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wilf
10-10-2010, 08:49 PM
The discussion in another thread has gotten me curious.

Here in Ontario, I can walk into my nearest 24-hour pharmacy and buy any insulin over the counter (no prescription) as long as I'm willing to pay cash. For it to be covered by insurance, a prescription is needed. I know it's the same in Germany.

So what's up in the good old U.S. of A.? Do you need a prescription to get insulin under all circumstances? And if not, then under what circumstances can you get it over the counter?

Flutterby
10-10-2010, 08:50 PM
I believe the only insulin you can get in the US without a prescription is regular.

Amy C.
10-10-2010, 08:53 PM
I believe the only insulin you can get in the US without a prescription is regular.

I think that NPH is over the counter as well.

MamaBear
10-10-2010, 08:57 PM
I saw that and was googling to find out. I can't get an answer I just see ads for ordering from Canada. What is meant by "regular insulin?":confused:

jcanolson
10-10-2010, 08:57 PM
I believe it varies state to state. Let's just say that nothing that I would want to give a small child is available over-the-counter. :cwds:

TheFormerLantusFiend
10-10-2010, 09:02 PM
Some of the insulins are over the counter and some aren't (I think Regular and NPH is correct) but there's the additional issue of syringes and needles, which in many states are illegal to buy without prescription. Here in Illinois, it's legal to buy 20 syringes or needles as long as you're 18 (that was the very first thing I got carded on) but the attitude that pharmacists will give you is fierce!

timsma
10-10-2010, 09:05 PM
I saw that and was googling to find out. I can't get an answer I just see ads for ordering from Canada. What is meant by "regular insulin?":confused:

Regular insulin is what was available for a short acting insulin before the humalog/novolog/apidra became available. You used it with NPH. It was not a good regime for a toddler, that's for sure!

Wilf, no insulin is available in MN over the counter other than regular and nph that I'm aware of. And if one is not trained in the use of those insulins, it could be dangerous and I could see where the poster of the thread you are speaking of could get in trouble for even trying to use such insulins without training.

MamaBear
10-10-2010, 09:15 PM
Regular insulin is what was available for a short acting insulin before the humalog/novolog/apidra became available. You used it with NPH. It was not a good regime for a toddler, that's for sure!
.
Thank you.

dianas
10-10-2010, 09:20 PM
I posted in the other thread but just confirming only Reg, NPH, and I believe 70/30 are available over the counter in the US. This may not be true in all states. And even if it is available it isn't always easy to get. Syringes are another story as Jonah noted.

Lawana
10-10-2010, 09:22 PM
Here is a link that shows that all 50 states require prescriptions for analog insulins. http://www.isletsofhope.com/diabetes/state-law/state-prescription-laws.html
ETA: Most states, as has been noted by other posters, do not require Rx for older insulins.

Sarah Maddie's Mom
10-10-2010, 09:25 PM
Which begs the question, why would a diagnosed type 1 need to be able to obtain insulin without a prescription?

Amy C.
10-10-2010, 09:42 PM
They need a bottle of insulin, but cannot get a prescription. They may be out of town or in the instance that precipated this thread, the noncustodial parent who needs a new bottle of insulin because the custodial parent did not give them a fresh bottle of insulin for the child's visit and the endo would not allow them to have a new bottle.

czardoust
10-10-2010, 10:01 PM
you can get R and NPH w/o a prescription. When my mom went to Belize a few years ago she bought some from her local CVS over the counter and took it to Belize, gave it to the people w equipment that was donated by CWD :)

TheFormerLantusFiend
10-10-2010, 10:11 PM
Which begs the question, why would a diagnosed type 1 need to be able to obtain insulin without a prescription?

In addition to the reasons already given, a person without insurance may not want to go see a doctor every year to get prescriptions.
Or you could just find you're at work, two hours away from home, and you forgot your stuff :o. But there's a pharmacy across the street!

Sarah Maddie's Mom
10-10-2010, 10:21 PM
Well yes - it's terribly inconvenient to actually have to get a prescription for a drug you'll be using all your life :rolleyes:

Fine, I'm sure there are instances when OTC insulin could be more convenient, but I'm not sure the convenience trade off is worth the risk of nut job parents (think munchausen by proxy) having easy access or anyone else who might have a nefarious use in mind.

