- advertisement -

11 yo girl crazy blood sugars puberty coming?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by dpr, Nov 14, 2016.

  1. dpr

    dpr Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2013
    Messages:
    399
    My daughter will be 11 in 2 months. For the last 2-3 months we've been getting completely random crazy highs. Sneaking food hasn't been an issue, if she helps herself to something with carb she's really good about bolusing.

    The highs come pretty much any time and are REALLY stubborn. Lately when the high starts she'll be in range, nice and flat then for no apparent reason Dex will go to double arrows up and if we're not extremly agressive she'll hit the 300-400 range in an hour. Corrections are literally 5 to 10 times the normal ammount of insulin to get it under control.

    She isn't showing any physical signs of puberty but I'm guessing this is what the beginning looks like? For those that have already been through it what should we expect?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    Hold on to your hat, puberty has entered the building.

    From about 11-13 the amount of insulin my daughter used was beyond crazy. We had to increase our order to ensure we had enough insulin.
    Basals almost doubled in some cases, along with having to frequently tweak sensitivity factors. We also found that when her cycles were starting her BG's went up and stayed up. I ended up doing an additional basal program just for those days.

    I found that tracking really helped and keeping in touch with our team. I was sending numbers in about every two weeks and they were helpful and creative in helping me make educated adjustments.
     
  3. kim5798

    kim5798 Approved members

    Joined:
    May 7, 2009
    Messages:
    745
    Insulin needs can increase a lot as puberty hits. You may see, if you track it, that it will go in cycles even before she has a menstrual cycle.

    I would say test often. Knowledge is power:)
     
  4. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    Messages:
    1,365
    Not much to add here, other than to second the recommendation to hold onto your hat during the long ride on the puberty roller coaster. I guess we were "lucky" in that my daughter didn't start her period until recently at age 14. I keep trying to get her to look on the bright side: she can pretty much predict when her period is going to start by the 2 to 3 days of crazy highs requiring triple digit TDDs.
     
  5. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,739
    Puberty changed everything up within a month for us. It was crazy. I changed basals almost daily based on how the cgm was tracking during the night. She'd climb and climb with insulin needs and then do a fast sudden drop that ALWAYS happened at bedtime with feeding sessions that could last for hours as she slept. By the time things calmaed down, I'd developed a formula to tell me how much to increase or decrease basal by.

    Since you're using MM already, have you placed your order for an upgrade? If not, I would ASAP. You might actually get to sleep through puberty.
     
  6. dpr

    dpr Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2013
    Messages:
    399
    Thanks everyone that's what I was afraid of, the fun is just starting. We currently have the new 630G pump and will upgrade to the 670 artifical pancreas when it comes out. Hopefully that will help with it's automatic bolus's.
     
  7. nebby3

    nebby3 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2007
    Messages:
    923
    Pre puberty was worse than puberty for us. When dd's cycle started there was more regularity to it all. She's 14 now so maybe we still have bad times coming but I would definitely say 11 was harder than 14.
     
  8. dpr

    dpr Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2013
    Messages:
    399
    We've been going through some really crazy highs. Any time of the day and the last 2 nights have been the worse highs we've ever had with the corrections double or more than the biggest I've ever given her. Some really rough nights with more to come in sure...
     
  9. Ali

    Ali Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,217

    It really depends on the person:):) So for some females and some males hormones settle down, for others they do not. I was one with very strong hormonal changes that really impacted my insulin needs for all of my life, even post menopause my hormones impact me:):) So if you think adapting to your kids needs is hard or your kid says I am finding this hard, push your Dr to look into the hormonal aspects of your kids insulin needs...this is not true for everyone with T1 but for many of us this is a big factor and you need to get your endo and if a female their Gyn to explore and test and look at ways of helping.
     
  10. msschiel

    msschiel Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2013
    Messages:
    227
    My son will be 14 in March and this past week has been a nightmare!!! He had a cold/sinus infection which he is now feeling better, but highs that won't come down, even with multiple corrections and temp basals. He finally comes down with a manual injection, but then he tends to crash, even with no IOB on board! I just looked at his dexcom information and it showed a pattern of highs for almost a week. Eating was a bit interrupted with the holiday weekend, but it wasn't off that bad! Thank goodness for dexcom, even though the alarms drive me nuts at night.

    I am on hold with the endo right now.
     
  11. MEVsmom

    MEVsmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2013
    Messages:
    255
    This thread is my life right now. My daughter just turned 11 in October. For the past couple of weeks, she has needed insane amounts of insulin to bring her BG into a reasonable range. Then at bedtime, she plummets downward despite decreased dosing for a bedtime snack. I end up spending the next two hours giving her things to bring the number up.

    It might cause my husband to lose his mind. I threaten to take his Share privileges away. Our endo has been warning us that once puberty or pre-puberty starts that we will be doubling insulin dosing every week....or it will seem that way. Reading that others go through the same issues does help deal with it.
     
  12. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,739
    It does get better, but those nights can be the loneliest times in the world. I was fortunate to make a friend with a daughter the same age through CWD, so we did lots of comparing during that stage. A mom of an older teen told me at that stage, "You're going to need support even more than your child." I don't know about the child bit, but I did.

    It's a whirlwind. You'll go from crazy puberty to them being so busy with activities that diabetes doesn't seem to get many blips on their radar to trying to make sure they've got the skills to leave home. I'm so glad most of the APs should be through the FDA about the time mine will launch from home! No night duty for her...or me!

    My husband doesn't have Share privileges. I only use them at night. Daytimes are my break...and she's on top of things. There's a big difference at each age. She tells me not to look during the day so that I don't stress.
     
  13. sarahspins

    sarahspins Approved members

    Joined:
    May 5, 2009
    Messages:
    2,205
    I don't really have specific advice for dealing with T1 and puberty but I just wanted to chime in and back this up.... I am also one with "wider" hormonal swings throughout my cycle and my insulin needs can vary SUBSTANTIALLY..... not anything close to the 10-20% variance that other people suggest is "normal" - I will need 2X (or more) as much insulin after ovulation, and after my period starts, sometimes I feel like I'm just "feeding" my basal coverage, when it's already been cut by two thirds... I jokingly say that it's like chasing a moving target, because it really is.

    It has been easier since I've been using Loop though, since it can proactively reduce and increase my basal rates for me based on what my dexcom says, rather than me just reacting to whatever is happening after the fact, but it is at times, still a struggle when my needs fall well outside of what it is able to do (there are limits on dosing amounts, for safety).
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice