the suggested topics for an essay on the common app was " Life Changing Experiences" and diabetes sure was one.

    My son made 7 out of 7 schools with scholarships to 6 of them. There was a mixture of local and away schools.

    I don't think having diabetes helped or harmed his acceptances. I just think it gave him an uncommon topic to write his essay on.
     
  10. marci65

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    My DS included info about him having diabetes in his app essays. He also has good grades and a few leadership positions in extra-currics he participates in. No telling what got him admitted, but he's very comfortable with people knowing he has diabetes and wears a pump.
     
  11. emm142

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    My university knew about D because I had to sit an entrance test (at the university) and I had a couple of interviews. The interviews were 30 mins each and the test was an hour, so I informed them about D in case I had any D issues during the process. My other universities were aware of D because I filled it in in the medical section of the application form. I was offered a place at all 5 universities, so D obviously didn't cause an issue for me.
     
  12. Ronin1966

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    Hello jilmarie:

    That's EASY. Believe it or not there WAS a time before meters and pumps. Some of us are from and lived (quite happily) in those "dark ages" :D with no problems.

    Insulin does NOT need to be kept in the fridge, unless you live in a hot climate. And until very recently it was pretty stable stuff. Today not nearly as much given the recumbent DNA... Injections can be done with absolutely nobody ever noticing... do them all the time!

    You have my curiosity, what "signs" exist?
     
  13. Ronin1966

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    Hello emm142:

    By definition diabetes CANNOT cause us issues... that is discrimination 101 and completely illegal.
     
  14. jilmarie

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    Stuart,
    Clearly I understand that there was a time before meters and pumps. When I was on NPH, my diabetes was far less noticible because I wasn't injecting at the table or punching buttons on my pump during a meal.

    Nevertheless, there were still scraps of diabetes - a jar of glucose tabs, a sharps container in my closet. My symptoms of low or high blood sugar. Perhaps I'm just more open about my diabetes, but it would be challenging for a college roommate not to notice the testing, injections, and supplies. I also have a several-month supply of insulin in my fridge. The vials not in use DO require refrigeration (so did NPH and regular).

    Quite frankly, I want my roommates and close friends to know so that they give me sugar if I'm acting strangely or call 911 if I lose consciousness.
     
  15. Ronin1966

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    Hello jilmarie:

    <<a jar of glucose tabs, a sharps container in my closet. My symptoms of low or high blood sugar.

    I've never had a sharps container... interesting. Those conversations true are simple, but not really effective. Requires someone be trusted, and sober and pretty aware on top of it. Dorm life, college... not too easy for most that way.

    Had and known lots of roommates, not many had all those qualities. Understand and certainly appreciate your perspective, think we're simply debating "degree" to some extent...
     
  16. deafmack

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    Under the American with Disabilities Act you don't have to tell people you have a 'disability' until you are hired and ask for accommodations. I think the same can be said for athletic scholarships. I would not say anything until she has the scholarship then if she goes to that college or university I would just go to the Special Services Office (Disabilities Office) and mention it there and let them know what kind of accommodations she will or might need.
     
  17. GreenyZach

    GreenyZach New Member

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    I know this is an older thread, but I would like to weigh in on this conversation. I actually went to my large, state university for two years before I decided to transfer due to the deduction of classes available for people majoring in linguistics. My freshman year was really, really bad! I did very well in high school (top 5% of class, great ACT score, and many awards/honors), so doing bad in college was a nightmare. I was diagnosed with Type II diabetes about halfway through my first semester. I kept getting extremely sick and missing classes because I was so, so sick. I considered dropping out, but my parents were paying a couple thousand dollars for me to be there per semester and I just couldn't leave, so I attempted to bare with it. One night, my roommate found me passed out in the hallway of our dorm and I was rushed the hospital where I almost died. They started doing tests and everything on me and discovered I did, in fact, have Type II. The semester ended and I finished with a D and C. I'm pre-med, so the chemistry class I received a D in had to be retaken for sure.

    The beginning of my second semester was no better than the end of the first. The medicine was making me super sick and I couldn't get my diet together right. I was taking a few difficult classes because I thought I could do it, but I just couldn't. I made three C's that semester and one of the C's was the chemistry class I re-took. I felt so, so, so bad! My GPA at the end of the year was a 2.92 and my med school GPA was a 2.0. I had never done this bad in my entire life. But I went back my sophomore year, after spending my summer getting better. Long story short, I finished the school year with straight A's, including in two classes I re-took, and I finished the school year with a 3.75. I applied to transfer to a few schools and I was accepted to Cornell's College of Arts and Sciences. I told this same story and how it negatively impacted my academic success, and I guess it did it.

    The moral of the story is - if you're diabetic and it ruins your academic career, tell the admissions committee. They want to hear it. It matters.
     

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