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Thread: Air bubbles in tubing ............

  1. Angry Heat & Bubbles in Tubing causing highs

    Hi - I'm new to the forum & my son is 7 & has been on the pump since last May. We have been having air bubble probs too & thought I had it solved with educator said to leave insulin out all the time as it would be used up before going off, I'm also very careful when changing tubing. Now we have had a few hot days & this week he has had 3 nights where he has reached over 20mmols & picked him up at lunchtime today as he was 26! unheard of with the needles, but love the freedom of the pump) I suspect that varying air temps is causing the prob (educator agreed it might be too) - this is our first summer, maybe combined with his body reacting to the heat (his sugars also increased in hot days last summer). I would be interested to hear from longer term users of the pump in warmer climates to see if they experienced this problem & if there are any pouch pockets available that act as a cooler to stop the insulin warming up in the first place as his insulin in the resevoir lasts up to a week? Or am I barking up the wrong tree altogether (pumping isn't a science as much as educated guesswork I've found!)
    Thanks!

  2. #12

    Default

    You can get a Frio pump wallet to hold the pump in. http://www.insulincase.com/detail.aspx?ID=5
    23 y/o, Dx 12/02 Type 1
    Pumping purple MM Veo
    BSN, RN

  3. #13

    Default

    Hi,

    The Frio pump wallet works superbly in hot conditions. Our staff uses them heavily in Summer conditions. I have found insulin goes bad quicker when it is hot and sites go bad sooner. Demands care and attention!

  4. #14

    Default getting rid of bubbles........

    check out this bubble buster list:

    http://canada.insulin-pumpers.org/bubblebusters.html

    I just copied part of the info from this site. Click on the link to find more help.
    I also find that if I prefill the resevoir, let it sit upright for a few hrs, push out bubbles, then whack the resevoir with a butter knofe to get all the bubbles to go to the top- then push them back into the vial......
    #8 helps a lot too...
    Stacey


    1. Leave your insulin out until it reaches room temperature. (We use a mixture of insulins so we have to leave them both out until they warm up a bit)

    2. Tighten all the spots where there is an attachment. That will help prevent bubbles from getting in.
    3. After your syringe has been filled, allow it to sit for awhile so bubbles
    will rise to the top. Then you can push the darn things out.
    4. Wear the pump upside down, then the bubbles rise away from the tubing. Love this one, wish Erica wore a belt!
    5. Create a large bubble in the syringe by taking in some air then use that to 'suck' up all of the little bubbles. It is then easy to remove the large bubble (and all of the small ones along with it).
    6. Make sure you get most of the air out of the neck of the syringe before flicking it, which breaks up the bubbles and spreads them around.
    7. Don't shake your insulin vial.
    8. When filling a cartridge/syringe, I have available a small syringe with the plunger removed. After I have the insulin started into the cartridge, I insert the syringe into the vial stopper as it is upside-down. This allows air back into the vial and helps to equalize the pressure. I direct the tip of the syringe away from the tip of the cartridge needle so as to not introduce air ack into the cartridge. Of course you end up with a LOT of bubbles in the vial, but wouldn't you rather have them there than in your cartridge? ;>)
    9. Using a cartridge for filling the syringe, rather than a vial, helps keep those bubbles away. 10. If you are using a pen cartridge to draw insulin from, I find that actually PUSHING the insulin into the reservoir by depressing the cartridge plunger helps to alleviate the bubbles.

    Stacey
    mom to Allison-27-
    Daniel 25
    Jesse- 21 - dx'd 12/01, pumping since 4/03
    Pumping with a TSLIM and loving it !
    Dexcoming with a G4 and LOVING it !!

  5. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TomsMum View Post
    Hi - I'm new to the forum & my son is 7 & has been on the pump since last May. We have been having air bubble probs too & thought I had it solved with educator said to leave insulin out all the time as it would be used up before going off, I'm also very careful when changing tubing. Now we have had a few hot days & this week he has had 3 nights where he has reached over 20mmols & picked him up at lunchtime today as he was 26! unheard of with the needles, but love the freedom of the pump) I suspect that varying air temps is causing the prob (educator agreed it might be too) - this is our first summer, maybe combined with his body reacting to the heat (his sugars also increased in hot days last summer). I would be interested to hear from longer term users of the pump in warmer climates to see if they experienced this problem & if there are any pouch pockets available that act as a cooler to stop the insulin warming up in the first place as his insulin in the resevoir lasts up to a week? Or am I barking up the wrong tree altogether (pumping isn't a science as much as educated guesswork I've found!)
    Thanks!
    Depending on where the bubble is and what's going on decides how I handle it. This is for the MM pump...
    If the bubble is pretty far from the infusion set, I will wait a while (constantly checking it) because frankly it's a pain priming .3 every time and it's several feet away from the end. I wait till it's closer and then use the .3 priming to get it out.
    If the bubbles are far away, and I need to get them out now without waiting. I take the reservoir out, rewind, put the same reservoir back in, and prime it till the bubbles are out.

    Room temperature insulin is KEY! If the insulin is cold, air and bubbles will happen!
    My other two suggestions are...
    When filling the reservoir for the first time with insulin pull the plunger back all the way to end with air, then attach the reservoir to the vial of insulin, push all that air (which causes pressure in the vial) into the vial before flipping it over. Another words the vial is sitting on the counter and the reservoir is on top when you push all the air into the vial. Flip the vial and reservoir over (while your holding it on the vial- not sitting it on the counter) and let the pressure in the vial cause the reservoir to fill up with insulin. When it appears to be done moving on it's own if you need more insulin pull the plunger back and finish it a line farther than what you need. You should have one larger bubble in there somewhere. Tap it with a pen until it rises to the top. Don't tap the heck out of, it will cause a lot of surface air bubbles, and those are the worst. Using the plunger SLOWLY push up on the plunger until you don't see anymore air bubbles going into the vial of insulin.
    My other suggestion is filling the reservoir the night before and let it sit on the counter over night. Maybe that way if your developing any bubbles from the insulin not being room temperature the bubbles will have a chance to form on that day it's getting to room temperature.
    Lastly, I believe bubbles do happen magically. Jumping around and such doesn't help either. Kids are going to skip and jump so constantly be checking the tubing, is really your biggest defense.
    Good luck, and I hope this helps in some way!!!
    Lanae
    Proud Mom of
    Tyler (19)
    Abby (10) dxd 1/07 Type 1
    Pumping w/MM522 05/02/07
    Novolog/Sure T sites
    CGMS- 8/11/08
    Hashimotos Disease 6/08

    "Endless"

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