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Thread: tears keep coming

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pooh's Mom View Post
    How do you handle those that think they know how it is with a child with the D.
    Say "Thank you" then let it all flow out the other ear unrecognized- Like you probably did with your parents growing up (I know I did). Me, I do what my wife says, and she tells me what the doctor says. I recognize they mean well, but unless my wife agrees, I don?t care. (At this, the only piece I actually took back to her was advice from an instructor who advised some dietary changes to reduce highs and prevent lows.)

  2. #12

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    What I tell people who want to see my blood sugar or give me advice is that if they want to manage my blood sugar- by all means, they are welcome to take over my care. Otherwise, I get to call the shots.
    -Jonah
    dx age 17, now 25
    on Lantus for 7 years; on minimed 530 G since 12/7/13

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by LantusFiend View Post
    Otherwise, I get to call the shots.
    Great pun!
    Mom to 2 boys (9 and 10), oldest dx in Oct. '06
    Pump MM522 w/ Sure-Ts infusion sets since July '10
    Cgms
    Previously pump Deltec Cozmo w/ Contact-Detach sets

    "He attacked everything in life with a mix of extraordinary genius and naive incompetence, and it was often difficult to tell which was which." ~ Douglas Adams

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    austin, tx
    Posts
    173

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    Hey Pooh's mom. People here know how you feel. My little girl will be 2 next month, and she was diagnosed just a few months ago. She cried with shots for the first few weeks, but now she wipes her own finger and pushes the button for finger sticks. I ask her where do you want your dose and she'll say belly or leg and lift her shirt with no tears. She amazes me and has made it so much easier for me to adapt to this new life of ours. Children are so resilient. Soon this will all get easier, but there is a grieving process involved and it is important that you give yourself permission to feel sad. While T1D isn't the end of the world it most definitely is life changing. Weeks go by when I don't think about it much other than calculating carbs and doses, and then there are weeks like this past one when her numbers are crazy and I cry to my husband that I don't want to be a pancreas anymore, I just want to be a mommy. My baby girl isn't stressed or sad, even though I sometimes am. She is still her usual happy self. The shots and pokes dont bug her anymore. I try to remember not to worry about what might be and just work with what is going on today. And today she is a smart, beautiful, healthy kid who just happens to also have diabetes.

    Also what helped me a lot was I made an info sheet about T1D and emailed it to family and friends. It really saved me having to answer the same annoying questions over and over like "will she grow out of it?" I can send it to you if you're interested. Many of them told me they really liked and appreciated it. I also included some fun facts about my daughter such as her obsession with shoes and great high five skills.
    Stephanie
    mom to Sage (3 1/2 yo) dx 12/11/11
    MDI with lantus and Novalog
    Dexcom G4 since Jan 2014

  5. #15

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    HUGS!!! Being pregnant and having young kids to care for is enough to make anyone's emotions rattled. Take one day at a time, and I am glad you found us. We have been there, I cried often the first few weeks, it is a grieving process.

    I sent a email out to my family and close friends explaining what it is and giving the basics.

    It helps with avoiding too many questions when your exhausted.
    Sheri
    Daughter dx~ age 12

    Amber ~age 17 Pumping w Ping
    Novolog

    Faith, Hope, and Love ~
    the greatest of these is Love.

  6. #16

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    Hi,
    It has been a while since your initial post, but I am new here. Your comment about people thinking they know everything struck a chord with me.
    My daughter (5) was only diagnosed a month ago. As you know, it is very hard to accept and the feelings you're dealing with are tremendous. My mother-in-law, who is a wonderful woman and means well, announced to me the other day as we were at the beach, watching my Gracie play in the water, "You know, Kim, you will see--she doesn't have Diabetes. They will find out pretty soon it is something else and she won't need that insulin. You will see." I wanted to shake her. My first thought was, "Well, I guess you won't be babysitting for her anytime soon!" It is enough to deal with our own denial at times, nevermind anyone else's!
    I know the tears are tough. Mine are still coming. I hope you are finding more peace and support as time goes on.

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