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Thread: Veo with Low Glucose Suspend - our experience

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Hamilton, Canada
    Posts
    1,903

    Default Veo with Low Glucose Suspend - our experience

    I don't want to hijack either of the other threads but as users of the MM Veo with Low Glucose Suspend, I wanted to share last night's experience.

    DD had been low, 41, at 11pm when I was going to bed, treated with juice checked in 20 min. and she had gone up to 73, better but not comfortable for sleeping. Checked again 20 minutes later, 110 ~ ok time for sleep, set alarm for 3am. Slept through alarm.

    At 4:50am, I hear the faint beep of the alarm and go running into dd's room. The beeping was alerting because basal was being restarted after being suspended for 2 hours because the sensor reached it's low threshold(64) and shut off basal. Meter BG reading was currently 99.

    2 hours with no basal and dd was just at 99. I wonder how low she might have actually dropped.

    I gave her 2 tabs, and that combined with the residual effects of no basal for 2 hours had her waking up at 244. Far less than ideal but fixable.

    We've only been at this for 3 weeks and have experienced a few false lows, a sensor that seemed to be "stuck" low and of course, the growing pains of learning this new technology.

    But in my opinion as an imperfect, fallible substitute pancreas, it was all worth it last night.
    my extra sweet girls:
    Amanda age 11 dx'd Nov. 29 2008 (age 7) pumping with a Medtronic Veo & CGM

    Chloe age 11 dx'd Dec 7 2012 (age 11) MDI Lantus/Apidra

    My other great (non-d) kids:
    Colin age 16, Liam age 13



  2. #2

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    So glad you had the Veo last night. I tend to think that the basal suspend feature has the potential for more good than the harm that it could cause.
    EMMA - 21
    diagnosed T1 6th july 2007
    pumping with MM522 since july 2008
    MM523 since august 2012
    MM CGMS since november 2009

    cetirizine hydrochloride for solar urticaria dx'd in 2002
    levothyroxine for autoimmune hypothyroidism dx'd 13th may 2010
    venlafaxine, mirtazapine, lamotrigine and diazepam for bipolar disorder
    studying psychology at university

    twitter @emm142

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by emm142 View Post
    So glad you had the Veo last night. I tend to think that the basal suspend feature has the potential for more good than the harm that it could cause.
    Agree. I would love this system. Happy you had it last night also.ali

  4. #4

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    Thanks so much for sharing this.
    mom to Molly, 21, dx 7/9/10
    Pumping with Animas Ping 11/10
    Dave, 24, non D
    Wife to Bob...great guy!!

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mimi View Post
    But in my opinion as an imperfect, fallible substitute pancreas, it was all worth it last night.
    Glad it worked out as well as it did.

    Trust me, I would love to have a fallible substitute pancreas. Maybe I need to hop in the car and drive 4 hours to get one
    Diagnosed June '05
    Pumping since Feb '06
    Animas Ping
    Dexcom Study







    My current position:
    CIO...CHIEF INSULIN OFFICER

    "Life is under no obligation to give us what we expect"...Margaret Mitchell

    "Make it work"...Tim Gunn

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN
    Posts
    467

    Default

    Thank you so much for sharing this experience. It's very helpful in being able to judge the practicality of this type of system.
    Michael
    A 35-year-old Type 1, diagnosed at age 5 in 1984
    Diabetes Advocate, Writer and Managing Editor at DiabetesMine.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Philadelphia
    Posts
    4,288

    Default

    The Veo is sure to succeed in my opinion. I do the same thing hundreds of nights each year - cut off basal when the sensor shows low BG. About 1 time in 10 it will be the wrong decision if she sleeps on the sensor causing a false low, but I believe that every pump should have a sensor and a cutoff feature - it's really a no-brainer IMO.
    Dad to Leah and Anna, married to Pam
    Leah is 16, dx 1/1/2007 at age 8. Omnipod since 2007, Guardian CGM 2007-2013, Dexcom G4 2007-present. Sang the National Anthem at the 2013 JDRF Walk!

    CGMS Calibration - DCCT: The Study That Forever Changed Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes - Improved Glycemic Control in T1 children Using Real-Time CGMS

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darryl View Post
    The Veo is sure to succeed in my opinion. I do the same thing hundreds of nights each year - cut off basal when the sensor shows low BG. About 1 time in 10 it will be the wrong decision if she sleeps on the sensor causing a false low, but I believe that every pump should have a sensor and a cutoff feature - it's really a no-brainer IMO.
    And I don't think it would be hard at at all to integrate into a pumP either, it's the red tape getting it approved that's the hard part.
    Diagnosed June '05
    Pumping since Feb '06
    Animas Ping
    Dexcom Study







    My current position:
    CIO...CHIEF INSULIN OFFICER

    "Life is under no obligation to give us what we expect"...Margaret Mitchell

    "Make it work"...Tim Gunn

  9. #9

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    :0) How about that!!!! Go JDRF!!!! Bring the VEO & AP to the USA!!! USA!!! USA!!!
    17 yr old Zakk
    I am Donna , Zakk's Mom
    Diagnosed Oct 09
    MM Revel, Former CGMS user of MM and Dexcom

    Until there is a cure there is Awesome Annie- Diabetic Service Dog (DAD)

  10. #10

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    Thank you for your input.

    Yes, my alarm is set for overnight checks, but having a pump as a back up for safety would be a peace of mind.

    I am so glad you had the Veo last night.

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