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Nancy in VA
02-02-2011, 07:51 PM
There is a raging debate in the JDRF thread about people's definition of a cure. A question was kinda batted around but never really delved into.

I DO NOT WANT TO REHASH THE JDRF DISCUSSION HERE - GO TO THAT THREAD IF YOU WANT TO DO THAT.

My question is this - is there a chronic disease that has been "cured". A truely chronic disease that has been cured - meaning people that HAD it were given a treatment and it was gone. In many cases, diseases have been erradicated by vaccinating the young and then those afflicted have died - thus resulting in no people with the disease. But, I'm just having trouble thinking of a chronic disease that has been cured so that someone who had to live with it suddenly didn't have to.

Can someone help me identify some?

frizzyrazzy
02-02-2011, 08:04 PM
you could talk about chronic illnesses that are "cured" by antibiotic administration - things like tuberculosis, or organ transplant cures those with chronic lung or heart conditions.

But I know that's not what you're getting at. Antibiotics cure a lot of things, and that's closer to where you're going. Organ transplants, while curing those diseases, bring a host of new issues. But they are cures.

You could look at a disease like HIV and say while it's not cured, it is no longer the deadly disease that it once was due to available medicines and I guess the same could be said for Diabetes.

(I was just googling - found one - Scurvy . LOL)

Nancy in VA
02-02-2011, 08:08 PM
Well, pancreatic transplants are available today, so technically you could say there is a cure to T1 available now.

I guess what I'm trying to identify is chronic diseases that someone has developed a cure for that has been able to restore an individual with that disease back to pre-disease condition

frizzyrazzy
02-02-2011, 08:14 PM
so like tuberculosis - can be cured with a long course of antibiotics and scurvy can be cured with Vitamin C. Those things are still in existence in society and can be cured.

I'm not sure there are many other diseases LIKE diabetes though and the ones I can think of, are all autoimmune types like where the person has the disease and lives a relatively normal life with the disease yet still has it.

Flutterby
02-02-2011, 08:14 PM
Well, pancreatic transplants are available today, so technically you could say there is a cure to T1 available now.

I guess what I'm trying to identify is chronic diseases that someone has developed a cure for that has been able to restore an individual with that disease back to pre-disease condition

Yes, it would be cured for a while. But then the autoimmune issue will come back into play and eventually they'd be dealing with type 1 again.

I don't know of any

(what the heck is scurvy?? doesn't sound pleasant.).

Lisa P.
02-02-2011, 08:16 PM
I think the bigger and more controversial question is how you have dared to change your picture after all this time. Really confused me.

As for chronic diseases that have been cured, I think to date you're right, we're talking about diseases that have living pathogens. For example, there are some parasites that populations in the past have pretty much lived with from childhood until death that are now cured when the parasite is killed. I believe, for example, that Carter spearheaded a campaign to get rid of a kind of worm that infected feet when people walked in infected water. It's cured in individuals through treatment and also largely gone in the societies it had threatened.

So far, people can prevent viral infection using the body's own immune system, but not kill a virus. Cancer can be beaten down and cured in some, if you count "cured" as gone and not recurring until death by another cause, but it's not something that can be cured in every instance, of course.

Autoimmune diseases could, in my opinion, be considered "malfunctions" rather than diseases in the traditional sense. In that way, we're talking about misfires of the body, so I'd consider curing them to be a whole different category. So if you can find a cure for one, I would not doubt you'd have hope for a cure for many. This, to me, is the biggest argument for the population to fund research for curing Type 1 -- where it looks promising, if we can follow through and if it actually works out, the implications for other diseases seem to be pretty huge.

Lisa P.
02-02-2011, 08:19 PM
Here it is, it's the guinea worm.

So, we can "cure" people of chronic parasitic infections, of chronic bacterial infections, and of some cancers at some points, which would be an entirely different kind of disease.

Viruses we can't cure, but we can help the body cure itself of them.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/26/international/africa/26worm.html

Sarah Maddie's Mom
02-02-2011, 08:24 PM
I guess what I'm trying to identify is chronic diseases that someone has developed a cure for that has been able to restore an individual with that disease back to pre-disease condition

Nancy, I know that you work hard for JDRF, so I assume you participate in the plethora of "Cure" events sponsored by JDRF. Given that, have you been working toward a hopeless cause? Or do you believe that Type 1 will be the unique chronic disease that JDRF will triumph over and restore our kids to a pre-disease condition?

