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ADHD meds and T1D

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by wearingtaci, Aug 25, 2014.

  1. wearingtaci

    wearingtaci Approved members

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    When Sophie was diagnosed her endo took her off the ADHD meds she had been on. Now it is obvious she needs those. Does anyone have experience mixing T1D and ADHD. I'm concerned because when she was on Concerts she needed catapress to sleep. I was told that any sort of sleeping meds shouldn't be used with diabetics,but never why.I'm a bit concerned too about the loss of appetite,but I can always adjust insulin of needed
     
  2. StacyMM

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    My son is ADHD and diabetic and has used Concerta in the past. He's on Focalin right now, though.

    For us, the lack of appetite has been the biggest hurdle to overcome because we pre-bolus for lunch and that's the meal that is most likely to be impacted by the Focalin. I pack pretty consistent lunches so he knows about how many carbs are in everything and if he's not going to eat everything, he can subtract out a food, but I really try to match his lunch size to his appetite to make it easier. Have you considered a different medication that won't give her the sleeplessness? We had to switch once for sleeplessness issues - he'd wake up at 2:00 or 3:00 in the morning and spend an hour or two playing on his iPad and then go back to sleep for a few hours.

    The biggest impact of the medication on his diabetes is that he actually remembers to bolus! And his addition when counting carbs is so much better :)
     
  3. wearingtaci

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    we never tried anything but Concerta,so I guess that will be something we have to talk about. Sophie has never forgotten anything related to D,but she can't focus on anything else as well and has a lot of emotional outbursts without the meds
     
  4. Caldercup

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    Yeah, that!

    I basically had to load him up at breakfast (while he still had his appetite), pack him a small lunch of his favorites, and then wait for his appetite to return late in the evening.

    Otherwise, I saw no changes to his dosages/ratios, etc.
     
  5. nanhsot

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    Suppression of appetite is definitely the biggest problem, my son will literally just not eat, and obviously that's not healthy for many reasons; add in diabetes and it just complicates life.

    My son feels his meds make him more insulin resistant, but that's anecdotal. He's on Vyvanse.

    I am personally very resistant to him taking any sleep meds (we tried a lot of things before going on the ADD drugs, he had horrible insomnia too) because medicated sleep is more likely to suppress his natural adrenaline response to a low and I feared him might not wake up. Of course he lives in a dorm but I'd feel that way at home too. He has a very high sensitivity to lows and I personally fear that medicating sleep would make him less likely to wake up for a low.

    The ADD drugs need to be taken early in the day, as long as that happens generally sleep issues haven't been a problem (and before the drugs it was a HUGE problem). For him sleep has improved.

    I am so very against ADD drugs as a rule but it's been absolutely necessary for him. Good luck.
     
  6. Caldercup

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    Also -- and this is important both for the ADD and the sleep issues -- promote exercise!

    I have ADD myself, and exercise has been amazing for giving me better clarity of thought, plus it helps me fall asleep at night and stay asleep. (I don't take any meds because I wasn't diagnosed until I was in my late 40s, and I had enough coping mechanisms that some behavioral modification helped me.)

    But... for the life of me, I can't get my 18 year old to join us at the gym. I think that is adding to the problem of him staying awake late at night, which means he takes his ADD meds too late in the morning for them to properly wear off by bed time. It's a vicious cycle....
     
  7. quiltinmom

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    Or it could be that she is 11 and most girls are like that at that age....I am not saying she doesn't have ADHD but just that maybe what she is doing is normal for her and doesn't need to be "fixed" with meds. Just a thought. The fact that she does her d related things shows that she can focus when it is important enough to her. ADHD is definitely real but doesn't always need to be medicated, IMO. But of course, you are her mother and know what is best for her. I'm not trying to sound judging about it. I just wanted to suggest alternative possibilities.

    Good luck! D is a tricky juggling act by itself! I don't envy those that have other issues added to the mix.
     
  8. Caldercup

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    I have probably had ADD my whole life. I managed to discover coping mechanisms that helped me get through school, find a job and build a happy life. I was lucky.

    My son, however, never figured out ways to settle his mind, and it got so bad at one point (before he was diagnosed) that he suffered deep self-doubt and considered suicide. The difference for him pre- and post-meds is like night and day. For him, they make all the difference in the world.

    The OP stated her daughter's "endo took her off the ADHD meds she had been on. Now it is obvious she needs those."

    If she needs them, she needs them.
     
  9. quiltinmom

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    I agree. I bet meds would've helped you back then, but you managed without them. People weren't given meds so freely back then. So you figured it out without them. If you had them, then they were taken away, it probably would have been a noticeable difference.

    These days people seem to jump straight to medicating when sometimes kids can adapt/manage instead. But sometimes people can't manage alone, so they need medications. There is nothing wrong with that. Not as a comment about the OP, but just in general, it seems kids are way over medicated.

    Diabetes doesnt have degrees of severity like ADHD does. Every type I person needs insulin, period. But ADHD has a spectrum, So sometimes medication isn't needed. If I had a cwd whose dr suggested meds, I would personally try everything else first, especially if the meds would make diabetes harder to manage. Same for a kid without d, too.

