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Thread: Do pumps hurt?

  1. Default Do pumps hurt?

    I don't know much about pumps, but have been reading about them if the day comes that we go that route. What I'm wondering is, do they hurt to use? I don't know all the proper terminology. What I'm getting at is does it hurt to put the delivery system in place? I've watched videos of insertions, and I gather that they are quick, but not much beyond that.
    Tami
    Mom to 4 boys including
    the wondrous Hudson!
    13 yrs, dx 12/10/10 & 4/5/11 (long story!)
    4/11 -- Humalog (as needed)
    6/11 -- Humalog started becoming a daily/most every meal thing
    6/11 -- Started Lantus
    11/12 -- Started pumping! Paradigm Revel
    a1c: 7.2 at dx; 6.2 6/11; 6.8 10/11; 7.6 2/12; 8.8 6/12 ugh; 8 10/12 yay!; 7.2 2/13


    Positively Type 1 on FaceBook!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    792

    Default

    Our only experience is with OmniPod. For the most part, Hana says it doesn't hurt at all or if it does, it is kind of like getting snapped quickly with a rubber band. But it seems like she only gets that occasionally in certain spots and not with others (maybe the more fat on the spot we are using, the better?). However, it is over immediately- a quick snap and it's done. We change the POD every 3 days. That is compared to the 8+ injections she was getting daily before the pump - so I"m sure it is worth it.
    But if you ask her, she will say that no, pumping doesn't hurt.
    Like I said, we've only used the POD. From what I understand, there is more involved to inserting a sight for a tubed pump, so others may have a different experience.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Posts
    700

    Default

    I cannot talk from experience but I CAN tell you that my son can barely feel the cannula being inserted when he changes his infusion site.

    So, does not hurt? No it does not.

    And if you decide to start using an insulin pump, you'll love it and will not look back, no matter what type you use.
    ------------------------------------------------
    14 year old son Jeremy Dx Type 1 Dec 15th 2009.
    A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.
    Omnipod - November 1st 2010
    Dexcom - April 18th 2011
    ------------------------------------------------

  4. #4

    Default

    They have a cream called elm cream that numbs the area..With that sometimes my son says it hurts sometimes not..he said it feels like a bee sting..It is never enough to slow him down..He will get his site changed and run out the door. I have done it to myself with the cream and it is not that bad..best of luck to you
    part of our step out team~team Just For Love~

    Katrina
    wife to a wonderful husband.
    Mom to 3 amazing beautiful boys
    Blake 8 yrs (T1 DX 2-12-08) pumping with a blue animas ping for 2 yrs) Just started the dexcom 7- July-15-11..
    Curtis 7 yrs
    Kaleb 2 yrs

  5. #5

    Default

    Lucas just recently got his first pump and he tells me all the time that it's much better than being stuck several times a day. When Wyatt first received his, our endo required his Dad and I to wear it for three days each with saline in it, the insertion process was easy and not painful at all. I'd rather have it than my fingers pricked. The boys never complain about it being painful.
    Mom of 4
    Wyatt dx Nov 05
    Lucas dx Nov 09
    Cole
    Kaitlyn

  6. Default

    Thanks for the answers I am especially intrigued by the Pod, so really like hearing about that.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,899

    Default

    If they hurt for longer than a minute or so, I usually take that as an indicator that it's a bad site, and 95% of the time, it is. It usually isn't very painful, and when it IS, it's usually only for a minute-ish.
    20 years old
    T1D 2/7/07
    Hypothyroid 4/24/09
    MM 7/07
    Dexcom 3/12

  8. #8

    Default

    IMO pump insertions don't hurt much more than an injection. I prefer doing insertions manually, as opposed to the spring-loaded devices, and just slip the needle in like an injection (then remove the needle and leave the cannula in). You can always get a numbing creme like Emla if pain is a concern. I took a photo to show you a comparison between pump site needles and a syringe.



    On the left is the MiniMed Quickset infusion set (you remove the needle and leave a cannula in place) The needle looks thicker than it is, the light hit it badly
    In the middle is a normal insulin syringe, obviously
    On the right is the Rapid-D needle set. The needle stays in place (its good for people who have problems with cannulas kinking). As you can see, its tiny.

    Not so scary eh? 1 site change/3 days really beats 6 or so injections a day
    23 y/o, Dx 12/02 Type 1
    Pumping purple MM Veo
    BSN, RN

  9. #9

    Default

    The infusion set (which has either a plastic or metal "needle") may hurt but you can always use a numbing cream to help out with that. Some kids have a higher threshold pain, others a lower (my son falls on the latter scale).

    There are different lenghts for the "needle" and also for the tubing, which is connected to the actual pump).

    There are also different infusion sets for the different pumps.

    Taking out an old "site" is again dependent on how a kid reacts. Mine hates it, but sometimes he doesn't feel it at all.

    On average you leave an infusion set in for 3 days. Some people do better on less, some on more.

    The pump (the tubed ones anyway) can be clipped onto the pants or worn on something like a pump pouch or just stuck in the pockets (though we've found sometimes the tubing at the top of the reservoir breaks when my son has worn his in the pocket). It's a question of habit and preference.

    Giving insulin through a pump does not hurt usually, but sometimes, if the insulin is too cold, it may be felt going through.
    Mom to 2 boys (8 & 10), oldest dx in Oct. '06
    Pump MM522 w/ Sure-Ts infusion sets since July '10
    Previously pump Deltec Cozmo w/ Contact-Detach sets

    "He attacked everything in life with a mix of extraordinary genius and naive incompetence, and it was often difficult to tell which was which." ~ Douglas Adams

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Posts
    700

    Default

    I think the "hurt" is more psychological then physical. Doing a site change using the Omnipod does not hurt (according to my son), the Dexcom 7+ CGMS has an insertion device that looks a lot worse then it actually is. Jeremy had to pluck up the courage to do a sensor insertion last night. I eventually did it for him. He knows there is a long needle in the device but in actual fact, only a small part penetrates the skin and the actual discomfort is very minimal. Also, the insertion is over before you know it.

    Once you get past the "perception" that it may hurt, you realize that it probably doesn't or if it does, it is very minimal.

    If you are interested in the Omnipod as your choice of insulin pumps, you will find a ton of info, both positive and negative on this site, (mostly positive). Feel free to ask us questions.
    ------------------------------------------------
    14 year old son Jeremy Dx Type 1 Dec 15th 2009.
    A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.
    Omnipod - November 1st 2010
    Dexcom - April 18th 2011
    ------------------------------------------------

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