Nancy in VA
02-02-2011, 08:25 PM
But Lisa, are cancer patients considered "cured" or "in remission". I hear both so I don't know which is valid.

I guess maybe that there are different "types" of diseases that we are talking about. We've named several chronic diseases: Lupus, T1, MS - but those all seem to be auto-immune.

Is TB cured? Is TB a disease or an "illness". I guess I thought of TB as an illness? Is that the big thing - do we need to define what a disease vs an illness is - are they different or are they the same?

And Lisa, I realized that my picture was quite old, and I'm about 20lbs lighter than that picture, so I wanted a bit more modern one.

Nancy in VA
02-02-2011, 08:27 PM
Nancy, I know that you work hard for JDRF, so I assume you participate in the plethora of "Cure" events sponsored by JDRF. Given that, have you been working toward a hopeless cause? Or do you believe that Type 1 will be the unique chronic disease that JDRF will triumph over and restore our kids to a pre-disease condition?

I'm still involved with JDRF -I answered this question in the other thread.

Flutterby
02-02-2011, 08:28 PM
But Lisa, are cancer patients considered "cured" or "in remission". I hear both so I don't know which is valid.

I guess maybe that there are different "types" of diseases that we are talking about. We've named several chronic diseases: Lupus, T1, MS - but those all seem to be auto-immune.

Is TB cured? Is TB a disease or an "illness". I guess I thought of TB as an illness? Is that the big thing - do we need to define what a disease vs an illness is - are they different or are they the same?

And Lisa, I realized that my picture was quite old, and I'm about 20lbs lighter than that picture, so I wanted a bit more modern one.

I believe they go into remission and then after so many years of remission, then they can be considered cured.

Lisa P.
02-02-2011, 08:34 PM
But Lisa, are cancer patients considered "cured" or "in remission". I hear both so I don't know which is valid.

I guess maybe that there are different "types" of diseases that we are talking about. We've named several chronic diseases: Lupus, T1, MS - but those all seem to be auto-immune.

Is TB cured? Is TB a disease or an "illness". I guess I thought of TB as an illness? Is that the big thing - do we need to define what a disease vs an illness is - are they different or are they the same?

If your point for the question is to pose the idea that cure/not cure is not as simple as all that, I totally agree with that. I do think that when you use "cure" for fundraising you need to appraise what most people think of the term when they work to raise funds for a cure. I think it's fair to say that ongoing transplantation efforts with a short-term goal of improving the condition and a long-term goal of ending the condition would be something most folks would consider a "cure". Artificial pancreas? I wouldn't, but I can fairly see how some might. Kidney disease drugs, I don't think so. So, I do think that it's fair to market differently. But I do agree that not everyone thinks of "cure" in the same way, I think that's absolutely fair.

I do hear remission instead of cure. I think the idea would be that with cancer, as with autoimmune, you don't have an outside agent attacking the body. The body is attacking itself. So the underlying propensity MAY still remain, and since we don't know what the basis is for that predisposition we can't say any one cancer patient has been cured. But I think there are many people now who are treated for cancer and never have it recur, and I don't think this happened a hundred years ago. So I would say individual cases of cancer have been de facto cured, while "cancer" as a whole has not been.

But that all just kind of reinforces the idea that "cure" is an ambiguous term in many ways, which I do not disagree with.

I do remember discussions about HIV where people were unhappy that it couldn't be cured, where people pointed out that no viral infection has ever been cured through outside action, even the common cold. Cures are not easy. When I first heard about diabetes and cures, I wondered that anyone could believe it would ever be curable. I've kind of done the reverse of you -- nowadays, I'm more inclined to think it may be possible. Still not much inclined, but more than I was before.

frizzyrazzy
02-02-2011, 08:35 PM
we can't even decide what's a disease or an illness or a condition. And we can't really decide what is a cure. Lord help the scientists LOL. I think it underlines how hard it is to cure anything. Perhaps what it all seems this way now is that people now are able to live with what used to kill them so even the term "chronic disease " must be a relative recent term.

Lisa P.
02-02-2011, 08:36 PM
And Lisa, I realized that my picture was quite old, and I'm about 20lbs lighter than that picture, so I wanted a bit more modern one.