    Another thing to consider, people all have different gifts. Being organized and focused isn't everyone's gift. Some people are more scattered. But that doesn't mean they need to be "fixed." Aren't all 11 year old girls highly emotional? Sometimes it is a part of who we are. For some, it would be a shame to try and change that. Speaking from experience, some kids naturally have a harder time focusing or controlling their emotions, but not all of them need medicine to change them.

    I'm not trying to tell the op what to do, merely making a suggestion based on my opinion. But caldercup, you do make a good point. I'm not trying to disprove you in any way. There are those who need meds and should definitely take them. I'm definitely not to trying to tell the OP what to do, merely making a possible suggestion.
     
  10. wearingtaci

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    She has been back on meds for just over a week now. So far appetite hasn't been much of a problem. She is however noticeably happier and more productive at school. Her teacher called me 5 days after going back to Concerts to say how much better she was doing. For the record we did try many non drug strategies in the almost 2 years she wan not on meds
     
  11. Caldercup

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    Good! I'm glad she got the help she needed, and I'm glad her teacher sees the improvement as well.
     
  12. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I'm trying to think how I'd feel if someone told me that I could manage my kid's Type 1 without "meds". How if I cut most carbs and added supplements then she wouldn't need her "meds" and then if she did start needing them I could really really keep her from needing too much "meds" by going pale.
    (rollie)

    Can't imagine what gives anyone any reason to assume that a parent who is assessing medication options for their child, under Drs supervision and with a Drs prescription would somehow need a 3rd party internet lecture on the nuance of managing said condition.

    To the OP, I'm glad she's off to a good school start. :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2014
  13. DavidN

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    I didn't think quiltinmom was giving a lecture at all. She appeared to me to go out of her way to not give a lecture. The comparison with Type 1 Diabetes is silly and a tad hostile. Type "ADHD mistaken for ..." into Google and a zillion hits come up. Site after site tells about up to 10 or more conditions that can and oftentimes do get diagnosed and treated as ADHD. quiltmom was just simply saying that ADHD is commonly misdiagnosed, because, well, it is. By now you should know that just because a doctor says it doesn't make it so. I will go out of my way to state unequivocally that yes, ADHD does exist and many children benefit from medication. I'll write that again. ADHD does exist and many children GREATLY benefit from medication. However, many kids are emotionally immature, have sensory issues, have dyslexia, anxiety etc ... etc ... but the first move for many doctors is to whip out the Connors Assessment, check a box, label it ADHD and write a script. quiltinmom bringing that up is not that controversial. At my son's school last year, 1/3rd of the boys in his grade were on ADHD meds. One third! And that's just the ones that I know about from the parents or the kids themselves. It could be more. I don't know with certainty, but I would be stunned if all of those boys actually have ADHD and need to be medicated. Sharing my observation doesn't mean I'm lecturing anyone on this board or saying anyone on this board has misdiagnosed their child.
     
  14. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I think that if one goes back to the OP's post it's clear that she wasn't looking for advice on how to treat her child's ADD/ADHD but for how to meld managing Type 1 with previously prescribed ADD/ADHD medications. I think at that point it was totally inappropriate for someone to offer their opinion of the "state of overmedication". While she purported not to be judging and superficially qualified her stance, I think she was without question suggesting that the OP might be "medicating" without cause. I'm not even sure that "Quitingmom" has any firsthand experience with this but the emphasis on "medicating" struck me as judgmental despite all the claims to the contrary.

    My kid has Type 1, as such I "medicate" her and I'm bloody well glad that that's an option. If my kid had ADD or any other condition I sure as hell wouldn't want some other parent implying that I hadn't done the most primary research and hadn't considered the most pedestrian concerns regarding their treatment.
     
  15. DavidN

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    I went back and read OP's post and the thread. If I'm wearingtaci, and I do all the research I possibly can on ADHD and how to treat my daughter, and after that long process I decide to put her on medication, then to answer your original post about how would you feel if someone questioned the treatment (and you're right, the questioning wasn't direct but by bringing it up its implied), I'd be annoyed. And my staunch defense of quiltinmom, which is also an implied questioning (wasn't intentional I can assure you, but insensitive and I apologize), would annoy me too. I should have assumed from the get go that wearingtaci did all of the available research that she possible could. She said nothing that would lead me to believe otherwise.

    Funny what a good nights sleep can do.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2014
  16. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    "Type 1 Parent gets good nights sleep! Citizens stunned!

    You buried the lead, David!! LOL, gotta love a good nights sleep ;-)
     
  17. Megnyc

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    I'm so glad to hear that she is doing better!

    My brothers all take vyvanyse for ADHD and sometimes use melatonin at night if they are having trouble sleeping. I know it works very well for them. I take melatonin semi-frequently as well (due to working night shifts, sleeping during the day, and then having difficulty getting back to a normal sleep schedule) and don't have any difficulty waking up to my cell phone or dexcom alarms. I actually typically wake up to the dexcom when it vibrates and I am a pretty heavy sleeper. Just something you might consider speaking to her endo/pediatrician about if you notice difficulty sleeping.
     

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