TheFormerLantusFiend
10-10-2010, 10:35 PM
But you have to get a new prescription every year. Prescriptions expire every year or more often (prescriptions for anabolic steroids and narcotics expire faster). Anybody who is ever diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is not going to have trouble turning up a once-upon-a-time prescription, they might have trouble getting a current one.

Since NPH and Regular are available and syringes (especially dirty ones) not hard to find, I don't see how making analog insulins prescription only prevents anybody from using insulin to make themselves sick.

The only rationale I can think of for making them prescription only is that insurance companies are often more willing to pay for something if it isn't "over the counter". I mean, that's why they say they won't pay for my ketone strips.

Flutterby
10-10-2010, 10:44 PM
Well yes - it's terribly inconvenient to actually have to get a prescription for a drug you'll be using all your life :rolleyes:

Fine, I'm sure there are instances when OTC insulin could be more convenient, but I'm not sure the convenience trade off is worth the risk of nut job parents (think munchausen by proxy) having easy access or anyone else who might have a nefarious use in mind.

I don't think insulin, any insulin, should be available without a prescription.. I do have a friend that keeps a vial of regular in her house, for her cats.. they are lantus twice a day, but sometimes one of them gets regular for really high bgs.

sarahspins
10-10-2010, 11:22 PM
I don't think insulin, any insulin, should be available without a prescription.

Are you so sure? Think about how many people would end up in the hospital in DKA if these insulins were unavailable, likely with very large bills they can't afford to pay...

Most of the people who use Regular and NPH and are buying them over the counter are probably uninsured and can't afford the doctor's visit to GET a prescription another insulin... never mind the fact that the analogs cost 2-3X as much per vial and they probably couldn't afford that either.

FWIW, when it was still available, Lente was also OTC.. but with the newer long acting analogs coming to the market, it was discontinued a while back.

wilf
10-11-2010, 01:39 AM
I think it really looks bad on the US that you can't get modern insulins without a prescription - who exactly is being served by such a pointless restriction?!

miss_behave
10-11-2010, 04:15 AM
I think it really looks bad on the US that you can't get modern insulins without a prescription - who exactly is being served by such a pointless restriction?!

I honestly don't think insulin should be available over the counter. It can be quite dangerous if used incorrectly, and therefore its availability should be controlled IMHO.
In saying that, we have a different situation here. No Australian would want to buy insulin without a prescription as they then would not be offered it at a significantly subsidised price as per the government's Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme e.g the patient pays $33.30 or $5.40 per Lantus prescription, the government pays the remaining $432. Who would want to pay that out of pocket?!
Those struggling financially are entitled to have a concession/health care card, so they do not have to pay for doctor's appointments and therefore shouldn't have difficulty obtaining a prescription due to financial means.

Sarah Maddie's Mom
10-11-2010, 08:00 AM
I think it really looks bad on the US that you can't get modern insulins without a prescription - who exactly is being served by such a pointless restriction?!




Here in Ontario, I can walk into my nearest 24-hour pharmacy and buy any insulin over the counter . I know it's the same in Germany.

So what's up in the good old U.S. of A.? Do you need a prescription to get insulin under all circumstances? And if not, then under what circumstances can you get it over the counter?

Wilf, it was pretty obvious from your OP that you had an agenda.:rolleyes:

Flutterby
10-11-2010, 08:16 AM
Are you so sure? Think about how many people would end up in the hospital in DKA if these insulins were unavailable, likely with very large bills they can't afford to pay...

Most of the people who use Regular and NPH and are buying them over the counter are probably uninsured and can't afford the doctor's visit to GET a prescription another insulin... never mind the fact that the analogs cost 2-3X as much per vial and they probably couldn't afford that either.

FWIW, when it was still available, Lente was also OTC.. but with the newer long acting analogs coming to the market, it was discontinued a while back.

Insulin in the wrong hands can be very dangerous.

Flutterby
10-11-2010, 08:17 AM
I think it really looks bad on the US that you can't get modern insulins without a prescription - who exactly is being served by such a pointless restriction?!

There are certain things that you should have to have a prescription for. Insulin being one of them.. using it wrong or in the wrong hands it can be very dangerous.

joan
10-11-2010, 08:27 AM
I think it really looks bad on the US that you can't get modern insulins without a prescription - who exactly is being served by such a pointless restriction?!

I think the US has bigger issues they are dealing with that maybe don't look so good for the US right now. I don't think needing an rx for insulin is one of them.

Lee
10-11-2010, 08:36 AM
Insulin is used illegally by body builders since it is a growth hormone. People use it to speed healing by adding insulin and sugar after a muscle injury, And small doses of insulin are illegally used for an 'anti-aging' affect. It also used to be used as a shock treatment for mentally ill.

Don't know if any of these work, but this is the same reason why steroids are by RX only - to help prevent it from being abused.

Honestly -not to bazaar. There is a whole list of drugs I wouldn't want my kid to be able to walk into a pharmacy to buy without an RX.

MReinhardt
10-11-2010, 08:39 AM
One of the biggest concerns. IF insulin was over the counter med all the time, most insurance companies do not pay for over the counter meds. For those who who have medicare/medicare/private insurance would not kick in.

Chell's endo wrote a script for Apidra 6 bottles a month, to a tune of $648.00+ There is no way Chell would be able to afford that IF it was over the counter, and insurance would not pay for it. Novolog would cost her close to the same amount. Since I do not know the cost of regular insulin, I cant compare the out of pocket cost.

I believe is best that its kept as a script so Insurance covers it.

Deal
10-11-2010, 09:01 AM
I think it really looks bad on the US that you can't get modern insulins without a prescription - who exactly is being served by such a pointless restriction?!

Take the case where someone who 'thinks' they need insulin, walks into the pharmacy and gets it over the counter then proceeds to kill themselves. The lawyers would have a field day in the US.

MichS
10-11-2010, 09:41 AM
I'm in Canada. So far we've gotten ds's insulin at the same local pharmacy every time. I guess it might be a bit of a safety net to know that if we were out of town and ran out/lost/etc insulin we could go into any pharmacy and get some otc. But, I can understand the other side of the story as to why it needs a prescription in the US.

thebestnest5
10-11-2010, 10:04 AM
I have a relative who went to the endo regularly for many years. His health insurance termed him soon after he was dx'd. So, all appointments and Rx's are out of pocket cost.

After many years of every appointment, being "no changes, you're doing great" "you know more about your D " --the person made the decision that few endo appointments were needed. The endo knows the decision and understands.

He's always used NPH and R. He pays for his insulin and syringes without a prescription and without insurance coverage. He goes to the doctor--when needed and not on a schedule--paying out of pocket.

His A1C's have been good--he can test those with an A1c kit OTC from the pharmacy.

I can see both sides of this issue, however knowing that OTC NPH and R have benefited someone that I know--I am glad they are available.

valerie k
10-11-2010, 10:32 AM
heck, I would LOVE it if many drugs where just OTC and I could just pick them up at my leisure. Lets have tylenol with codeine available becouse I should be able to self diagnose when I need it. Bladder infection drugs, I would be so there... Vicoden... would be another great one. and antibiotics... Should be right there for me to pick up, no dr visit required. And thats is where I see the pattern for why these drugs are perscription only.

The potential for the over abuse is astronomical. Tho, those who dont need and have abusive tendencies, will find a way anyways.

However, I but the dogs insulin OTC its 24.50 a bottle. 70/30 (walmart reli-on, the generic... the non-generic is 50.00). And I pay out of pocket for thier syringes... But we dont have any restrictions on syringes here. I didnt need a perscription to get them.

thebestnest5
10-11-2010, 10:42 AM
However, I but the dogs insulin OTC its 24.50 a bottle. 70/30 (walmart reli-on, the generic... the non-generic is 50.00). And I pay out of pocket for thier syringes... But we dont have any restrictions on syringes here. I didnt need a perscription to get them.


Not every state allows Wal-mart to operate a pharmacy and sell Reli-on insulin. NPH and R are around $45-$50/bottle in North Dakota.

Hmmm....North Dakota borders Canada.;)

sarahspins
10-11-2010, 03:25 PM
Insulin in the wrong hands can be very dangerous.

I'm not arguing that, but are your volunteering to pay for the cost of an exam (that is probably not needed or wanted) for someone who is uninsured just to get a prescription? Do you realize how much that would cost? Do you realize just how low on a list of priorities that ends up being?

