- advertisement -

Advice to parents for newly diagnosed children

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Cords, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. Cords

    Cords New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Dear All,

    My child (8 years) has recently been diagnosed with diabetes Type-1 and wanted to know what advice you could give to help! especially the problems i will face e.g. finding best foods, calorie counting etc for my son.

    Im also a student at University studying computer science so i used this situation to start building a mobile application to help parents with newly diagnosed children (as my dissertation).

    If you have any advice for me, or app ideas please, please help both me and others. Thank you so much! Cords
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    I would suggest you just focus on learning how to manage your son's health right now and leave developing an application for sometime when you've got a grasp of the matter.

    No need to count calories, it's carbs you will be counting. Ragnar Hanas' book, "Managing Type 1 Diabetes" is my favorite reference for new parents. Any recent edition will do.
     
  3. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    The first year is a whirlwind, with the first few months being overwhelming. My advice is listen and learn, and make notes about what helped you. Then down the road apply this to building an app.

    As for calorie counting, you don't. Carb counting, you do. Calorie King is great. There is an app, website and book. Best foods, well, as long as you had a healthy diet before, keep doing it. You can still do treats, but as it is for all of us, in moderation. If you can supply more info as to what your regimen is, then people can chime in to help on snacks (if you are allowed 15g free or carb free or low carb snacks).

    "Think Like a Pancreas" and "Managing Type 1 Diabetes" are incredibly helpful books, it helps you really understand what the heck is going on. Also, visit the home page here or the American Diabetes Association or JDRF pages for info about helping your child with diabetes in a school setting (working with staff, establishing a 504).
     
  4. danismom79

    danismom79 Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2008
    Messages:
    5,300
    When was your son diagnosed and what regimen is he on? Are you being taught how to count carbs? I agree with Sarah to focus on your son's health right now. I'm not sure how good of an app you can create if you're still brand new yourself. What kinds of issues have you run into so far? Maybe we could start there....
     
  5. Turtle1605

    Turtle1605 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2012
    Messages:
    353
    If your son has been diagnosed recently and you are getting ready to dive in to helping him, you will be learning to count a lot of carbs and learning how to calculate insulin dosages accurately. When we began, I tried to plan out 4 or 5 meals that I knew my son would eat. I counted out the carbs for those and alternated those for a while (2-4 weeks) to limit the effort and energy I had to put toward counting carbs of endless types of food and to see how his body was going to adjust to insulin dosages, etc. Luckily, he usually ate the same things for breakfast (bacon, eggs and wheat toast) and lunch (pb&j sandwich) every day. Then little by little, I added foods and treats. After about 6 months, he ate pretty much anything and everything (except for those things that aren't worth the trouble in battling high blood glucose levels...this will make sense to you with time). You will surprised how fast you can memorize an endless list of the number of carbs in foods.

    Get all the rest you can and know that you may experience some grieving, sadness, exhaustion and feeling overwhelmed...that is pretty "normal" in the process, but of course, everyone is different.

    Search this forum for any information you may need (there is a ton of information here) and feel free to ask any questions or vent.... :cwds:
     
  6. Lee

    Lee Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Messages:
    9,633
    Also, once you know more of what a parent of a T1 kid needs, search existing apps - there are many that are very helpful that parents use.
     
  7. quiltinmom

    quiltinmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,189
    My best advice for counting carbs is to do your best, but don't fret over 2 or 3 carbs. If you dont' know the EXACT count (we eat a lot of home made foods, things that don't come with a label) just make your best guess. It took me a long time before I realized that depending on the amount and the insulin carb ratio, it didn't really matter if I counted it as 30 or 35, because the shot would be the same regardless. (I don't know if I'm explaining this very well, sorry.) If it turns out to be more, he might need a little correction later, or if you over counted, he can have a little snack later.

    As for foods, you can probably just keep feeding him what you were feeding him before, assuming it was at least sorta healthy. A healthy diet for any other kid is a healthy diet for type 1 diabetic, for the most part.

    Last thing--dont' let Diabetes get in the way of having fun. I rarely don't allow DS to have something or do something because of D. Try to treat him the same as you did before D (with a few changes, like testing and giving insulin).


    Good luck! It's a steep learning curve, but you'll get through it.
     
  8. Cords

    Cords New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Thank you

    Thank you everyone for your replies! it really does mean a lot to be and sorry i did actually mean carbs rather than calories!.

    Thank you Sarah, I will definitely be looking after my child first and im lucky enough to have family who are able to support me during my final 4 months at university.

    Thanks for your advice Beach Bum! i looked for the app on the android market and couldnt find it! are you using iPhone?

    Danismom, my child has just been diagnosed with diabetes, which his mother took charge of. Carb counting will be taught to my family and child.

    Turtle, Lee and Quiltin, thank you for all your advice, you gus have been amazing! :) if you or anyone else has any more advice, feel free to comment! for me or other parents.
     
  9. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    Do you have any specific questions? It's a bit of a waste of time to just toss out our "advice" without knowing where you are in the process and what areas might be of particular concern.
     
  10. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    I use the iPhone, but Calorie King is supported on the following:
    iPhone
    Android
    BlackBerry
    Palm
    Windows Mobile
     
  11. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    You are doing better than I did. I was devestated when my daughter was dx and I can't imagine worrying about developing an app at that point in time. I was too focused on learning all the things I needed to learn and just doing all the things I needed to every day and night to take care of her.

    I agree with Sarah, it is much more helpful to ask specific questions here.

    Good luck
     
  12. steph

    steph Approved members

    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Messages:
    177
    i use the calorie counter app on my droid, and i have been pleased with it. the people who babysit my daughter have it on their phones too.

    i recommend just trying to feed your child a normal healthy diet that any other child his age should be eating, and through experience and trial and error, you will learn how his body responds to different foods and ammounts of carbs and insulin. Also, things change quite often, so keep an eye on BG trends be prepared for doses to change.

    Because type 2 runs in my family, i had it in my head that my daughter needed to limit sugar and carbs and have a very different diet, which is not the case at all. she eats mostly the same things she would without type 1 (with a few limitations).

    Best wishes to you and your family. everything is new and scary at first, but as you gain some experience and confidence it gets much more manageable.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice