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Anyone else having severe behavioral problems with their D Teen???

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by hughsfan30, Aug 7, 2009.

  1. hughsfan30

    hughsfan30 Approved members

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    I understand that Jacob has alot on his plate right now, entering high school, ragin hormones and of course being D, but he talks to me and treats me as if I am..pardon the expression...**** on his shoes!
    I have tried calm, not so calm, taking things away, grounding..etc...NOTHING WORKS.
    He is due to leave for D camp in three days and Im starting to feel he is just gonna think he still gets rewarded for being horrid.
    Advice welcome cause im about to loose it!:eek:
     
  2. Charmed7

    Charmed7 Approved members

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    I think D camp might be good. One thing I have been reminded of...even though my son (now 10) has had Diabetes since he was 4, he still goes through a maturity level has a new outlook on diabetes (and his other conditions) which leaves us open to re-educate, re-ground, and bring hope back into their lives.

    He may be going through something like that, and the camp may help him. Getting away from the house may help him too.

    I think it's always good to sit down and have a healthy conversation about respect, and consequences. Maybe when he gets back, bring it up that you expect to be respected no matter how crappy he feels. It's also good to give him suggestions on how to handle those feelings. So if you ask him to clean his room, it's one thing to huff and roll your eyes (though this would still be disrespectful in my book) it's a whole nother issue if he starts yelling at you about how horrible you are and you make him do everything around here! That's not tolerated. So he needs to learn a new way to handle that. And it's up to you to teach him.

    I hope that is a little helpful. I wouldn't worry about the "treat" of D Camp. I think it will do you both some good to have the break and start fresh when he gets back.

    Oh boy, can't wait until mine turns 12!

    Charmed
     
  3. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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  4. 2type1s

    2type1s Approved members

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    I second Ellen...don't take away the camp. Peers are most influencial at this age, not parents. Morgan went through this a year ago. I yelled, grounded, cried...nothing worked, except taking away her make-up. I know you have a boy, but there has to be something that is valuable to him that is meaningful. Disrespect should NEVER be tolerated, and a good family therapist can get you all back on track. Teenage angst is the worse, and I was worse with my D daughter than my non-D daughter. Things are better now....I've had no problems in about 6 months, and she is DELIGHTFUL since coming back from D camp. She is even more conscientious about her D than ever.
     
  5. muddymessalonskee

    muddymessalonskee Approved members

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    My D son was just horrid too. Mine was dx'd at 14 and the combination of hormones and bg was pretty toxic. He's 18 now and acting mostly civilized, he's no longer verbally abusive, he's stopped teasing his sisters (mostly), and he's usually reasonable. Yours is way ahead of the game if he agreed to go to D camp. Mine refused: said he didn't want to become a "diabetes object" like his sister!

    Patience, patience, and more patience are the keys.

    Deborah
     
  6. Corinne Masur

    Corinne Masur Approved members

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    Any chance that going away to D camp is related to how he's treating you? Hard as this may be to believe, it may be possible that he is having feelings about the separation and is making it easier to leave by feeling angry with you and making you angry with him.
     

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