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Thread: Have You Glucagon Trained Your Non D kids?

  1. #1

    Default Have You Glucagon Trained Your Non D kids?

    Just thinking that if there comes a time in the future when I may have to leave my kids home alone while I work or something. I'm wondering if I should train my daughter to use the Glucagon or if even bringing it up would freak her out and make her feel afraid to be home alone with him. Have any of you trained your non D kids to use the Glucagon? Or are they just instructed to call 911 if you are not home?
    12 year old son T1 diagnosed @ age 10, July 16 2010
    MDI: Humalog & Lantus

    Home schooling my son for the first time this year.


    "I wanted a perfect ending. Now I've learned, the hard way, that some poems don't rhyme, and some stories don't have a clear beginning, middle, and end. Life is about not knowing, having to change, taking the moment and making the best of it, without knowing what's going to happen next. Delicious ambiguity". Gilda Radner, 1946-1989

  2. #2

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    Since my 10 year old D-child is my oldest, it'll be a while before they'll be staying home alone. I think a lot of it depends on the age and maturity of your daughter. That said, my 5 and 7 year olds know where juice and candy is kept and they need to bring it when I ask. They know how to test her blood sugar, and what insulin and her pump are for.
    LIBBY homeschooling mama to:
    Ella age 11 Dx T1 at 30 months (2/9/04). Hypothyroidism 4 years. Asthma 6 years. Evan's Syndrome 7 years. Celiac 10 years
    Pumping with purple minimed since 9/07
    Caleb age 8
    Nick, age 6 ADHD, SPD, PTSD and mood disorder NOS (probable bipolar disorder)
    Lydia, age 5 SPD
    Adam, age 3 Allergic to everything
    Linnea-Claire, age 22 months

  3. #3

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    I have not trained them with the glucagon. They are to call 911 and stick the tube of cake mate in his mouth and tell him to swallow and rub his cheek.

  4. #4

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    She is 14 but much more level headed and mature than the average 14 year old. However, she is still a child, and in a situation where he was that low and passed out, I cannot really say if handling glucagon would be way too much pressure for her. I am curious though what other parents do.
    12 year old son T1 diagnosed @ age 10, July 16 2010
    MDI: Humalog & Lantus

    Home schooling my son for the first time this year.


    "I wanted a perfect ending. Now I've learned, the hard way, that some poems don't rhyme, and some stories don't have a clear beginning, middle, and end. Life is about not knowing, having to change, taking the moment and making the best of it, without knowing what's going to happen next. Delicious ambiguity". Gilda Radner, 1946-1989

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Connor's Mom View Post
    I have not trained them with the glucagon. They are to call 911 and stick the tube of cake mate in his mouth and tell him to swallow and rub his cheek.
    I was wondering too if that might be the best thing for her to do. We have plenty of icing here.
    12 year old son T1 diagnosed @ age 10, July 16 2010
    MDI: Humalog & Lantus

    Home schooling my son for the first time this year.


    "I wanted a perfect ending. Now I've learned, the hard way, that some poems don't rhyme, and some stories don't have a clear beginning, middle, and end. Life is about not knowing, having to change, taking the moment and making the best of it, without knowing what's going to happen next. Delicious ambiguity". Gilda Radner, 1946-1989

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by momtojess View Post
    Yes, my boys have been trained ever since they were little. At first it was just trained on where it was, when to get it for an adult, etc. They are now 12 and 15 and learned a few years ago how to use it. We have a refresher course every year or so using an expired glucagon and orange.
    That's what I was considering doing with her. We have an expired glucagon and a grapefruit.
    12 year old son T1 diagnosed @ age 10, July 16 2010
    MDI: Humalog & Lantus

    Home schooling my son for the first time this year.


    "I wanted a perfect ending. Now I've learned, the hard way, that some poems don't rhyme, and some stories don't have a clear beginning, middle, and end. Life is about not knowing, having to change, taking the moment and making the best of it, without knowing what's going to happen next. Delicious ambiguity". Gilda Radner, 1946-1989

  7. #7

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    I'm responding as a D-sibling rather than as a mom. I don't remember being trained on the glucagon specifically, but I recognized it and remembered exactly where it had been kept when we trained on it for my daughter. I was extremely needle phobic, but I always knew it was there if I needed it for my sibling and that if I had to poke her, it wouldn't be a bad poke, it would be a much needed injection that she wouldn't be aware of until afterwards. For me, it was a reassurance, not a stressor. We knew the risks were there with every low. I would take the sibling's age and maturity into consideration, but the odds are great that they already are very conscious of the responsibility and dangers of D. I was watching my sibling when the post-hospital low occurred. By the time my parents arrived home, the BG reading was then high.

  8. #8

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    Yes, I have, along with two of her friends who were likely to be around a lot.
    Becky Aussi L'Autre
    Just takin' it all in.
    T
    -T1 Dx 5/2/06 at age 13
    (MDI) CGM - G4 5/13

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by MomofSweetOne View Post
    I'm responding as a D-sibling rather than as a mom. I don't remember being trained on the glucagon specifically, but I recognized it and remembered exactly where it had been kept when we trained on it for my daughter. I was extremely needle phobic, but I always knew it was there if I needed it for my sibling and that if I had to poke her, it wouldn't be a bad poke, it would be a much needed injection that she wouldn't be aware of until afterwards. For me, it was a reassurance, not a stressor. We knew the risks were there with every low. I would take the sibling's age and maturity into consideration, but the odds are great that they already are very conscious of the responsibility and dangers of D. I was watching my sibling when the post-hospital low occurred. By the time my parents arrived home, the BG reading was then high.
    Thank you for that. I VERY much appreciate your point of view on this.
    12 year old son T1 diagnosed @ age 10, July 16 2010
    MDI: Humalog & Lantus

    Home schooling my son for the first time this year.


    "I wanted a perfect ending. Now I've learned, the hard way, that some poems don't rhyme, and some stories don't have a clear beginning, middle, and end. Life is about not knowing, having to change, taking the moment and making the best of it, without knowing what's going to happen next. Delicious ambiguity". Gilda Radner, 1946-1989

  10. #10

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    Yes, my 16 yr old son and my 13 yr old both know how and when to administer glucagon.
    Robbie, mom to 5- 4 boys, 1 girl
    Josh (10)~DX T1 & hashimoto's 4/22/10~Omnipod11/23/10 Dexcom 8/11


    "Remember how strong you are, even if you don't realize it. How blessed you are, even if you can't see it. How deeply loved you are, even if you can't feel it. These things are always there-waiting, urging you to take them on. Be strong, be blessed, be love, give love, own your own love."

    "Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle."

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