advertisement
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Flu Shot

  1. #1

    Default Flu Shot

    Are your kids going to student health services to get a flu shot? The first (and only) time my son got the flu shot, he ended up with a low grade fever and body aches for the weekend. He has since refused to get one but I'd like him to get it.

  2. #2

    Default

    Dean came home a week ago for 24 hours to buy a used xbox 360 from a friend and Halo 3. I called all the pharmacies around trying to get him in to get a flu shot (no appointments available) - turns out his family doctor squeezed him in for the shot. I was thrilled (simple things really excite me ) as I wasn't sure how for him to get it at OSU exactly.

    So, yes, Dean has gotten his - no side effects, and he got one last year also.

    We're headed to Ohio State this weekend for family weekend. We didn't do this last year. Can't wait!
    son/26 dx'd 6/06 Pumping Novolog: Omnipod and Dex G4

  3. #3

    Default

    the flu shot has always been a weird issue to me. when my son was preschool/toddler, the endo would suggest he get one. i would have a hard time convincing our PCP to give him this shot---their argument being he is too young for it? i probably got him the shot 3 times as a child and every year he had it, he would get sick....coincidence maybe. but twice we were in the ER for hydration due to flu; and those were flu shot years. so, i figured why bother???? never got him the shot again, even at the urging of his endo. no way.

    he had perfect attendance in school for years -- probably 8 straight years -- hospitalized once for pump install. no shot, no flu.

    hope i didn't just jinx him.

  4. #4

    Default

    I'm getting one at the endo's office whenever I next see him (probably in the next two weeks).
    -Jonah
    dx age 17, now 25
    on Lantus for 7 years; on minimed 530 G since 12/7/13

  5. Thumbs up definitely get one

    I work in a student health center at a major university. I would definitely suggest flu shots. It is a shame to see a student get the flu and miss a week of school when it could be prevented (most of the time, the flu shot is not a guarantee). My son who is a freshman at the same university. He was diagnosed with type one in 2006, pumping since this summer. He always gets one. Side effects are generally minimal.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    578

    Exclamation Flu Kills 36,000 Americans *every Year*

    Read that number again. It's about the same as all motor vehicle accidents combined. It's about 9x as big as all the Iraq USA Servicemen casualties (since the beginning, not just this year).

    Yeah, most of them are old. (Like me.) But flu isn't anything like a cold, it's extremely dangerous. Especially for us diabetics on insulin-- when your body tries fighting flu, your caloric needs go up-- but your might develop severe nauseau, and not be able to hold down any food. bG files all over the place, DKA is a real risk. If those complications occur, you need to go in-patient quickly- because flu isn't just unpleasant, it kills.

    I don't like getting my shot in a sloppy "assembly line", but I get one every single year. (One way or another: this year's was at my Endo's, last year was one of those supermarket "Assembly Line" HMO-sponsored thingies...). I do it for myself, my insurance (which shouldn't be paying for unnecessary, avoidable, in-patient stays), and my community, which benefits by having a high proportion of "flu-proof" residents.
    Last edited by rickst29; 01-04-2008 at 08:58 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Lower Burrell, PA
    Posts
    587

    Default Flu shot - questionable at best

    Well, if you are considering a flu shot here are a few things to think about. (Of that 36,000 deaths I wonder how many of those got a flu shot. I know of at least one).

    Direct from the CDC -
    " The flu shot: The viruses in the flu shot are killed (inactivated), so you cannot get the flu from a flu shot. Some minor side effects are..."

    Well, the first time I got one I was down for a week with a super fever and chills. And as some of you mentioned, you got very sick after getting a shot. No question in your mind it was from the shot.

    So that begs the question - Why?
    How can killed viruses cause such a reaction?
    Somebody is lying.

    The typical argument is "why not get one...". Well, notice no one ever talks about what is in a flu vaccine. Getting one is not without a price. Typical ingredients are mercury, aluminum, formaldehyde, components of anti-freeze. These substances are obviously not good in any quantity and do accumulate in the body.