Yeah, that made me mad too. I can't believe I'm even talking to you. :mad:

Mody_Jess_Pony
02-02-2011, 08:45 PM
I'm not sure if it was a cure or not but when my sister was diagnosed with autoimune heptitis, and her liver was rejecting her body she was put on immno-supressants, An adults dose prednizone and steriods and today her liver is no longer rejecting her body, and she is considered in complete remission/cured and no longer takes those medications. There is always a chance though I believe that it could happen again? But I'm not sure if thats a cure or a treatment.
I know on the asthma front and depression front there isn't much push forward for a cure.

sassypantz
02-02-2011, 08:58 PM
I wouldn't consider an organ transplant a cure for anything, just a treatment (and one with a very high risk of complications). A heart transplant doesn't cure or even heal the diseased heart, it simply replaces it with a substitute.

To be considered a cure, I would assume the patient no longer has to treat the condition on a regular basis.

sooz
02-02-2011, 09:07 PM
Im sorry I didnt see this thread before I asked the same question in the other thread. I personally don't believe that a cure for diabetes would be able to restore the body to pre d condition. That is why I think it is important to figure out how to prevent damage to the body from happening before a cure is found. I think some cancers have been cured and I think that antibiotics have cured millions of people of diseases that were deadly to past generations. Today those illnesses are considered minor because of antibiotics. Rickets has been entirely done away with in first world countries.
I know there must be many other things that have been 'cured' even if you dont count polio, which was the scourge of my own childhood. It was not 'cured' but it was entirely prevented by vaccines. I admit that I lost hope for a while after I read the statement about how nothing has ever been cured..but I dont think that is true.

Marcia
02-02-2011, 09:21 PM
People with arthritis have joint replacements which allow them to resume normal, pain free lives. My mother has high blood pressure, while she is not cured, a once-a-day pill keeps it under control. Cataract and Lasik surgery and cochlear implants certainly improve life.

Nancy in VA
02-02-2011, 09:28 PM
People with arthritis have joint replacements which allow them to resume normal, pain free lives. My mother has high blood pressure, while she is not cured, a once-a-day pill keeps it under control. Cataract and Lasik surgery and cochlear implants certainly improve life.

But I would consider a pill the same as insulin. I would consider a cochlear implant not unlike an insulin pump. They have improved the quality of life, and there are different degrees of the intenstity of the treatment, but they aren't cures.

A lot is being said about replacing parts - it seems that at this point, that is the only real "cure" I've heard. Others are talking about treatments for diseases that used to be dangerous to people that are mere nuisances now. Like Penicillian for certain bacterials illnesses, etc. I guess that's where I'm still trying to understand - are illnesses and diseases the same - are they just synonyms are we just throw them out randomly, or are there illness which are caused by an external entity (bacterial or viral) and diseases that are different? I'm just trying to understand better

hawkeyegirl
02-02-2011, 09:37 PM
I guess I'd consider cancer the closest disease to diabetes for purposes of this discussion that has been "cured." And obviously there's no cancer that's 100% curable, and some of the "cures" for cancer can have some pretty awful side effects. But obviously even cancer isn't a great parallel.

JRA, MS, Lupus...I think those diseases can all go into remission with treatment. (Not always, of course, but sometimes.) Maybe that will happen for diabetes - a treatment that will lead to remission for some.

I don't know. I honestly can't think of a similar disease for which there's been a cure. I consider bacterial infections a different horse altogether.

Lakeman
02-02-2011, 09:43 PM
I am sure there are a number of diseased that used to be chronic but now we have cures for them so they no longer are. For example in the sixteen hundreds a disease called scrofula (a lump on the side of the neck) afflicted people and today either surgery or drugs fixes it.

Epilepsy can be cured with surgery.

Cleft palate and a host of cosmetic or not-so-cosmetic physical deformities can be fixed with surgery.

A variety of diseases that are caused by deficiencies of vitamins or minerals can be cured with supplements.

So far the list of cures is: surgery, supplements, and antibiotics. What about drugs that fix problems but are not antibiotics? I think there are a few genetic cures. Nexium, aspirin are cures for acute issues.

OOh, I got one. How about steroids to cure a variety of skin irritations?

buggle
02-02-2011, 09:44 PM
It's early on with patchy results, but stem cell therapy and gene therapy are showing some promise for the cure of genetic diseases. If you can get a person to produce a protein, where the lack of it is making them sick or killing them with their own body, I'd say that's pretty close to a cure.

