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10 Things Your Endo Never Told You.

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Christopher, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. obtainedmist

    obtainedmist Approved members

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    The reason you can correct more often with the pump (or you can try to) is that the pump keeps track of the corrections and won't let you stack. If you try to correct, it will tell you the amount you can, or tell you that you shouldn't. Though the pump is more convenient, what I feel is best about it is that you are able to vary your basal rates to cover the way your body works...and to adjust to different activity levels on any specific day. With Lantus, one has to consume more carbs in order to do certain activities. With the pump, one can lower the basal rate an hour or so ahead of time and for an extended period. Or, one can disconnect altogether and receive no basal insulin for a time. On the flip side, one can increase the basal rate if one is sick or has ketones...or is having a hard time lowering a high for any reason.
     
  2. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    You can calculate IOB without a pump. I do it.
     
  3. Stefanie S.

    Stefanie S. Approved members

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    Wonderful thread. And, as a newbie, I have to give our endo/CDE some props because they did tell us a lot of these tips. And they gave us two meters which test the blood keytones. :D
     
  4. deafmack

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    These tips are awesome. I think they should be listed in one post so that
    they can be read by all parents as well as those with diabetes. Some I already knew but having them in one place would be a great idea.
     
  5. steph

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    I find this post so rude and insensitive. If pens work for you, that's great, but insulting people for whom they do not work is completely uncalled for. The truth is, pens leak. Accurately dropping a dose on a scale for the purpose of a study means nothing if you can't get that amount into your child's body. In an adolescent, the tiny amount that leaks out might not make that much of a difference, but when your child weighed 20lbs at dx like mine did, and .5u can lower BG by 150 points, then that tiny amount makes a huge difference. I don't think of myself as a "control freak", I just want my daughter to feel as good as possible. When my DD needs 1.25u for a meal, I know that I can more accurately administer that than trying to round up or down with a pen and then having an unknown amount leak out. This thread is supposed to be about offering advice from experience, not about insulting people who have different experiences than you do.
     
  6. kim5798

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    I'm not sure why you feel insulted by this. Are you a pediatric nurse? He was quoting a study/book by a respected Dr in the diabetes community. Everyone has a preference. The topic is "things your endo never told you". A lot of endos might not bring up pens, and pens work for a lot of folks.

    I agree that for a 20 lb child...using a pen probably would not have been my choice either. I remember doing 1/4 units on syringes that did not have half unit markings....because they didnt make them at the time my kid was diagnosed. Lets talk about an error rate there.... Or how about the endo telling us, do one unit & a hair past...as a dose. Lets just say that moms and dads have different ideas of what a "hair past" looks like & then we will talk about errors in a 25 pound kid.
     
  7. Momontherun

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    Great thread!
    It gave me much insight into the art of managing your child's diabetes.
     
  8. DsMom

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    Bumping this up for new members...wish I knew how to link things.:(:eek:
     
  9. sgh

    sgh Approved members

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    a few more

    1) This is really important: you can get high ketones with normal blood sugar-- caused by dehydration. I learned this the hard way, in the ER. Keep sick kids well hydrated if possible. Especially toddlers. Since my son turned 4 we haven't ended up in the ER, but before that, EVERY time he threw up, we ended up in the ER due to ketones from dehydration.

    2) Test blood sugar on the sides of fingers, it hurts less.
    3) Skip the pinkies. I only use the middle/ring fingers actually. Hurts less.
    4) you can reuse lancets.
    5) A few others have mentioned, blood sugar will increase with fat or protein as well as carbs.
    6) It *will* get easier if you have a newly diagnosed toddler. Really. Hang in there and as my diabetes educator said, "just keep them conscious."
    7) get on a pump and cgms as soon as possible.
     
  10. sgh

    sgh Approved members

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    and also...

    1) in the ER, don't expect anything to happen quickly. You should manage BG yourself. Once the ER nurse checked his BG and came back *one hour later* to tell me it was low. I just laughed; of course I had already tested and treated him myself. Even during surgery/any hospitalization, you should be there and be in control the whole time.

    2) I don't know if this is still true, but tylenol used to interfere with a dexcom. Not sure if this is true now or if it interferes with other cgms systems as well?

    3) Once you think you have everything figured out, you will find that something major will go wrong. It's very humbling!

    4) Children under age 10 or so do *not* generally wake up from low blood sugar. My son never has, he's 8. As an adult I generally do (but I'm wondering what will happen the first time I don't...) My endo told me this; I'm not sure if it's based on data or experience or what...

    5) Sleep/growth hormones may make blood sugar rise-- my son's BG often seems to go up as soon as he falls asleep, especially when he was a toddler. A cgms is really the only way to get a handle on this, because it varies day by day.
     
  11. LoveMyHounds

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    That I have the new boss now - the school nurse. And from now my DD and I will be doing whatever she wants.

    Sorry, just a vent. Bad day today.
     
  12. sgh

    sgh Approved members

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    another one

    I don't think I saw this mentioned: if you have sugar/food on your hands, it will mess up your BG reading. For the first years I always washed my hands so I never thought about it, then got lazy and didn't always wash, then noticed some odd high readings, finally found out that if I had touched food it could throw off the reading. Sort of a "duh," but I darn near almost killed myself because I didn't know this (I almost corrected a false high when on a hike many miles from anywhere when almost out of food... I wasn't high, I was low, just had raisin remnants on my hands).

    Just learned this: that if you don't know if a drink is sugar-free or not, you can test it with your BG meter. "Low" will be sugar-free, otherwise it will show a reading.
     
  13. madde

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    this should be a "sticky"
     
  14. LoveMyHounds

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    We tried this once and it didn't work :confused:. Just wasted one strip :rolleyes:
     
  15. Ali

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    I am so sorry for you. I had to reply to this post. If you post more details I am sure someone can help. I can not help except as a parent of three who discovered that by my third I had a better sense of what was nonsense and what I might want to listen to from others and so ended up with much fewer problems with my number two and number three child. So hoping some others with T1 kids can help you out. :cwds:ali
     
  16. type1moms

    type1moms Approved members

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    Words to avoid

    Try not to say that your child "suffers" from diabetes - your child "lives" with diabetes. Also, I've found that some people - especially older page - find the word "diabetic", as in he is a diabetic.
     
  17. LucyAmber

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    bumping for newbies
     
  18. Michelle'sMom

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    Perhaps because on some meters, you'll get an error instead?
     
  19. denise3099

    denise3099 Approved members

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    I wish the endo told me that a cure is NOT 5 to 10 years away, no matter who says so! :(
     
  20. obtainedmist

    obtainedmist Approved members

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    That right after dx, your hair might fall out a bit :-( and you might get some temporary swelling in your legs/ankles! These two things upset our daughter more than anything else...and the fact that we weren't prepared for them made it worse! Things resolved themselves as her body regained weight and health--but even the Fellows on call didn't know about the water retention possibility once an insulin regime was started! I had to Google to get an explanation!
     

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