    Another reason you will still get the flu even with a flu shot -
    The flu viruses used in the vaccine are A and B strains. That's fine.
    Except these viruses happen to be the ones that mutate the most of any such viruses. So that means in a typical flu season, there can be 100s of different strains of flu viruses floating around (one year had an estimated 864 strains). The odds of you encountering only the two in the vaccine is very slim. Result..you'll probably get the flu anyway.

    If you're gonna get it, get naturally -
    If you get any flu naturally, you now have permanent life-long immunity to that particular strain. The more people that get it, the more you won't get it. It's referred to as natural herd immunity. It's is how diseases are naturally wiped out. Not vaccines. Can't say that for any flu shot.

    There is usually a reason things are pushed heavily onto the public, and I do not believe it's in our best interest.

    Oh yes, ask your doctor if he and his family gets a flu shot every year.

    Take care.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    37

    Default

    My daughter got hers at her endo appt. in November. He always advises her to have one. So far no problems.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    578

    Angry Good question. Bad guess at the answer, and "BS Alert" is required for your post.

    Quote Originally Posted by My_Dana View Post
    So that begs the question - Why?
    How can killed viruses cause such a reaction?
    Somebody is lying.
    Nobody is lying. The killed viruses still have a bunch of antigens which your body will recognize as "foreign" and mount an attack against. That's how all vaccines work. Polio, Tetanus, Flu, Whooping Cough, Rubella, .... all of them.

    By giving your body a chance to see the antigen and create antibodies against it, your body will be able to restart the same response much faster and more strongly than the first time. (That's also why, if you develop a reaction on your FIRST exposure to a penicillin or similar drug, your SECOND exposure is the one which quickly becomes life-threatening.)

    Some people, such as my wife, react so fast and so strong that even the initial shot (of killed virus) makes for a pretty bad illness. For these people, taking only a tiny bit of vaccine would be much better-- but your Dr. and Clinic have to give the full dose, for liability reasons. So, like you, she doesn't take it. But almost anyone who has only the kind of reaction which "normal" people have (a little soreness, maybe a bit of fever), should get it.

    I agree with you about excessive mercury used (as preservative) in vaccine production-- but for anybody who doesn't react like my wife, the benefit outweighs the risk. Also note that people like you and my wife are "freeloaders", depending on people like ME (who did get our shots), to prevent a Pandemic if a strain like 1918 comes around again. She (and maybe you) need to be selfish because of the side effects for you, but it is a bit greedy and selfish to enjoy the benefit of reduced "outbreaks" in your community while not doing your share to help create that community resistance to flu.

    Quote Originally Posted by My_Dana View Post
    If you get any flu naturally, you now have permanent life-long immunity to that particular strain. The more people that get it, the more you won't get it. It's referred to as natural herd immunity. It's is how diseases are naturally wiped out. Not vaccines. Can't say that for any flu shot.
    That's total BS. Polio has been wiped out, by the vaccine. And smallpox has been wiped out, by the vaccine. Can you name a single specific disease which has been wiped out by this so-called "herd immunity" in historical times? (No, of course you can't.) And as you correctly pointed out, flu changes every year. So even if you and a lot of other people get the full-blown disease of this year's version, it will NOT protect you from next year's flu much better than this years shot will protect you from next year's version. Shame on you for lying here. (BTW, I'll happily remove that "Shame on you" if you apologize for this portion of your post.)
    Last edited by rickst29; 01-04-2008 at 09:09 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    578

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Karen L. View Post
    It is a shame to see a student get the flu and miss a week of school when it could be prevented (most of the time, the flu shot is not a guarantee).
    Right. The shot won't guarantee that you will not get the flu- when they create the vaccine, they're guessing at the characteristics of the upcoming prevalent strains.

    But, even if you do get the flu, it's nearly 100% certain that the illness and it's symptoms will be less severe than you would experience if you hadn't taken the shot. Many of the antigens will be a close match, and will interfere with virus's ability to spread and reproduce within your body.

    And remember, everyone: These college students are fully grown, young, and strong. Pre-teen children and 50+ adults are a lot less capable of fighting flu, and usually have it a lot worse than the average college student.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •