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Anyone gone through surgery with your T1???

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by KylorsMom, Oct 19, 2013.

  1. KylorsMom

    KylorsMom Approved members

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    In our complete life overhaul and focus on our little ones diabetes management we completely missed the boat on his dental care... to the tune of 9 cavities and some are REALLY bad (epic fail there but we are trying to give our selves some grace) Anyway, his poor little teeth are so bad that they will need to put him under to complete all the work. I would be nervous about my four year old being under no matter what but with his T1... it's even worse. I know he will not be able to eat for a certian amount of time before the procedure and our endo said he will need to be at leat 150 beforehand. And we will need to check his BG often. Anyone ever been through this?? If they go low how did you treat? Were you allowed in? I am freaking out just a little about all the what ifs :eek:
     
  2. StacyMM

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    My daughter had her tonsils removed. Wasn't very long. We had it done at the same hospital our endo is at and got the first surgery time because of fasting. We ran her high (150-200) and corrected after she was eating again. They did keep her overnight for observation since it was a surgery that limits eating and they wanted to make sure all was well and we didn't get hit with lows but her numbers were great all day and night. She had a cavity filled but it wasn't a major procedure. I had her numbers higher when we got there and checked her asap after.

    My son has had two surgeries. First was short, but even with reduced basal and first appointment he went low on the way to the hospital. Since he couldn't eat/drink they put him on a glucose drip as soon as we got there. He was low in recovery, too, but they pushed more glucose. The second was about 4 hours. We reduced basals and added a Gatorade just before the eating deadline, and got pre-approval to give Gatorade in case of lows. They set up the glucose drip and monitored his BG throughout. After the surgery, he kept the drip for about an hour, I think. It went very smoothly this time around.
     
  3. librarylady

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    Yes, my daughter had an appendectomy a few years ago. They put her on a glucose drip during the surgery and were in contact with her endo. I sat down with them before the surgery and made sure that I understood exactly what would be done and when. I knew how often her blood sugar would be tested and what the plan was for if it was out of range. After her initial recovery when she was back in her regular hospital room I took control of her diabetes related care and they took care of her surgery related care. Don't be afraid to have your voice heard. The hospital staff were really wonderful about including us in the decisions about her care.
     
  4. Helenmomofsporty13yearold

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    ...tonsils, appendix and most recently all 4 wisdom teeth. Endo recommended dropping basals by 30%, but I did not want to take any chances and dropped them by 50%. We kept basals 30% lower until she was eating again regularly again. She had an IV in each time in case they needed to give her glucose.
     
  5. KylorsMom

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    He will have an IV... a glucose drip is something I didn't think of... I was worried about having to give him a low dose glucogon... or frosting or something. That puts my mind at ease a bit. He will be at a surgery center not the hospital and that makes me a bit nervous... as well as the fact that he wont really be able to eat for a few hours after.
     
  6. Wren

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    We had to put 2 kids under for dental care, but not w/D.

    Our daughter who had 13 cavities filled at age 4 is now 10 and hasn't had another cavity - even now w D. The second kid had molars come in without enamel and they had to be crowned.

    Both ate Popsicles on the ride home. Our kids were a little nauseous right after but didn't vomit. Our 4-year-old went at 5 am so that she wouldn't be wake and hungry before, and had to fast since midnight. We weren't in the room by very close.
     
  7. KylorsMom

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    Thanks Wren..
    Popsicle is a good idea. It is pretty aggressive procedure-wise but the dentist said if we do this he should not have anymore problems, and the teeth they crown will never get another cavity. Seems like these kids have enough challenges that dental is just unfair. But when you have to give them jelly beans at 3am to keep them alive.... :) Our dentist is pretty amazing and so understanding. I felt like a horrible parent seeing how bad they had gotten.
     
  8. Beach bum

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    My daughter had an endoscopy a few years ago. They had her scheduled as one of the first procedures that day. Our endo sent a set of specific orders for the hospital to follow, along with instructions for us (reduce basal x amount x hours prior).

    For the ride home we had applesauce for her. She definitely was nauseous for a while, don't know if it was the meds or the long car ride or both.

    Good luck!
     
  9. nanhsot

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    My son had emergency surgery when he broke his leg skiing. He wore his pump but turned the basal down by 50%. I asked for CGM but they took it out, it was on the leg being operated on. After surgery pain was pretty significant and he needed double basal most of the time. In our situation lows were never an issue. They tested him frequently in surgery. Afterwards I did, as I stayed in the room much of the time (they tested too, but I was able to call the shots on management, they were clueless).
     
  10. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Might want to try switching to juice boxes for night time low treatments. The straw helps reduce the risk of cavities.
     
  11. moco89

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    I guess this is easy for me to say as I am not a parent.

    Don't let the guilt consume you about the amount of cavities your child has, or how terrible they are, and having to put the child under anesthesia for dental work. I know that your child should not have to go through this but, the child's teeth can be fixed. I would focus more on getting that taken care of.

    Afterwards, I would make sure to take pride and effort in your child's dental care. This is geared towards adults, but I read this book, and I follow the author's guide to taking care of my teeth. I go to the dentist every 4 months, disregarding the title of this book.

    Anyways, don't be consumed by guilt. Just try to deal with the problems and move on.
     
  12. pianoplayer4

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    I've had three surgeries in the past four years =/ I assume he'll be hooked up to an iv? if so then you only have to worry about keeping his sugars up until he gets there. I usually lowered my basal for the entire time I couldn't eat, and about five minutes before midnight I'd eat a snack... no matter what my numbers were. Also, it depends on the kind of surgery, but I know for my first two I was allowed to have clear liquids (apple juice) if absolutely necessary... so maybe ask about that?
     
  13. missmakaliasmomma

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    Don't feel too bad. I see kids with NO medical issues have some nasty teeth and just wonder why.. but really sometimes it's genetics. Some people just have bad teeth prone to cavities. When he loses his teeth and gets his adult ones, that's when I'd really make it a point to watch , and especially brush every day.

    My sister's teeth rotted at a young age (maybe 2?) and she had to have them taken out.. I've never really had much of an issue. Same parents, just different genes I guess.

    My daughter doesn't have any cavities but when her teeth first grew in, the middle ones on the bottom fused together, which causes a place for plaque to grow. They did an xray and said it doesn't look like the adult teeth will be fused but it's something we won't know til it happens. Then she might need something to be done about it.
     
  14. mom24grlz

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    Ashleigh's had surgery twice, not dental though. First was minor only lasting 6-7 minutes, last year she had spinal fusion that lasted 4 hours. Prior to both surgeries we reduced the basal in her pump. We made sure she was one of the first surgeries of the day. We were allowed to give clear juices or gatorade up to 3 hours before surgery for lows. With both surgeries i tested bs before she went back. Minor surgery she kept her pump on, and then i just retested again once she was in recovery. Spinal surgery they put her on an insulin drip and checked bs every 30 min while in surgery
     
  15. mocha

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    I had my wisdom teeth removed a few years ago, and they put my under.

    Honestly, the dental person removing my teeth was an idiot when it came to diabetes. He told me no insulin for 24 hours prior to surgery. :rolleyes: Yeah...that didn't happen.

    I ended up running myself higher to avoid lows. Trauma to the body can do some pretty weird things to blood sugars, so check often. I had to crank up my basal, but you never know. Diabetes never plays fair.

    Chewing might also not be easy after all of that, so look for easy low treatment that doesn't involve chewing, like juice or frosting. Meals that don't require chewing might be a good idea for a day or two as well. He'll be sick of mashed potatoes and milkshakes and smoothies by the end of it.
     

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