I'm glad that most of you have never experienced being diabetic and UNINSURED. You'd realize very quickly how non-essential seeing a doctor to get a prescription actually is... especially when you've got to scrape together enough money just to buy insulin and test strips. Trust me, I've BTDT and it really sucks.

hawkeyegirl
10-11-2010, 03:29 PM
Well, I'm truly not sure I understand why Regular and NPH are available without a prescription and the analogs are not. They're all equally dangerous in the wrong hands. I don't think it's an insurance thing, either. I can buy test strips and lancets OTC, but my insurance still covers them. There must be some reason this makes sense to the FDA, heck if I can see it.

That being said, I'm not sure this is a glaring black eye on the face of American society.

Lisa P.
10-11-2010, 03:42 PM
I think this is a philosophical issue, and I do think it's a shame that a nation full of rugged individualists feels the need to make laws to protect ourselves from insulin purchase.

I think people should be able to make their own decisions about their purchases and their health unless there's a particular reason why they have given up that right or there is something particular about the product. Narcotics, for example, I think should be available only with prescription. Insulin, not so much. Yes, it can be used improperly. So can ibuprofen. I think in the case of hurting another person with insulin, since you'd have to inject it it's a much less effective weapon than other chemicals or devices. As for abuse, seems to me you simply make it available only to adults and then either criminalize its misuse or let people deal with the consequences of the misuse they have chosen (like we do with those who choose to smoke cigarettes or, like me, develop a two pack (of Twix) a day habit).

Given all of this, I think it's also impossible to get a pump or a cgms in the U.S. without a prescription. I find that insane and, as I've said elsewhere, I hope they don't push it soon so that I can't buy a crutch, a thermometer, or a blood pressure cuff without a doctor giving me permission.

mickey's mom
10-11-2010, 04:28 PM
I think that it is amazing to see how 2 countries that have so many similarities differ so much when it comes to medicines available with or without a prescription. Up until a couple of months ago, Naproxin, which is sold as Aleve was only available by prescription in Canada, and we cannot by Mucinex here at all, however we can buy Insulin and anti-nausea medicine at any pharmacy.

Flutterby
10-11-2010, 04:55 PM
I'm not arguing that, but are your volunteering to pay for the cost of an exam (that is probably not needed or wanted) for someone who is uninsured just to get a prescription? Do you realize how much that would cost? Do you realize just how low on a list of priorities that ends up being?

I'm glad that most of you have never experienced being diabetic and UNINSURED. You'd realize very quickly how non-essential seeing a doctor to get a prescription actually is... especially when you've got to scrape together enough money just to buy insulin and test strips. Trust me, I've BTDT and it really sucks.

I know what its like to worry about a none insured diabetic as we are there now. I still do not think insulin should be available without a prescription. Generally prescriptions are good once a year.. So you go to the endo or family dr. or NP once a year and get prescription for it... A lot of things in life are expensive, and frankly I don't know how people do it some times.. but that doesn't mean insulin should be available without a prescription.. and like someone else pointed out.. if it were ALL to become OTC, well, we'd ALL be paying out of pocket.

KHM
10-11-2010, 05:05 PM
Which begs the question, why would a diagnosed type 1 need to be able to obtain insulin without a prescription?

Heh heh---for the cowboys. I wanted to be able to give Regular with our Novolog and our first (and former) endo said no go. So I went to the pharmacy and bought it. Along with a box of syringes and needles--no prescription, hand the man the money, out the door. PIZZA!!!

KHM
10-11-2010, 06:27 PM
There are certain things that you should have to have a prescription for. Insulin being one of them.. using it wrong or in the wrong hands it can be very dangerous.

I wish people had to have prescriptions for handguns. And semi-automatic weapons. Those are almost as dangerous as insulin.

KHM
10-11-2010, 06:31 PM
Wilf, it was pretty obvious from your OP that you had an agenda.:rolleyes:

What is his agenda? Its not obvious to me.

Sarah Maddie's Mom
10-11-2010, 06:33 PM
What is his agenda? Its not obvious to me.

Just cause you haven't known him as long as I have ;)

KHM
10-11-2010, 06:41 PM
I think the US has bigger issues they are dealing with that maybe don't look so good for the US right now. I don't think needing an rx for insulin is one of them.

The implication being that countries that do make insulin available OTC don't have bigger fishes to fry...?

