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Advise / Tips for flying with pump & cgm...first time

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by e23nk, Mar 13, 2013.

  1. e23nk

    e23nk Approved members

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    Hi everyone,
    We are taking a trip and this will be the first time my son will be on a plane with his pump and CGM. We have the Animas Ping and Dexcom 7 Plus.

    We are looking for any advise / tips you may have...including airport security check points, takeoff, inflight and landing issues?

    Also we are going to Disney and Universal so any thoughts or tips there would be appreciated too.

    Thanks for the help.
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I just tell the screener that my dd is wearing a medical device and see that she goes through the metal detector not the full body scanner. They have seen it all before. You show up with a carry on full of D supplies ( tell them it's your medical supply bag before it's x-rayed) and they get it. Internationally we've had to do a bit more explaining, but for domestic flights the juice boxes raise more eyebrows than the technology.
     
  3. BaltoMom

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    My best advice to you is to give yourself an extra bit of time to get through security. I know the rules are supposed to be standardized, but every airport's security team handles D equipment differently. Your child will almost certainly have to get a pat-down. I did, too, one time since we were carrying unopened juice boxes. They insisted that one parent would need to get the pat-down, too. Just be ready to go with the flow to get yourself through there faster.
    As for flying, we've disconnected my son for takeoff and landing, and we've just kept the pump going as usual. I've never noticed an issue for him with flight-related issues.
    I haven't been to Disney, but there's already tons of advice on CWD from parents who have been.
    Good luck and enjoy your trip!
     
  4. ashtensmom

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    I have read others say that BG can drop quickly from thrill rides. One person mentioned that they were stuck on a ride for 1/2 hour ish. I guess my tip would be to carry a couple tabs of glucose in your pocket if both of the above happens (in case you don't carry a purse onto to rides)
     
  5. mocha

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    As far as flying goes, your son will probably have to get a patdown. Do not let them bully you in to going through the full body scanners. They will destroy insulin pumps and CGMs. Regular metal detectors are fine (but I haven't seen those in forever, so don't get your hopes up), but even then, you'll probably have to get a patdown.

    You can let everything medical stay on the whole flight. There is no need to turn anything off. Some people disconnect during takeoff and landing because pressure changes from those times can mess with insulin in the cartridge and tubing, effectively giving or taking away a really small dose. I've never found a need to do so, but others have.

    As far as theme parks, I've had terrible luck with Disney, but Universal seems to be awesome. Ask for a Guest Assistance Pass (GAC) and ask for accommodations that you feel you need, such as using alternative entrances to rides, wait in air conditioning, etc. Getting a wheelchair may be a good idea. If there's a sudden low, or if your son does not do well in the heat, it's easier to wheel them out than carry them out. I think there's a guide to diabetes at Disney that someone can link, and that may be helpful.

    In any case, have fun! You can do what my family has all done: compare bg numbers to before and after rather thrilling rides to see the swings.
    And as far as those swings go, correct for the highs from adrenaline very carefully. They tend to come down very easily, especially if there's lots of walking.
     
  6. Bear

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    Here's what you do - don't worry about it. There's enough type 1s out there that the screeners see them often, if not daily. My DB has been on about ten flights with Ping and Dexcom and has never had an issue. He gets a quick patdown and they wave us through with our bag of vials and prickers.

    We've also never had an issue with abnormal highs or lows attributable to flying.

    Don't worry about it.
     
  7. teacherone

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    Hi there,

    I recently flew back home from San Francisco to Frankfurt alone with the two kids (one D one non D). It was easy. Children (in general) didn't have to go through the full body scanner at all. They just went through the normal metal detector.

    I told the security guy about Jacks pump and he just asked me to lift his shirt a bit so that he could have a look at it. He didn't touch anything at all.

    We usually take off the pump right after take off and push some insulin through in case of any bubbles due to the pressure change. It's probably not necessary, but we do it anyways.

    Best,
    Sarah
     
  8. Bear

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    Here's what you do - don't worry about it. There's enough type 1s out there that the screeners see them often, if not daily. My DB has been on about ten flights with Ping and Dexcom and has never had an issue. He gets a quick patdown and they wave us through with our bag of vials and prickers.

    We've also never had an issue with abnormal highs or lows attributable to flying.

    Don't worry about it.
     
  9. Tomdiorio

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    I'm not sure if it is true or not, but we disconnect DS pump before the cabin was pressurized, and before depressurization. Just to be safe. I know some pumps have a pressure relief built in, but we didn't want to take a chance.

    The pressure definitely will cause liquid to expand... Try taking a sippey cup that seals up in board, open it up after pressurization and it will explode all over. I know this from experience.
     
  10. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Many flights over the years and we've never disconnected for "pressure". I believe it's called a "pressurized cabin" for a reason ;)
     
  11. Tomdiorio

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    Hahaha.

    There ARE air pressure changes in the cabin. That's why some people's ears hurt. That is why a sippey cups can shoot liquid all over. If the pump doesn't have some sort of vent, the same thing happens with that. Albiet, it maybe a very small amount, but with a toddler that can be enough.
     

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