PDA

View Full Version : 5th Grade Science Project - Diabetes



DadCares
09-16-2011, 09:37 PM
Anyone have a suggestion for a 5th grade science project on type 1 diabetes?

Nancy in VA
09-16-2011, 09:39 PM
If I had my druthers, I'd love to see a comparison of A1C tests when blood sugars are at different levels. Its probably an expensive proposal with home testing, but I wanted to get my daughter to do it for high school science fair and they woudln't let them do anything with the human body.

During the same day, or couple of days - do a BG test and when in range, do an A1C test. Within the same day, find a time when the subject is high and do an A1C test.

Wait 2 weeks and repeat both scenarios

Wait 2 weeks and repeat both scenarios.

I'm convinced our A1Cs aren't lower because we are always at the clinic right after breakfast. Our meter average this past trip was below 140 but our A1C went UP to 7.5 (which correlates to 168). I'm convinced (but can't prove) that her BG at the time of A1C HAS to affect the reading.

Lisa P.
09-16-2011, 09:51 PM
You know what I think would be interesting? A comparison of the different methods of taking care of diabetes over the years. Like, glucose strips vs. meter strips vs. CGMS; long acting insulins vs. short acting insulins; re-usable syringes vs. disposable vs. pumps. But I guess that's not really so science project -ish.

sdneese
09-16-2011, 09:52 PM
My son did one last year using two different meters to test his blood sugar. He just used both every time he tested for a month, entered the numbers in an excel sheet, and calculated the variance. He called it "Accuracy Matters?" We found out his old meter (we had switched to Omnipod at that point) was HUGELY different. He talked about what the numbers meant and why it was so bad to have an unreliable meter (when one said 90 and the other said 52). He ended up winning the county fair with it.

MomofSweetOne
09-16-2011, 09:52 PM
I suggested to my DD that she eat 30g of something for a meal and then print-out the graph on her CGM to show that all carbs don't affect the BGs the same. I also suggested she put photos of how large the 30g portion really is...green beans vs. potato chips, etc.

Lisa P.
09-16-2011, 09:56 PM
My son did one last year using two different meters to test his blood sugar. He just used both every time he tested for a month, entered the numbers in an excel sheet, and calculated the variance. He called it "Accuracy Matters?" We found out his old meter (we had switched to Omnipod at that point) was HUGELY different. He talked about what the numbers meant and why it was so bad to have an unreliable meter (when one said 90 and the other said 52). He ended up winning the county fair with it.

That's very cool.

sdneese
09-16-2011, 10:02 PM
That's very cool.

Thanks! He was very proud of it! And so was I...:D

kjmaf
09-16-2011, 10:44 PM
My non-d daughter (4th grade at the time) last year tested to see not cleaning and drying your fingers would affect bg reading. It was a lot of extra paperwork to use blood, so she would drop the control solution on an area that contained (seperately) dirt, flour, sugar, juice, diet soda, soap, etc. to see if the control solution measured out of its range. She placed 4th at the regional science fair.

swimmom
09-16-2011, 10:57 PM
In 5th grade my daughter used her non-D brother to help - he tested then ate a food (such as a donut) then tested again at 5 min., 15 min. 30 min and 1 hour. I think they also used a piece of chicken and a soda. Then she made a graph with the data points and wrote the paper about how insulin works in a functioning pancreas and how her pump simulates it after she inputs the carbs. She got a blue ribbon. Her brother was really nice to test so much for it!

It was interesting to see that after a donut his BG went up to 300, then was back at 90 within a very short time (I think at the 30 min mark).

sarahspins
09-16-2011, 11:09 PM
I would do it on how surface contamination (like juice, or other food residue on your fingers) can effect BG results when hands aren't washed, or not washed very well.. the differences with some things can be astonishing.

Lee
09-17-2011, 12:27 AM
My son did one last year using two different meters to test his blood sugar. He just used both every time he tested for a month, entered the numbers in an excel sheet, and calculated the variance. He called it "Accuracy Matters?" We found out his old meter (we had switched to Omnipod at that point) was HUGELY different. He talked about what the numbers meant and why it was so bad to have an unreliable meter (when one said 90 and the other said 52). He ended up winning the county fair with it.

This is extremely cool and I would love to see the results!

NomadIvy
09-17-2011, 04:18 AM
Sorry...didn't have time to go through all the responses.
My 6th grader presented a project about the pancreas and what happens to it when you have Type 1 diabetes. She had a clay model of a pancreas. Then she proceeded to conduct an experiment on her and her Type 1 sister. They would check their blood sugar at the same time, eat the same amount of carbs, then check 20 minutes later to see what their BG was. Of course this meant her sister with Type 1 wouldn't bolus until after they've checked on the 20th minute mark. They probably just did 5 different "experiments". I remember one was a box of apple juice, then there was a 6g chocolate, I don't remember what else. Older sis then explained what happens when we eat re: insulin, energy, etc. and what the difference is with a "normal" body and the body of a type 1. HTH.

suz
09-17-2011, 07:01 AM
My son did one last year to test how food affects blood sugar in diffent people. He had 3 subjets: Type 1, Type 2 and non-D. Tested BG at start for all 3, then they all ate the same item and then re-tested at 15 and 30 minutes. The Type 1 didn't bolus for carbs until the end of the test.
He did this 3 times with 3 different types of food (candy, cookie and a cracker). The T2 was on daily tablets.

We created charts for each test showing the % increase and a line chart. You could clearly see how a non-D's numbers stayed steady, a T2 climbed slowly and, in the words of my kiddo, the T1 "went through the roof"!

He won 1st prize for his grade and then got a special award at district finals. He was in 1st grade, but had a lot of help from me. I'm sure your 5th grader could manage something like this by themselves.

DadCares
09-17-2011, 01:35 PM
You all are awesome! Everyone of you has good ideas. We are going to look for some combination of several of your ideas. If I choose a non-diabetic for some tests, I'm pretty sure our 7 year-old daughter will not volunteer, so I'll choose myself. We have a CGM so we have plenty of times where we can compare the results to actual finger pricks.

We welcome more ideas as well!

2type1s
09-18-2011, 03:01 PM
My daughter did a project with herself and 3 friends, similar to another PP, where they ate food (a cookie, apple, and a piece of cheese). They tested at 5, 15, 30, one hour. We did not give Morgan insulin until after the 1 hour mark, and all kids were fasting for at least 3 hours prior to eating. the graphs we're quite dramatic! I remember doing lots of math and having my husband help make graphs on the computer. Pancreas made insulin is so efficient!