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Thread: teaching others how to do shots and care for son

  1. Default teaching others how to do shots and care for son

    Looking for great tips on how to teach/train our high school babysitters and grandparents on how to do the BG testing, giving shots and figuring how much to give
    the biggest thing is giving the shots

  2. #2

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    When my son was diagnosed at age 3 one of the first things that the CDE did was to have us give each other injections of saline. That helped me to be able to poke a needle into someone for the first time. After that I also poked a needle into my own arm and thigh to see how it felt and if it was better to do it quickly or slower. If these people are willing they could try that, taking an empty syringe or pen needle and just poking it into themselves to get an idea of how much pressure to apply and what it feels like. I would also tell them about any rituals you have as far as injections such as, if your son lays down or watches TV when you do the shot, what areas he prefers for the shots.

    For testing I would do the same, have them test their own blood sugar to see how it feels and let them know if their are any particular areas of the fingers that are more tender then others.

    As far as how much insulin to give. You would probably have to make up a chart with correction factors if your son has any and how much insulin he gets for how many carbs. And let them know that they can call you if they need further advice.
    Becky, Mom to Steven 12, dxd 7/04 MDI humolog and Lantus, Harry 14 non-d My 2 awesome boys

    Right now three things remain: Faith, hope and love But the greatest of these is love. 1 Corinthians 13:13


    "There is no rightness in diabetes. Just sometimes, you're less wrong." by Jacobs Dad

  3. #3

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    The inject-ease might make it easier for others and for you child. It takes the "stab" out of injections, and for us, that was huge.

    When my dd was younger I made up decks of index cards on a ring with simple bullet point instructions for how to treat lows, correcting hight and dosing for snacks, i.e., For lows "If bg is 50-60 give one juice box, observe, retest in 20 min, if not increased by 5pts, give one tab", etc etc the next card would cover bgs of 60-70 and so on.
    Sarah
    Mom to DD now 16, dx @4
    Cozmo pumper @6
    Minimed pumper @13
    G4 @ 15


    "Happy Birthday, Dr. Banting! Now... let's eat cake! Because, we CAN!" - MCS

  4. #4
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    Pens might make it easier for others. Easier to get the right amount with a pen than with a syringe, unless you're doing quarter units. Also, pens may be a bit less intimidating for others than a syringe.

    Put together some cheat sheets for them, including when and where to test and give shots, carb counts of stuff he likes to eat and an IC ratio or sliding scale of dosage, correction factor, and low procedure (what to give, when to retest, etc). You could make up a folder or small binder with this info and make sure they all have a copy of it and that you have extras at home.
    Heather
    mum to Campbell (16) dx July 2007, T:slim & Dexcom; & Thomas (12) non-D

  5. #5
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    Don't try to teach everything at once, start with the most important stuff (signs of lows, highs, how to do BG test).
    It's emotionally more difficult to give shots, but figuring out insulin/carb ratio correctly is more important and more difficult in a different way. So start with one, not both together.
    Include lots of time for the newby to watch you give shots, figure how much insulin aloud, etc. Talk them through a 'dry run' of giving shot using water and a piece of fruit (instead of a human). It's tricky to get small amounts of insulin into a small syringe when you first start.
    Kids may not want relative stranger (babysitter, teacher or even grandparent) to give shots, so you can plan around it so that they don't need shots until you get home (at first).

  6. Default

    We are using the pens as I thought it would be easier all the way around for everyone involved (us, school, grandparents and sitters) to get the dosage needed vs filling syringes out of a vial.
    Jarret wanted grandpa to give him his shot the other night and not my husband or myself. Grandpa told him no that he didn't know how to do it yet and Jarret pointed to a spot on his tummy and said it goes here. My family has a livestock background so I told my dad it was just like giving a calf a shot but he is not in a head gate to hold him still.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by momof2marchboys View Post
    Looking for great tips on how to teach/train our high school babysitters and grandparents on how to do the BG testing, giving shots and figuring how much to give
    the biggest thing is giving the shots
    Testing was relatively easy, Carbs not bad just a little explanation of carb count and servings.
    Shots were a different animal. We trained the day time sitter (adults) and grandparents with a syringe and an orange. Our back up sitters are both part time nurses.
    When training the other adults we would have them pull a specific amount of water into the syringe. We used a cup of water from the sink. We would check the dose and then they would inject an orange. After about 10 good ones we let them inject us with saline to get the feel of a real person. Then we ate at their house and let them inject insulin into our DD. It was the hardest on Grandma, she never did get used to it.
    Hope this helps.
    Kaylee 5, DXD 3/2009, Pumping MInimed, Novolog
    Juliann 2 Non D, Allergic to everything

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by momof2marchboys View Post
    We are using the pens as I thought it would be easier all the way around for everyone involved (us, school, grandparents and sitters) to get the dosage needed vs filling syringes out of a vial.
    Jarret wanted grandpa to give him his shot the other night and not my husband or myself. Grandpa told him no that he didn't know how to do it yet and Jarret pointed to a spot on his tummy and said it goes here. My family has a livestock background so I told my dad it was just like giving a calf a shot but he is not in a head gate to hold him still.
    Well, I think you have the biggest challenge accomplished. Many times the challenge isn't getting other loving adults who will willingly be trained, like a grandparent, often it's getting the kids to buy into allowing someone else to come at them with a needle. RUN with it - if your son is willing, show grandpa and the babysitter ASAP. Just break it down and keep it simple.
    Last edited by Mish; 02-01-2012 at 04:51 PM.
    son, age 13; dx 2005 @ age 5
    Pumps:Cozmo 2006; Revel 2010
    CGMS: MM 2010; Dexcom G4 2013

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mish View Post
    Well, I think you have the biggest challenge accomplished. Many times he challenge it's getting other loving adults who will willingly be trained, like a grandparent, often it's getting the kids to buy into allowing someone else to come at them with a needle. RUN with it - if your son is willing, show grandpa and the babysitter ASAP. Just break it down and keep it simple.
    Yes! This!
    Sarah
    Mom to DD now 16, dx @4
    Cozmo pumper @6
    Minimed pumper @13
    G4 @ 15


    "Happy Birthday, Dr. Banting! Now... let's eat cake! Because, we CAN!" - MCS

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Kentucky
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    152

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    When Hadlee was dx'd we had "classes" with my sisters-in-law. I wrote PAGES of notes (I know it was too much, but Hads was not even 2 yet!) I had them watch while I tested and gave insulin and then (at different times) watched as they tested her and gave her insulin. Testing bg's is easy, it's the carb counting that I think is hard to learn. We taught them how to measure stuff like ravioli and how many carbs are in a slice of bread. I was always available for them to call me if they ever had questions.

    We also do "refresher courses" as things are always changing, insulin needs change (we started on R and NPH which had to be mixed, then to Novolog and Lantus, then to Levemir, finally to pump.) Even though our babysitters don't babysit often, they care enough about Hadlee to make sure they stay up on what needs to be done.

    So my main advice is NOTES!! If you write it down, they can't "remember" it wrong
    Mom to:
    Aris (8-12-03) non-d
    Layne (5-4-05) non-d

    Hadlee (10-30-07) dx'd T1 6-09 Pumping w/ Animas Ping 4-12-11 Dexcom 9-15-11
    Wife to:
    Adam dx'd T1 1996

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