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Thread: lunch/recess monitors

  1. #1

    Default lunch/recess monitors

    there has been some great advice on school here recently, thank you. I may have missed this topic so I apologize if this is a repeat question but here it goes. What do you all do about lunch/recess monitors? There are no teachers there only these monitors. Do you send a meter and glucose tabs outside with instructions? Do you just have them call the nurse if there is a problem? I guess lunch is not really an issue because the nurse is right down the hall but I am concerned about recess and arrival. My DD is only 6. She knows how to check BS but not what to do?
    Also, I see people leave "low" kits in several places but do you also leave extra glucose monitors? Any advice would be appreciated. thanks Colleen

  2. #2

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    We do not leave anything with the lunch or playground monitors, but Jack's school is really small, and the nurse's office is only steps away from the lunchroom and playground. Her office actually has a door that opens onto the playground. Part of the reason too is that Jack is asymptomatic, so if he's low enough to need assistance, he's probably going to need glucagon anyway, which I feel is beyond the scope of lunch and playground aides in a school with a full-time nurse.
    Mom to J., age 10
    Dx 2007 @ age 3
    Medtronic pump and CGM (4/2008-6/2013)
    Tandem t:slim and Dexcom G4 CGM (current)

  3. #3
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    Aug 2006
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    We have the nurse check Brian's BG before recess (and he usually gets 10 free carbs before heading out to play). He carries some tabs or skittles with him in case he feels low, and will treat himself without testing, but that's it. The monitors are all aware of his D, and I believe they carry tabs on them, but he has never needed their help.

    The recess monitors will take note of when he goes inside to use the bathroom and will make sure he comes out. When he was younger, someone would go inside the school with him so he wasn't alone.

    Andrew's school is much smaller and his classroom door opens directly on the playground and is monitored by his teacher who is his primary care giver at school.

    Mary Lou

    Mother of Brian, Age 14, dx'd Jan 18, 2004, pumping 4 years, CGM June 2007
    Mother of Andrew, Age 11, dx'd June 14, 2007, pumping the very next day, June 15, 2007, CGM June 2008


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  4. #4

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    This post really caught my eye because I am the recess monitor at my dd school.

    Our school at the beginning of the year gives us a confidential medical list. It has everyone on there that has a medical issue of any sort, allergies and so forth. Of course there are 2 children that have T1. So they are both on there. The list includes there name and what class they are in so we know when thrid grade comes out little "johnny" is coming and he is allergic to bee stings.

    We also carry walkie talkies to radio to the principal/nurse if there is a problem. We have never in 6 years needed to call in an emergency.

    I hope this helps ease your fears. You might want to call the school and see what their protocol is.
    Judy





    Daughter Alli-13, Dx'd Type 1 June 12, 2006 at 8 years old. Dx'd Celiac August 13, 2008 at 10 years old
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  5. #5

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    Last year the nurse met with the whole school and explained how to treat a low with gel. Then gel was placed in strategic locations around the elementary school.

    This year, no training at the middle school beyond the nurse. However, she is having a Children's Healthcare of Atlanta nurse come to do in service training. I prepared several emergency kits (pencil boxes) with meter, juice, tabs, gel and peanut butter crackers and they are scatteed throughout the building in homeroom, chorus, gym, media center in case of sudden low or lockdown situation.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by coconne3 View Post
    there has been some great advice on school here recently, thank you. I may have missed this topic so I apologize if this is a repeat question but here it goes. What do you all do about lunch/recess monitors? There are no teachers there only these monitors. Do you send a meter and glucose tabs outside with instructions? Do you just have them call the nurse if there is a problem? I guess lunch is not really an issue because the nurse is right down the hall but I am concerned about recess and arrival. My DD is only 6. She knows how to check BS but not what to do?
    Also, I see people leave "low" kits in several places but do you also leave extra glucose monitors? Any advice would be appreciated. thanks Colleen
    Is recess before or after lunch? If before, she should test before going out and have a snack if necc. If after, It's unlikely she will go low while on the playground. But, I would still make a point of meeting them and introducing them to your daughter face to face. That way if she comes to them feeling low, they will know what she's talking about and get her to the nurse.


    Seth 17, dx'd at 7 (shots for most of 9+ years, has been on the Omnipod/Apidra for 1 year)

    Always always always....Trust your gut!:

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Merryland
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    Whether a child should be tested before recess depends on when recess is in relation to snack or lunch, etc. In K we tested and last year we did not cause recess was right after lunch.

    William has a box that goes with him everywhere that is one of those little storage boxes with a handle - got it at Target. Inside is a test kit ready to go, tabs, juice, cheese/cracker snack and a copy of his health plan written such that a layperson could make it out. The monitors are made aware of his medical issues and have walkie talkies. Our school is small so if there is a problem he is escorted to the health room by an adult. The supply box is in case there is an emergency lock down of the school. Those kids outside the school might be take across the street to the high school or next door to another facility that was an old middle school. This is so he would have supplies with him. The box is also taken with him inside the school so if there is a lock down his supplies are always with him.

    He is 7 and can test and is learning to treat himself (with tabs if low) - but he still needs supervision for the most part. When he is older we expect he would test and treat anywhere - but this is what we do for now.
    Carol G.
    mom to William, age 11, dx'd 3/04 and started pumping 10/04 - Animas 1200. Animas Ping started 01/09; cgms Navigator start 4/6/09; RIP Navigator 9-1-11, Dexcom 7+start 10/11, G4 start 11/12.
    and mom to Rod (15) not D

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Michigan
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    1,625

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    My son hands his "to go" pack off to a recess montior. It has all of his supplies in it...always near by.
    Shannon, mom to:

    Ben, Non-d 14 yrs old.

    Sam, dx@15mo. Now 12 yrs old, currently pumping with t-slim .


    Jamie, 3 years old.

  9. #9

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    Jake's school is 400 kids, but they aren't all on the playground at the same time. One of the monitors is also the person who makes sure he finishes his lunch (after recess), so I know that at least one is aware. Judy's post made me feel better!

    No kit, they would get him to the health aide.
    Denise, Mama to:
    Jacob, 10 yrs, 4th grade - diagnosed type 1 on 12/15/08
    novolog & levemir MDI still honeymooning?

    Evelyn, 8 yrs, 2nd grade, antibodies negative

    Arrange whatever pieces come your way.
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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by sammysmom View Post
    My son hands his "to go" pack off to a recess montior. It has all of his supplies in it...always near by.
    Similar here. But Lia has an aide that counts her carbs at lunch and she carries all her supplies with her in a mini back pack (we also have back ups of everything in the office). Outside Lia usually hands it to the aide. Sometimes though she will forget it and just goes about her playing with it on her back lol.

    We are also a small school and when she was younger she didn't carry her supplies with her. They also have walkie talkies.
    Laurie

    Mom to Lia Grace, 13 yrs, dx 1/13/06 at age 5.
    Started with NPH and Regular, switched to Lantus and Novolog after three months and then started pumping after 1.5 years.
    CURRENTLY Pumping with the Animas Ping and using the Dexcom G4.

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