I know that we're all used to antibiotics, but within my parents' lifetimes, diseases that antibiotics knock out killed people. My dad's sister died from a strep infection when she was 11 -- pre-antibiotics. If you had TB or a blood infection, you were most likely dead. Antibiotics make it like you were never sick at all in most cases. Before they were discovered, people couldn't really conceive of cures for these bacterial diseases. And though chemo is a crappy treatment in many ways, it has cured cancer -- when people are in remission for 5 years, I think it's usually considered cured.

We're really in the infancy of these therapies -- antibiotics are pretty much post-WWII and vaccines are relatively new. Who would've believed that smallpox could be eradicated a few generations ago? What it took to achieve that was a basic understanding of the immune system and how viruses work, and a revolutionary/innovative idea and some risk taking.

We all say now that autoimmune diseases can't be cured, but at some point someone will understand the mechanism well enough and come up with an idea that keeps the body from attacking itself. That's why we need to fund basic research.

hipmama
02-02-2011, 10:00 PM
I have Meniere's Disease. I feel that I am 'cured', but I still have Meniere's Disease.

Meniere's is a disease of the middle ear that causes ringing in the ears, hearing loss and vertigo. My vertigo was so intense and came on without warning, my life was greatly affected. After 8 years, lots of doctors, lots of treatments, and lots of days where I couldn't get out of bed - I decided to have surgery. Two years ago I had a Vestibular Nerve Section. My skull was opened and a section of my vestibular nerve was removed from the right side. Added bonus is the 6" scar I have to show off whenever people talk about scars. :)

I still have the ringing, I still have some hearing loss - but the vertigo is gone. To me, that is a cure. My life was given back to me.

TheFormerLantusFiend
02-02-2011, 10:11 PM
Syphilis used to be a chronic disease such that tertiary (third stage) syphilis was the major cause of insanity in the United States a hundred years ago, and now tertiary syphilis is virtually unknown here.

Hepatitis C is a chronic disease but a year long course of treatment cures the vast majority of cases. Treatment for it does have side effects, but there is no follow up medication needed.

jade
02-02-2011, 10:15 PM
How about immunotherapy for allergies? Desensitization or hyposensitization is a treatment in which the patient is gradually vaccinated with progressively larger doses of the allergen in question. This can either reduce the severity or eliminate hypersensitivity altogether.


Congenital Blindness
http://www.chop.edu/news/children-with-congenital-blindness-can-see-after-gene-therapy.html

Some Type 2 diabetics have been *cured* after bariatric surgery.

There was a stem cell drug derived from bone marrow that's being used in both Crohns and Graft v Host disease and it's resulted in long term remission of Crohns and reversal of Graft v Host.

Some Kidney diseases such as Minimal change disease can be successfully treated with steroids, with long term or complete remissions.

I consider a person cured if they've had long term remission from Cancer.

joy orz
02-03-2011, 12:15 AM
We aren't the only ones having this conversation.
http://www.the-scientist.com/community/posts/list/20/103.page

Here's my three cents. My dad had polio. He suffered, underwent much treatment and took daily shots for over a year. It was awful. But his daughter and grandchildren don't have to worry about it. He also has a very slight limp, but is otherwise healthy. He wasn't "cured", he recovered.

That said, if I get to see Ava's children live a life where they never have to worry about getting type 1 because a vaccine is found, that will be a beautiful thing.

If some other course of treatment is found where Ava "goes into remission" EVEN if there are flare ups or re-treatments needed, that still will be a beautiful thing.

If there truly is a well working artificial pancreas that will let Ava go off to college, go out on a bender at a party and sleep off her youthful recklessness knowing the pump will administer insulin or glucagon as needed, that will be a beautiful thing.

Ok, that's the two cents part. Here comes the third cent...

I had TERRIBLE allergies growing up. I also had awful chronic stomach issues. I took shots, meds, all sorts of stuff. Turns out that much of my problem was food allergy related, and I had this "incredibly rare disease... 0.03% of the population has it... it's called Celiac" (yep, at the time, no one had heard of it :rolleyes:) Now I am eating my fantastic Udi's blueberry muffin, hot from my microwave and I can't remember the last time I had a stomach ache or took and allergy pill. As a practical matter, as long as I don't eat gluten, I'm cured. In a real life sense, celiac is so well understood now, that I am a target market. YAY me! No seriously... YAY me. I love to eat again. So even though I'm technically not "CURED"... my life is pretty darn good.

