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Anyone here have seizures or fainting episodes?

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by lynn, Apr 1, 2010.

  1. WestinsMom

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    Paula sent me here, so I will give you my opinion. :) Westin has epileptic seizures but his are while falling asleep or waking. It was very obvious on the EEG. I will say the confusion sounds completely normal after a seizure. The feeling ahead of time is something they have asked Westin about many times. But he is sleeping so it isn't something he notices.

    Have your ped refer you to a Neurologist. Dr Fain at Bronson is who we see.

    Oh, if you would like any other info, feel free to email me at mcurtis596 at aol dot com
     
  2. lynn

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    Thank you. I talked to the nurse today and his ped said that all of the tests were normal. We will see on Monday but I will be pressing for a neurologist. I will probably have some questions for you.
     
  3. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    I passed out about three weeks ago and fell on my face and busted my lip and chipped one of my front teeth. I was really shaken up. I was out for only a few seconds and my blood sugar at the time was in the two hundreds. I had just had an EEG and MRI for some weird episodes we thought might be partial seizures (I have two epileptic brothers) but the EEG was normal and the MRI was close to normal ("prominence of the cisterna magna").

    The following week I was in the hospital for something I think was unrelated, and I mentioned the passing out episode to my doctor who then put me on a heart monitor overnight, which showed nothing. However, my regular doctor has also suggested that maybe it's a heart issue, and wants me to wear a Holt monitor at home to maybe catch an arrhythmia or something.
     
  4. lynn

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    Thank you, Jonah.
     
  5. mathcat

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    Along with diabetes, my son has the same type of epilepsy as Westin. I completely agree with his mom that a referral to a neurologist is in order. That way an EEG and possibly an MRI can be done. Jacob's seizures have only been while sleeping but I can certainly attest to the confusion that can occur after a seizure.

    It may be that neurology is not the way to go at all but it sounds like some testing is in order so as to find out.

    I hope you get some answers soon.
     
  6. hrtmom3

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    Lynn,
    My daughter has had fainting spells or close to fainting that went on for months. She had all sorts of testing done-ekg's, hooked up to heart monitor, tested for seizures, blood work, and table tilt test. They couldn't find anything and ended up telling her she had Vasovagal Syncope which I believe is just a fancy word for unexplained fainting. Although they did give her a list of things that could trigger the fainting if you have this and for her what triggers it is physical or emotional stress on her body. She was told to up her salt intake and drink more drinks with electrolites. She was also told if she was to drink caffeine that she needed to drink an equal amount of water right after. Her stress level has gone down these past few months and so have the episodes. She does get them when it gets closer to period time. Also she was told to not lay down when this is happening, but to kind of squat with knees bent-something about not enough blood getting to the brain and that would help.
    It's frustrating not knowing what is going on. I hope you are able to find out soon.

    Edit:
    There were times when she didn't pass out, but she for the most part could feel these episodes coming on and would feel like she was just out of it, was awake, but not really there.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2010
  7. ScottB

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    WHEW where do I begin. I've been having seizures since I was 20 and have all kinds of scars on my head to prove it from all the falls I've taken. I may be wrong on this but seizures usually fall in 2 categories, petite mal and gran mal however the cause or reason behind them can be hard to pin down sometimes because just because a person has seizures doesn't necessarily mean epilepsy. I've had many cat scans, EEG's, MRI's even spent a week and a half at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota with all tests showing my brain was just fine from a physical point of view. It wasn't until my neurologist tried a different approach and prescribed me to antidepressants rather than typical epilepsy meds that my seizures almost (key word is "almost") stopped. I went from having 2 to 5 gran mal seizures a week to 1 or 2 a year. I'm not saying that this is what could be your sons problem, what I'm saying is that seizures don't absolutely positively mean epilepsy so what I suggest is that you take your son to a neurologist as well as a cardiologist. Good luck.
     
  8. luvmyboyz

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    My 15 yr old son had a fainting spell in August and one in Oct. We had a bunch of tests done including blood work, head CT, an ekg and some others. The doctor (ped cardiologist) could find nothing wrong. Just like another mom posted we were told to increase salt and fluids like gatorade especially during heavy activities. The doctor told me that this is common in teenagers.
     
  9. lynn

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    Can you give me a description of what your son felt before he fainted?
     
  10. lynn

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    Thanks Scott. Will you describe to me how you feel before a seizure?
     
  11. ScottB

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    Please keep in mind that I'm only speaking for myself and what I'm about to describe should not be used as some sort of benchmark. An aura for me is basically a warning that if I don't do something then the risk of having a seizure is high if not imminent. By "doing something" I mean stop what ever it is I'm doing, sit down and relax, maybe grab a bite to eat or simply lay down and take a nap. I have a whole bag of tricks on how I deal with it but those 3 are the main ones. The feeling I get is hard to describe but light headedness is too vague. It's more of a sensation where I realize nothing around me is making sense and it's hard for me to focus my thoughts. In a worst case scenario everything around me seems like a surreal dream and by that time it's usually too late because once a seizure starts, all I can do is hope it doesn't last long. In my case I can recall though not very clearly what was going on around me while having a seizure and all I can say about that is that it's not fun. The good news is that my ability to sense an aura and know what to do about it is why I have a valid drivers license, have a valid auto insurance policy and have a job in structural steel with an employer that is confident that I know when it's time to stop what I'm doing before I hurt myself or any fellow employees.

