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10 Things Your Endo Never Told You.

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Christopher, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. denise3099

    denise3099 Approved members

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    That the only and best place you will really learn about D is on the children with diabetes website! :cwds: This is where you will get your most useful information. This is where I refer every new person I meet. I just ran into an newly dx kid/parent at 5 Below, dx in August. This is the first thing I told her. Go to CWD--that is where you will learn what you need to know. :)
     
  2. thebestnest5

    thebestnest5 Approved members

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    I wish our endo would have discussed:

    The emotional side of diabetes is just as important. No one wants to feel like a number or that they are constantly being judged because of them. BG numbers are information, and should be treated that way-- not as pass/fail or good/bad. If your child had perfect numbers all time, then they wouldn't have diabetes.

    Ellen has posted the only appropriate response to a high bg, is "Thank you for testing."
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2012
  3. manda81

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    This was a big one for us in the beginning as well. I think we finally learned it after about 5 months, and I can't really blame my endo, because I probably just didn't understand what the told me, but yeah.

    Insulin for food-anytime, every 30 mins if that's what you want!

    Insulin for correction-only if it's been 3-4 hours since your last shot/bolus.
     
  4. serge28

    serge28 Approved members

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    We should let our endos to read this thread, so they can educate parents with newly diagnosed children. :)

    We found that we need to cover fat and protein (usually by increasing the basal) as well. They cause spikes in 2-3 hours if not covered.
     
  5. sisterbeth43

    sisterbeth43 Approved members

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    Lots of good info here. My dd passed out in the shower once after she had taken insulin shortly before. Luckily she didn't hit her head when she fell. Also, for the parents of girls approaching or in puberty, (I know your favorite topic, Chris), their bgs may start going up a week before their menses actually start.
     
  6. DsMom

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    Never heard of the hot bath issue, and have given my son baths after breakfast many times. Have not noticed an issue, but maybe will check his BG the next few times!

    As for tips...injecting Lantus in the butt can help ease the sting. Did not know this until a nurse educator associated with our insurance company told me. Made our evenings tear free from then on!

    Also, severe diarrhea can cause severe lows! Learned the hard way years ago and was clueless why I couldn't get my son's lows to come up for hours no matter how many carbs I gave him. Ended up at the hospital...where I found out it was the diarrhea. So, tread carefully with diarrhea, and check very frequently. Cutting way down on insulin may be necessary...we even gave him whole meals uncovered for a few days...and definitely did NOT pre-bolus.

    Similarly, expect BGs to be wonky for many days after an illness. My son got sick (vomiting) a few days before Christmas...yesterday was the first "normal" day we had since then. Prepare for sick days BEFORE sick days occur...and know what to expect from BGs and how to respond. We used 20-30% increased basal rates to deal with the high BGs...and LOTS of testing...almost every 2-3 hours for a few days.

    Also did not know then that sugar-free is not always the best option. Some of those treats have as many or more carbs than sugar treats.

    Great thread. Wish I had something like this after dx.
     
  7. zoomom456

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    Another thing about sugar free, some people and particularly little ones, can be sensitive to sugar free products. Too many sugar free products can cause horrible diarrhea. I wish my endo mentioned that at diagnosis.
     
  8. MamaBear

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    We had stomach issues with sugar free candies, mainly russell stovers chocolates I bought him for a movie night. I got the same so he wouldn't feel bad, and what a disaster! They were twice the carbs of regular candies, and we both had horrible stomach aches. I won't buy sugar free candy again!

    We do however have good luck with sugar free maple syrup , jello, and pudding. :cwds:
     
  9. OSUMom

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    Ditto. I was going to mention Zofran which we'd never heard of until this site. Also, ds started pumping right away. Yes - excellent thread because those living with type 1 often have the best advice over what the doctor communicates. ;)
     
  10. momandwifeoftype1s

    momandwifeoftype1s Approved members

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    You will get a huge prescription with tons of diabetes supplies on it after diagnosis. Have your doctor or CDE go through the list with you at the hospital to determine which items need to be filled right away, and which ones can wait. Otherwise, you'll go to the pharmacy and fill hundreds of dollars worth of prescriptions all at once when you really could spread out the cost over time.