If there are advances in medicine that can improve our childrens' lives, even if not officially a "cure", I'm all for it.

lauraqofu
02-03-2011, 04:19 AM
People with arthritis have joint replacements which allow them to resume normal, pain free lives. My mother has high blood pressure, while she is not cured, a once-a-day pill keeps it under control. Cataract and Lasik surgery and cochlear implants certainly improve life.

I'm not certain that osteoarthritis can be considered a disease the way that diabetes is. Osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition, not a disease. Other types of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis which are a disease process, cannot be cured by a joint replacement, because the inflammatory process isn't cured.

I don't think we're anywhere close to a cure for autoimmunity, because we don't really even understand the autoimmune process entirely. We don't understand what causes the body to attack itself...we know that there are triggers and we understand that the immune system attacks healthy tissues, creating antibodies and all of that, but we don't know how to keep the body from creating specific antibodies. The immune system is necessary, obviously, but we don't know how to make it stop or slow down the production of harmful antibodies, without stopping or slowing the production of all antibodies leaving the body defenseless against bacteria and viruses, and until we can do that, there isn't going to be a cure for any autoimmune disease that doesn't cause more harm than it does good.

Nancy in VA
02-03-2011, 08:36 AM
Joy - I get what you are saying about celiac - but Emma has celiac and I would never consider the fact that she gets to eat GF breads that she's cured. It sucks and it sucks more than D. We have trouble eating out because we aren't sure what she can eat or can't. She can't eat what a normal kid eats off of the kids menu because it has gluten in it. Its being "treated" by avoiding the trigger, but its not cured.

I do think there are some other examples here of conditions that are cured. I'm just wondering - are they in the same type of category of T1 and do the methods that were used to determine that cure apply to T1.

I guess I just really feel that ultimately what will happen with T1 is that they will come up with a "vaccine" of some sort that will mean no future people will get it (like the Polio vaccine or Smallpox vaccine) but that those who have it, because its chronic, will continue to have to treat it.

chbarnes
02-03-2011, 08:57 AM
I might have prompted this by things I have said in previous threads, including the JDRF thread yesterday. I don't think antibiotics for infectious disease, or vitamins for dietary deficiencies, like scurvy, are what we have in mind when we talk about a cure. Some lymphomas are successfully treated and many of those people remain disease free for years, but the side effects of chemotherapy are significant and include a risk of developing a second type of cancer later in life.
The point is, cures for chronic disease are rare, complicated, and often come with undesirable tradeoffs. That doesn't mean we stop trying, but we are all trapped with our loved ones on this little island. Let's build shelters, find food, build a big fire to be seen by a passing ship, and explore the possibility of building a raft. In the mean time, let's be kind to each other.

Nancy in VA
02-03-2011, 09:07 AM
Chuck - that's kinda what I was getting at. You had made a comment that I wanted to explore further, but not in that thread. Not to discourage anyone - really as a fact-finding thread - because I'm not knowledgeable about medicine and diseases

seeingspots
02-03-2011, 09:09 AM
If some other course of treatment is found where Ava "goes into remission" EVEN if there are flare ups or re-treatments needed, that still will be a beautiful thing.

If there are advances in medicine that can improve our childrens' lives, even if not officially a "cure", I'm all for it.

I totally agree Joy. I have Rheumatoid Arthritis, and while I may not be "cured", I am technically in remission ... of course, this requires weekly injections of Enbrel medication. I would love something as simple as a shot to put my son in to remission.

But, even then, I would still push for a real cure. While my RA may not be actively flaring (my SED rates are regularly checked), it is still there in the background... it will still take a few years off my life... and whenever it does flare up it can still do irreversible damage to my organs/joints. Also, while the Enbrel is a great treatment, it comes with many side effects and the long time usage is still unknown (infact the package insert states they don't even know for sure how it works "it is thought that Enbrel works by...")

Lisa P.
02-03-2011, 10:41 AM
It's absolutely true that curing T1 would not be the same thing as curing a disease caused by bacteria.

And curing a disease caused by bacteria is not the same as curing a disease caused by a fungus.

And same for parasites. Same for environmental toxins. Same for congenital defects cured through surgery. Same for cancer. Same for autoimmune illnesses. Same for viral diseases.

All of these cures will or do look different because the mechanism for disease is different, and some of these mechanisms we know how to tackle, others we don't yet, others we may never know.

There's really no way to know where T1 fits in that scenario.

Cure, to me, means that ongoing damage and continuing symptoms from the condition itself no longer occur because the cause has been removed.

So, if someone has TB and the bacteria are killed through drug therapy, that person will no longer have damage being done from the bacteria and will no longer have symptoms from the actions of the bacteria in the body. There may be damage done that cannot be undone by removal of the bacteria. The person may develop asthma from damaged lung tissue, and then if viral pneumonia hits her TB will have been a factor in her death. But she's been cured of the TB (consumption was definitely chronic in past generations, I swear every time I read the life of a saint she's coughing up blood).

If someone has cancer that is causing abnormal cell growth, cancer treatments that stop the abnormal growth and remove the abnormal cells, with the activity not recurring over the course of many years until the person's death from other causes -- we can't say for sure there's not some hidden agent still present causing the problem, but I think it's fair to say that's probably a cure. If someone has a predisposition to developing abnormal cells, and the cancer recurs, I'd say that's not a cure, but a substantial and important treatment. Still, if I had a cancer that recurred and needed treatment every five to ten years, I'd not consider myself cured.

Same for heart disease. The underlying condition, if arterial clogging can be blocked with drug therapy, that's treatment. If the clogged arteries can be fixed surgically every ten years, that's treatment. Figuring out why some folks are predisposed to arteries clogging and stopping that action from continuing without ongoing introduction into the body of drugs, that's a cure. Of course, I'm inclined to think of heart disease as less of a disease and more of just a predisposition, the way the body uses cholesterol, which can be both beneficial (when you are younger) and detrimental (when you are older, usually past chlid-bearing years, which means evolution sometimes favors those whose bodies work that way).

So, I guess what I'm saying is that cure means the underlying malfunction or pathogen is removed. Then therapy may be needed to address the damage that has been done. For me, with diabetes, a cure means the autoimmune malfunction is removed. Then treatment would address what is essentially secondary organ damage to the beta cells.

I don't know if this can happen. I sometimes think it can, because smarter people than me say it might. But it's like speculating about whether there is life somewhere in the universe. We can give reasons it might be true. We can give reasons it might not. But we can't know until we know. It's in the great universe of not just unknowns, but unknowables.

I want a cure because I don't want ongoing treatment. But, clearly, the treatment we have now is extremely burdensome so better treatment is a good, also. But no, I don't think better treatment = a cure. And I think folks who donate for a cure need to have the money spent for that purpose, exclusively. I think folks who donate to improve the health and longevity of folks with diabetes, whether through a cure or through better treatment, would be happy with much of what JDRF and others are looking at doing. I appreciate it if they are making an attempt to be forthright about their goals.

Sammerjam
02-03-2011, 12:22 PM
I'm not sure if this should be posted on this thread, but...
I don't know if you can really defined cured...some bacterial infections can be "cured" with antibiotics, etc., but that doesn't mean it goes away forever, and could always return.
That being said, my idea of a cure for diabetes would simply be not having to think about it as I do know, not have to take action everyday to stay healthy, etc. I would consider an artificial pancreas a cure simply because ideally once it was perfected I wouldn't have to THINK about diabetes anymore, and could live my life the way I did before diabetes, even if that means wearing some piece of technology for the rest of my life. I could deal with that "cure".

Lisa P.
02-03-2011, 01:01 PM
I would consider an artificial pancreas a cure simply because ideally once it was perfected I wouldn't have to THINK about diabetes anymore, and could live my life the way I did before diabetes, even if that means wearing some piece of technology for the rest of my life. I could deal with that "cure".

That's a very good point -- if I thought an artificial pancreas could actually simulate a real one I'd be much more likely to consider it somewhere near the definition of a cure -- I suspect a lot of the kickback about an AP being considered a "cure" comes from the assumption that it would work about as well as pumps and cgms tech works now -- handy and helpful, but often more work rather than less, and certainly not tech that makes diabetes in any way disappear.

If I'm wrong, and you could implant a device that would work as fluidly and automatically as a pacemaker and make diabetes "go away", I wouldn't care if you called it a cure or called it Sally and dressed it in heels. :D

Annapolis Mom
02-04-2011, 10:06 AM
As I think about chronic diseases being cured, I also like to remember that type 1 diabetes was once a short-term fatal disease that has been turned into a long-term chronic disease.