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Any tips for starting kindergarten Monday?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by missmakaliasmomma, Sep 7, 2013.

  1. missmakaliasmomma

    missmakaliasmomma Approved members

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    I'm a wreck. I've been dreading this day forever lol. I hate putting my daughter's health in the hands of other people. I know I would have to eventually. I guess im a litttleee bit of a control freak lol.

    The good thing is, she got an RN as her 1:1 aid. Makes me feel a little better

    My question is school lunches/ snacks. What do your kids bring? My daughter usually doesnt have a snack after lunch now but she will in school. 2 hours after lunch. Since she usually is higher at that 2 hr mark, I want to make her a variety of low gi lunches so the nurse doesnt freak out because theres a high number before snack. It can be warm, I'm going to get a thermos. Right now with what she usually eats, I give her a combo bolus but I dont want the nurse to have to do one. Shes not picky at all. I'd like tips for healthy snacks too. I've only bought popcorn so far. Plan on doing carrots and ranch as well.

    Any other tips for a first time parent of a kindergartener in relation to D besides relax??? haha
     
  2. kim5798

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    Not a lot of advice for you...but try to relax:) I remember in those days I did a lot of volunteering at school. Not necessarily in her classroom...but at least if I was helping in the office, or even in my older son's classroom, I was nearby.

    as far as snacks...string cheese? a few grapes? They are little kids, they don't need huge snacks.

    Wishing you the best of luck!
     
  3. cm4kelly

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    I was there last year -

    Lots of us have been there and believe me - it is difficult, but you can do it.
    My son just started first grade so we survived kindergarten!

    As for low carb snacks - my son likes pepperonis, mild slim jims, string cheese for low carbs snacks. But I always have other snacks with the nurse too in case his blood sugar is on the low side. Granola bars, peanut butter crackers etc. I pack his snacks and lunches and put an index card inside with the carb count of each individual item and a total.

    My suggestion would be to check with the teacher about your child's daily/weekly schedule to walk through her activities. This gives you a chance to think through dosing.

    The difficult thing we found was recess (his was right after lunch)! I give my son 8 free carbs with lunch so that he can have that to help him through 20 minutes of outside recess. On his lunch index card - I just show a subtraction for 8 free carbs for recess and show the new total.

    Also - does she have PE? What time and what days? I give him a little extra free on Mondays (15 carbs) with lunch because PE follows recess - but only on Mondays. THe first day I didn't and he went low at PE.

    I think knowing your child's schedule and OF COURSE being on friendly terms with the nurse helps. Find a way for her to communicate with you. My nurse emails me numbers every so often. Some nurses can text you too with a report at the end of the day. Be prepared to make some adjustments.

    She will do great!
     
  4. missmakaliasmomma

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    They are expecting me to be there for awhile on Monday so I can figure out the schedule to see what will be best for her in terms of those weird days with gym and sometimes the weather not permitting recess, etc. I will also come at lunch time for probably the first week so the nurse feels comfortable with the pump and my daughters number, etc.
     
  5. momof2marchboys

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    We used the first two weeks of school as a learning time to figure out how our DS would handle the different schedule and routine. Then I made adjustments to his pump from there for his basal rates as he is much more active at school than he is at home. Also the newness and excitement of school seemed to make him high the first couple days so I basically ignored those numbers.

    For Kinder. we had a snack bucket that he had for his afternoon snack filled with a variety of snacks that he could choose from that were 15 carbs and under - fruit roll ups, 100 cal pack cookies and brownies. I also had a water bottle and crystal light to go packets that he could use to make a juice to go with his snack as the rest of the class had milk to go with theres. The bucket also had smarties in it to be used for treating lows when OJ was not available.
    As for lunch the head lunch person figures out the carbs for each item on his tray and gives to the aid that checks his tray after lunch before he dumps it and they plug that amount into his pump before he heads to recess (if it is pizza or pasta they call me with how to do the combo/delayed bolus).

    Make sure you have a Diabertes Medical Care Plan filled out, Dr's orders that state the parents can make the decision on the carb ratio's and insulin given. Get a 504 in place with the school early on to avoid headaches down the road. Ask the school to have more than one person trained for the care of your child (the aid may be gone for some reason) We have 3 people that I trained in the school now and another 1 that is familiar with his care too.

    I met with his main teachers and school nurse prior to school starting to go over signs of being to high or to low so they knew what to watch for and the seriousness of him being to high or low for extended periods of time. I gave them handouts that were in our training book at diagnosis to keep for reference

    I drew up a 1 page "cheat sheet" for our school to have on had with what todo when his blood glucose is certain levels and when the checks need to be done (midmorning, before lunch, after recess, before PE and before getting on bus).

    I also have made myself available to the school via my cell phone either via text, call, IM, or email - my husband is available too if they can't get ahold of me. I keep 2 extra infusion sets at school incase his comes out it can be put in, I or my husband have gone to school to do this more than once as the school nurse is not there everyday and they are not comfortable doing it.