    How I feel afterwards generally depends on how severe the seizure was and how long the seizure lasted. The longer it lasted means the lousier I feel both mentally and physically and I'm usually worthless for the rest of the day. I'm trying to refrain giving you too much info mainly because I don't want to scare the h..l out of you and you become misinformed because of it because the way you've described your sons seizure activity, though there are some similarities with mine, the 2 are not the identical which is why you shouldn't use what I've described above as a benchmark. If neither a pediatrician or cardiologist can give you an EXACT reason or diagnosis for your sons seizure activity then I strongly urge you to have your son see a neurologist. In my opinion a neurologist is to seizures as an endo is to diabetes.
     
  12. suzyq63

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    I completely agree with the others who have said you need a neurologist. It does sound like seizure activity to me, especially with the exhaustion afterward. Alison, who also has diabetes, has had seizures (not related to diabetes) for 12 1/2 years (only partial types, never fully losing consciousness). Your son needs an EEG; although unfortunately even a "normal" EEG cannot rule out seizures. Alison's EEGs are normal unless she actually has a seizure while hooked up. The good news is that for most people, seizures can be very well controlled with medication. After quite a bit of trial and error, we have found the right medication and dosage for her.

    I hope you are able to get some answers quickly. I will never forget the two months it took for us to finally get the diagnosis.
     
  13. ScottB

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    I just discussed this with my wife who has petite mal seizures. Her seizure activity is because of a sever car accident she had about a year before we met that left her in a coma for 3 days and her sense of an aura is completely different from mine. She says it starts with a slightly upset or "butterfly" feeling in her stomach and then goes to a feeling of deja vu and she too has learned what to do and how to do it in order to avoid having a seizure. In her case if a seizure does occur, she doesn't remember having it and she too can but not always feel lousy for the rest of the day. One thing I should point out (and I'm being very basic) is that the best way I can describe a petite mal seizure is that the person having one seems to "fade out" and can fall if having one while standing while a person having a gran mal is convulsing like a fish out of water. Yeah I know I should've chosen better words to describe the 2 but it's the only way I can think of right now.
     
  14. lynn

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    Thank you very much. I understand what you are saying about not comparing directly to my son. I am trying to gather experiences.
     
  15. luvmyboyz

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    Lynn,
    I think he felt dizzy and he felt like he was going to throw-up. I am constantley making sure he is hydrated and has snacks. The second incident happened while he was trying out for the swim team. Thank goodnes he had gotten out of the pool :eek:
     
  16. ScottB

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    1 thing that may help your son avoid having a seizure is comparing what was different on the days he has had a seizure compared to the days he didn't and if there are similarities on the days he had seizures but not on the days where he felt fine, you may be able to come up with a plan that could limit the opportunities for a seizure to occur in the first place. For me, not getting a good nights sleep and having a stress filled day can really set the stage for a seizure later in the day which is why taking a nap when sensing an aura can usually snap me out of it. For my wife, the seizures that actually occur always seem to coincide with her menstrual cycle.

    Even if there are similarities you still may not be able to do a thing to avoid it but don't give up hope. Our son Jason had a juvenile form of epilepsy starting when he was about 5, he would have a seizure either as he was falling asleep at bedtime or when he was waking up in the morning. Once he was correctly diagnosed and prescribed the proper meds, he was seizure free unless he forgot to take his meds the day before. After being seizure free for 2 years even on days he did forget to take his meds, his neurologist gradually took him off his meds. As it stands now Jason has been seizure free AND med free for at least 8 years now because the form of epilepsy he had was one that he would outgrow if treated properly. I don't want to get your hopes up too high because it seems your sons seizure activity isn't the same as Jason's either. With that said try to remain positive, continue to learn as much as you can about it and move forward and hopefully your son will be as fortunate as our son was.
     
  17. hmmmcormick

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    Lynn,
    Morgan has seizures, though not the type you describe. I have been given so much literature and read so much about seizures and what you describe does sound like seizure activity. I think an eeg is definitely an appropriate test to run. There are types of seizures where people do continue to walk and seem to just be daydreaming, but have no recollection of it afterward. Does he ever pull at his clothes or pick at them like he has a thread loose or a button loose? That is a common gesture during these types of seizures. Morgan used to pick and pull at his clothes when he had one of those.
     
  18. MReinhardt

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    I'm just curious...Have they checked him for Orthostatic Hypotension. At first one of my girls drs though she had seizures, but in further testing no.

    From a lying position, to sitting, to standing..what happens, is the blood pressure drops and heart rate increases, then in some cases passes out.

    Chell..my oldest has had this for years, and drs finally diagnosed her with this after doing a tilt table test. With Chell...she gets a headache, dizzy, everything gets dark, she said its like a black curtain covering her face, and then she passes out.

    My youngest one was just diagnosed with this over the past week, after she had a nasty fall off of a bar-stool..and now a head concussion from that fall.

    In some cases meds can help...My girls have been taught to get up slowly, and they can't make any sudden moves or jolts with out being effected.

    Hopefully soon..you'll be able to get some answers.
     
  19. lynn

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    No, he hasn't been officially tested for that. They have talked about it though and didn't go any further with it. He doesn't have the problem when he moves that way. He can be walking for awhile, or standing for awhile, etc. It doesn't seem to matter.

    Thank you for the input. Now I'll go look up the tilt table test so we can know what to expect if he is sent for that.
     
  20. lynn

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    Hmmm, he hasn't picked at clothes. He has wiped his mouth repeatedly or smacked himself on the head often.

    My sister with epilepsy has the daydreaming kind. One time she ended up on the other side of the state with her newborn daughter and no money or gas to get home.
     

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