    Check with your insurance company to find out what brand of blood glucose strips are cheapest and pick a meter from that tier with the smallest blood sample size and highest accuracy.
     
  11. MamaBear

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    Oh YES! Very very good point! We will not even talk about how many boxes of lancets I have right now. :rolleyes:
     
  12. momandwifeoftype1s

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    Yep. Been there, done that. Still have umpteen gazillion boxes of lancets and syringes.
     
  13. Ndiggs

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    Check and find the lancet/meter combo that works best for you. We use accu-check multi clicks and a one touch meter (ping) as we did not like the one touch lancet device.

    Ask your insurance company if its better to get your supplies on DME or Pharmacy benefits, one way could save you a TON of money over the other (DME for us is covered 100% for everything, pharm would have a $20.00 copay per item.)

    Also check with your state if there is a insurance program that the state runs for kids even if you think you make too much money. Here is MI, Children's Special Health is available to all families with kids that have a qualifying diagnose, and is set on a sliding scale, and provides 100% coverage for the qualifying diagnose. For us it picks up our Co-pays on insulin ect
     
  14. obtainedmist

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    That a newly dx'd CWD can experience major hair loss as a result of the high bgs. That once insulin is started, there can be some swelling in the extremities for a while until the body gets used to functioning normally again.
     
  15. MTMomma

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    Some blurred vision may occur when blood sugar levels start to be in a lower range soon after dx
     
  16. emm142

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    That you might not feel hypos. (I completely freaked out when I had my first low, a 68, and there were no symptoms. I rang my mum like "they said I'd feel shaky!!!" hahahah.)
     
  17. virgo39

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    You will find yourself waiting for the latest annual edition of Calorie King (which comes in a large print version, very handy for home and the school nurse), like some men wait for the Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition. This is normal ... right?

    You may have to split the Lantus dose, and there's no reason your DC has to be awake for both shots.

    There are some mathematical formulae for calculating ISF, I:C, etc. that while not 100% accurate, can provide a useful starting point.
     
  18. Jake's mom in NC

    Jake's mom in NC Approved members

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    I agree with the importance of night checks, everynight, not once in a while like my endo suggested. Also, it was 6 months before my CDE mentioned that bolusing 10 minutes BEFORE meals can prevent or reduce post meal spikes. My ds was spiking into the 300's because I waited to bolus him until after he ate and I counted the carbs up. His HA1C went from 8.6 at diagnosis only down to 8.4 after 6 months of what I thought was intensive management and I didn't know why!!! It was very frustrating.
     
  19. Connor's Mom

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    We were told to subtract the sugar alcohols from the carbs when we count them. What they didn't tell us is that some people are sensitive to the sugar alcohols just like regular carbs and you might NOT be able to subtract them. Now we subtract half the sugar alcohols and not all of them if he has sugar free foods.

    We also have problems with fountain Diet Mountain Dew. Not sure why but it raises his BG all the same.
     
  20. NatCat

    NatCat Approved members

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    If you or your child is waking up higher than you were when you went to sleep, and your giving what should be a substantial amount of insulin maybe what may seem like too much insulin, it may be your liver. ;)

    No, nothing is wrong with the liver, in fact this means that it's functioning as it should.

    What's happening is that your blood sugar is going drastically low during the night, and you're not waking up in response to the low. So obviously you can't treat it.

    When this happens your body naturally reacts to keep you from slipping into a comatose state. Your liver stores glycogen, which is eventually turned in to fat if it isn't used. I your blood sugar goes too low, liver will automatically convert the glycogen into glucose and sends it out , the body. This often results in over correction on the liver's part, and then you've got a mystery high on your hands. Checking for lows during the night can easily remedy this.

    And they say there's no need to test at night... Silly doctors.

    I was appalled that I had been dealing with this problem for almost three years unknowingly, when someone finally got a clue and told me about this. I started checking at night more frequently, and sure enough I would be low. I tend to go low at night pretty often, and strangely enough it was causing my highs.
     

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