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Adults who don't understand

Discussion in 'Teens' started by Gillybean2145, Mar 23, 2012.

  1. Gillybean2145

    Gillybean2145 Approved members

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    I was wondering if anyone had any advice about informing someone about diabetes. I am type 1, on a school sports team,14 years old and my coach doesn't really understand about blood sugars and stuff. I've tried explaining it to her but she doesn't take me seriously. I just need some advice about how to approach adults who don't understand without them thinking I'm just obnoxious. She thinks just because she is older, that she knows more about diabetes than me, the diabetic. This really frustrates me with adults in general because they usually aren't informed and when I tell them I'm diabetic, some of them even looked at me and said "But your not fat." It gets exasperating to explain it to them all the time and its really annoying when they think they are the experts cause they googled it...
     
  2. kinder23

    kinder23 Approved members

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    Ugh.. I know what you mean I hate it when people think they know more than you. Can you get one of your parents maybe and have them talk to your coach? When I was in 6th grade I had this principal my mom was talking to him about somthing I forgot but somthing about my diabetes and he says oh I know all about diabetes! And my mom says ok.what do you do if her blood sugar is in the 300's? And he immeditly replies and says I call 911!:rolleyes:

    that is just one example also one time in 6th grade I had this teacher who would give out candy but she would never give me any because I was a diabetic and I went up to her and said that it was okay for me to have candy if I bolus for it. And says I don't know because if I give you some then I will be up all night wondering if ur okay. (as if I was gonna die if I had one jolly rancher I think their are more odds of a normal person chocking on one and dieing than me dieing of a jolly rancher that I would of bolused for!) so instead she gave me a tiny blue stapler with purple staples in it. So being the kind of person who doesn't want to get into things like this, I walked away. Then later on in the school year she was handing out Popsicles and again she diddnt want to give me one so again I went up to her and said that I would be fine and that I could have it. But she goes I don't know I think we should talk to the nurse about this. So I walk with her all the way to the nurses office. And the nurse says yes she can have she will just have to bolus for it. So we walk back to the class and she says I still don't think I should let you have this so she give me a little pillow thingy instead. Anyways so those are just some of my examples. It just makes me so mad when people think that they know more than you if I wasn't able to control my temper I would punch these kind of people.
     
  3. blufickle

    blufickle Approved members

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    I am an adult type 1 of over 46 years. And I still get adults, some older some younger than me telling me what I can and cannot eat. What I can and cannot do. Unfortunately when some adults hear the word diabetic, they believe everyone of us are type 2, since that is what prevalent in the US now days. And in the past, like when I was a teen, eating sweets was not something a diabetic was allowed. Most diabetics did not know they could have more insulin to over the sweets, they didn't talk to their doctor about how to do things.

    I would suggest having your mother talk to your coach. Or better yet ask your doctor to send a letter explaining that you are the expert on your diabetes.

    It's a shame there are so many adults that think they are know it all's when all they are are idiots.
     
  4. MommaKat

    MommaKat Approved members

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    My dd was having the same problem with coaches, and she really likes to advocate for herself - not have mom step in. So, we came up with a business card size info piece for coaches. It's not filled with a ton, but has the med alert symbol, her name, type I diabetes for the title.
    Under that is a simple line: type I diabetics are at risk for high (hyperglycemia) and low (hypoglycemia) blood sugar levels during activity. I carry the following:
    meter & supplies, juice, fast acting glucose tabs, cake icing, and Glucagon
    I carry a blue Adidas bag, and my supplies are kept in a purple and white striped make up bag inside.
    I need to keep supplies nearby at all times, with the coach is usually best
    I may need to step out of practice or a game to test and treat,
    We can arrange a signal for this
    If I seem disoriented or out of it, please ask me to test.
    Then at the bottom in italics it says:
    If I fail to recognize and treat a low blood sugar, I could become disoriented, have seizures, or lose consciousness. This rarely happens, and with your help and understanding, I can keep it that way.

    We try to keep it simple and upbeat; she talks to them very briefly, and gives them the card. We have found that coaches are more willing to ask questions and talk after receiving it with some time to process. (That's when I can step in if dd wants me to.) Her basketball coach loved the card so much she asked us to bring two to every game for refs. Now, if dd signals her coach, the substitution is nearly immediate. (most of the time.) It's not like dd has to do it often, but it does happen.

    Wish your coach wasn't like that. It's one of my biggest irritations, too. I actually used to read the story Eleven by Sandra Cisneros with my fifth graders every year because it gave them a chance to express that frustration and troubleshoot how to deal with it. Hope you find something that works for you!!
     
  5. Connie(BC)Type 1

    Connie(BC)Type 1 Approved members

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    An Adult with Type 1, doesn't seem to exist for most people
     
  6. sarahspins

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    This is always going to be the case, and I can tell has nothing to do with age and everything to do with assumptions... people always assume they know MUCH more than they do because almost everyone knows "someone" with D, usually T2 but they don't even know there is a difference, and it's the rare individual who admits they don't know much about T1.

    I really like MommaKat's suggestion for a small card... it's very concise and I like that it wouldn't necessarily make someone feel like it's only for them if it seems like it's something you've given out before. All you are wanting is to be able to test yourself and treat lows without being harrassed about it or singled out, right? That should be pretty easy for most adults to accomodate without the need to add their insight/opinions, I think they just need a reminder that it's all you require from them :)

    Usually as an adult the most I tell people around me is that if I am unresponsive or acting confused, please don't hesitate to call 911 (typically this is in situations where I am with people I don't know very well, like group bike rides). I wear a medical ID, and that I typically don't fully inform people about my health history - it's on my wrist for anyone who actually needs to know to find (so far it's never been needed though).
     
  7. Gillybean2145

    Gillybean2145 Approved members

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    Thanks so much. I'm the same way, not really wanting to involve my parents because I know that it will be this way for the rest of my life, with people not understanding, and I want to be able to handle people like her and advocate for myself. The card is a really good idea and I think I will try to make one cause I have a some adults in my life like that.
     

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