    Remember you are your childs best advocate and stand your ground if you need to on how they handle the care of your child
     
  6. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    To echo some of the previous posts...

    The first few weeks will be the hardest. I know you have a new baby but as much as possible you'll want to 'get the lay of the land' and see how they daily routine works with her meals and insulin peak times and to see if the RN/Aide is good or not.

    I always found Sept. to be very stressful, but by Oct I always felt great relief that my DD was safe and that I had looked at the situation and made the needed contingency plans and had, to the extent possible, tried to foresee any problems and then, it was a great relief.
     
  7. SarahKelly

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    Let us know how it goes. Isaac starts Monday, I am an emotional basketcase, but he doesn't know that ;) It's amazing how together one can look when internally they are a ball of worry. I keep saying to myself, "it's okay, it's been done before with hundreds of other kids, it will be fine."
    So, I say the same to you, "It's okay, it's been done before with hundreds of other kids, it will be fine."
    As for snacks we're sticking to fruits, veggies, meats and cheeses. Isaac has been diagnosed with celiac disease, so that cuts out most processed foods. After meeting with the teacher we thought these basic areas were the best to stick to for the class as a whole. So, hopefully you and I will find that Monday is just fine, Tuesday even better and by Friday it's a breeze. :)
    Take care.
     
  8. missmakaliasmomma

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    We have a 504 in place already, she will have a 1:1 RN with her at all times and they hired a backup RN in case the regular one isn't there. Tomorrow I will be going in explaining things more in detail about highs/lows, treating them, etc. I tell them all the time, pleaseee call me if anything comes up. I'd much rather be called then have them try to figure something out that they're not comfortable with. I'm sure her 1:1 nurse and I will be exchanging numbers and will become great friends!! :p

    They don't want to change infusion sets if something happens, and honestly, I wouldn't want anyone to do it other than me anyway. Good thing I can walk to the school lol. Because they are not comfortable changing the sets though, I personally think MDI would definitely be easier in this situation as they have only had ONE other child on the pump in recent years. What if I have to go to the store 30 min away and she's waiting there so I can change the set? I don't like that idea. They are more used to injections. My dd wants to go back to mdi anyway though, we're giving the pump another month to see if she feels any different.

    The nurse said that they have to have a set order for dosaging of insulin, like, they can't change it if I tell them over the phone. They have to give what the pump says. However, she said I could come in and give it to her, they just can't legally change the dosage. So, if shes running high because she's getting sick or something, they can't just give an extra unit of insulin. I would have to. Maybe this IS something I should talk to the dr about though to see if they can put it in her orders.

    As far as those snacks, I'd rather her eat healthier. We don't eat that stuff at home so I don't want to mess up what we do here. I'm thinking carrots/ranch or celery with pb, stuff like that.

    My daughter basically only drinks crystal light (well the 4c one as that's made with splenda and not aspertame) so she will probably have an abundance of that lol. And for the time being, I'll be sending her lunches until I become comfortable enough to trust that the nurse can carb count accurately. Not like they're stupid or anything like that, but we all know some foods we have to count as more carbs than they actually are.
     
  9. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    May I ask, and really, I'm not being snarky, but why are you even bothering to give pumping another month? It's obvious from your posts that you don't like it, that you don't trust it and that you have convinced everyone in your orbit to distrust it as well, including your daughter, so why not just stick it in a drawer and get back to what you feel more comfortable with?
     
  10. momof2marchboys

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    I guess I don't understand why the need for a 1:1 RN - we had a 1:1 para for DS during classroom times due his learning delay to help him with classwork and she ended up being the one that did his BG checks and another person on staff did his corrections for highs and lunch bolus.
    Our school doesn't have a full time nurse and when there is a nurse I think she is just an LPN and is there basically to handle the paperwork and make sure everyone is up on their shots and things.
    As for not trusting the pump -maybe you need to go back to your pump trainer and see if there are changes that need to be made - we have ours programmed for different basals based on the daily activites - MTW he gets less basal during the afternoons as they have recess, PE and then recess again while the other days they don't have PE - we have different basal pattern's set up for different hours of the day b/c of the way his body handles insulin. And about the only time we do a combo is on pizza, pasta and pancakes and just deal with the highs if we have one at the 2 hour after meal check. The school has no idea when I make changes to his pump for carb ratios or basal amounts. I would never expect them to make changes to his pump either b/c they do not talk to his dr office, I do.

    For infusion set changes I guess I take it in stride - we live 15 minutes from school so it is going to take me 15-25 minutes to get there. During that time he continues on with his day as is and drinks water or carb free juice until I get there if he is acting fine. The one day it had been out for sometime before he said anything to anyone and was getting pretty pale and sweaty that they laid him in the office and let him play on the ipad until i got there.
     
  11. hawkeyegirl

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    Other than kids on the pod, I doubt you'd find many posters on the board who would have the school nurse change a site if it comes out. I think we've had one site come out in 5 years of school. It's really not a big deal If you're 30 minutes away, she waits for 30 minutes. Really, compared to...everyone else on the board who has sent their child to school, you have nothing to worry about. You have a medical professional following her around every second of every day. She's probably safer at school than she is at home.

    I also agree with Sarah. I think the fact that you don't really want to pump is having an effect on your success with the pump. You clearly don't like it at all. Why not just go back to MDI?
     
  12. Amy C.

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    I don't think you are going to have many problems. You are the first person I recall on this forum whose child gets a 1:1 aid who is a nurse.

    Once you get used to someone else doing some of the care, you should be able to relax. It will be good to allow someone else to take care of your child -- you have been the sole one for a long time.
     
  13. missmakaliasmomma

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    Boy I hope so! It might actually be nice to share the responsibility with someone I know is trained to do it. Hopefully I will eventually be able to relax.
     
  14. missmakaliasmomma

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    I'm trying to give it a good shot since so many others absolutely love it. Though, I know everyone is different of course. I want it to be my daughter's choice without my opinion weighing much on her decision. So we will give it another go for the month and I will keep my mouth shut on my opinions of it so she can make the decision herself. I do wish the pump gave me less issues, I consider myself smart and quick to learn but this has been a difficult thing for me. I feel like I'm doing everything right, and still fail. That's a sucky way to feel, especially when it comes to the person I love the most in this world. I'm sure you know what I mean.

    The fact that she has a nurse does make me feel like she's pretty damn safe at school. I feel like without her wearing a dex at school, with the nurse being 1:1- they'll be able to catch wacky numbers quick since my daughter herself is very unaware of highs or lows.
     
  15. Beach bum

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    The first weeks of school are always the hardest. After all that time of being the ones in charge you are relinquishing duties. It is hard, but in time you will become more comfortable and be able to relax a bit. There will be hiccups along the way. Unless it is something major I wouldn't think of it as incompetence, but more of a learning curve.
    You are in an incredibly unique situation where you not only have a school nurse, but a RN as a 1:1. I'd love to live in your school district!:) Our nurse is trained to change sets, but that is because she goes on overnight camps with kids. But, we've had bad sets at school and they have never changed one. They've corrected via syringe and left it for me to deal with at home. This isn't because they don't want to, it's because my daughter doesn't want it. Now, my daughter would do it with assistance from the nurse. As for adjusting doses, we have it written to "dose insulin based on pump recommendations, or per parents instructions."

    I have to echo what others have said. If you are having such challenges with pumping, why don't you just step away and go back to MDI? It isn't written anywhere in stone that you have to pump. Many here successfully manage diabetes on MDI. It may take creative dosing for some situations, but it can work. You might also relieve some of your stress about starting school too.
     
  16. kirsteng

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    I envy all of you in the US that have access to a school nurse at all.

    We are in Canada, we don't have 504 plans, and I'm sending my 4 year old to school today (thankfully still a half day this year) without so much as a teacher's assistant in the classroom. There is NO ONE to look after him, except his kindergarten teacher, who is upwards of 70 years old and clearly knows nothing about, nor wants to know anything about, diabetes. The plan is to get the school's teaching assistant (one assistant for the whole school of 350 students, of which there are 3 with autism and perhaps others with medical needs) trained to check bg's at some point this month. Until then, I come into the classroom each day before snack time to check his bg and hope every minute before and after that that his teacher has read anything that I've given her and knows any of the signs of hypoglycemia.

    So try to relax and enjoy your child's first day - believe me, if I were you, I would be! ;)
     
  17. susanlindstrom16

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    My daughter just started kindergarten last week but they were all half days and I worked from home just to be close in case I needed to drop by. The first 2 days I went over before lunchtime and went through everything with the nurse and by the third day everything seemed to go ok. I feel like this week will be the real test because she will be there full day and I am at work. We shall see. It was the first time I didn't get to walk her to her classroom, just dropped her off at the front door and watched her go up the stairs. That was hard for me!
     
  18. missmakaliasmomma

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    I feel horrible that there is no one to take care of your son =(
     
  19. missmakaliasmomma

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    Her first day was great. I was there the whole day to make sure the nurses were ok with using the pump. Today, we only came in before lunch and snack to make sure. Her nurses are great and her numbers have been better than I thought they were going to be. I'd like them to be a bit lower but I will ask for help with that in a post. How was your sons??
     
  20. kirsteng

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    Awww, thanks Kristen. There has been improvement today in that the principal told me that they have now put in for another 1/2 time EA for the school - so at least the one won't be spread so thin. The other good news is that the EA is great - has read all sorts of things about type 1, and really wants to make sure my son is safe. I think it was from her request that the school might be getting additional support. So while it's not fantastic by any means, things are looking up over here! :rolleyes:

    Glad to hear that your daughter's first day went well!
     

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