KHM
10-11-2010, 06:46 PM
Well, I'm truly not sure I understand why Regular and NPH are available without a prescription and the analogs are not. They're all equally dangerous in the wrong hands. I don't think it's an insurance thing, either. I can buy test strips and lancets OTC, but my insurance still covers them. There must be some reason this makes sense to the FDA, heck if I can see it.

I *do* think its an insurance issue, actually. There's no question it costs more to produce the analogs. Given the choice of using naturally derived insulins (cheaper) versus the analogs, all OTC, in the end consumers are going to choose the less expensive option the majority of the time. The prescription requirement keeps insurance companies paying the bulk of the costs for the analogs. Per this example, sure, my glucose test strips and lancets are covered by my insurance *IF* I have a prescription. If I don't, and I have indeed used more than my prescription in one month, then I pay full retail out of pocket.

joan
10-11-2010, 07:59 PM
The implication being that countries that do make insulin available OTC don't have bigger fishes to fry...?

I never said or implied that at all. All i was saying was that I don't think the issue has any reflection at all at how others view the US. WILF stated that it looks bad for the US and I implied that The US was dealing with much more urgent issues that have a reflection on us, not whether insulin is available without a Rx

Ali
10-11-2010, 10:53 PM
As a long time T1 I have often wondered many a time about the insurance and prescription issue. I assume that it makes more money for the Pharmaceuticals to have their drugs and "devices" (insulin pumps/Cgms) as prescription items than non, and that is why they are that way. I think they should be both as meters and strips are. :o:cwds: Ali

Lisa P.
10-12-2010, 07:21 AM
I *do* think its an insurance issue, actually. There's no question it costs more to produce the analogs. Given the choice of using naturally derived insulins (cheaper) versus the analogs, all OTC, in the end consumers are going to choose the less expensive option the majority of the time. The prescription requirement keeps insurance companies paying the bulk of the costs for the analogs.

Nail on the head.

Nancy in VA
10-12-2010, 07:25 AM
There might also be a patent aspect to this. I don't know if some of the patents mean it needs to be prescription vs OTC, or maybe it goes to OTC when the patent expires.

To use Naproxen Sodium as the example someone from Canada said above - its been OTC in the states for a while. But not forever - maybe 8 years or so. I was prescribed it in college as part of my migraine treatment. Imagine my delight when it came OTC

thebestnest5
10-12-2010, 10:07 AM
If it's truly about insulin falling into the hands of someone with a non-diabetic, criminal mind... And, not about dictating and judging how other people choose to manage health and their healthcare budget...


Maybe it could be examined why the insulin Rx is typically written to expire in 6 months or 1 year...especially WHEN, it's been documented the T1 Diabetic patient is extremely, well qualified to adjust insulin doses and has been doing so for years with good A1C's.


How about having an Rx on file that does not expire or Diabetes Dx documentation to be presented to pharmacies?--so only Diabetics can obtain their needed insulin and are not forced to go to a doctor on a six month to one year time frame? What if they feel that they can go to the doctor every 2 years? Is that really something that needs to be dictated?


Additionally, there could be showing of ID at the pharmacy and having that recorded for insulin pick up.

wa6fhx
11-17-2011, 10:04 PM
I believe insulin should always be available over-the-counter. I buy insulin OTC because it's cheaper. I have a prescription for Novolin R & Novolin 70/30 but using it and the co-pay from my insurance is nearly $30/vial! I can buy Humulin R & Humulin 70/30 for under $25/vial OTC! My insurance doesn't cover Humulin, only Novolin brand though the insulins are the same! I am saving at least $20/month by buying Humulin OTC. My doctor agrees with how I buy it. This is in Washington State purchasing at a Wal-Mart pharmacy.

Lee
11-17-2011, 10:39 PM
I believe insulin should always be available over-the-counter. I buy insulin OTC because it's cheaper. I have a prescription for Novolin R & Novolin 70/30 but using it and the co-pay from my insurance is nearly $30/vial! I can buy Humulin R & Humulin 70/30 for under $25/vial OTC! My insurance doesn't cover Humulin, only Novolin brand though the insulins are the same! I am saving at least $20/month by buying Humulin OTC. My doctor agrees with how I buy it. This is in Washington State purchasing at a Wal-Mart pharmacy.

However, this regimen is not the standard for today's medical care, at least in the US. Humalog, Novalog.


Edit - Just saw that the original post was over a year ago.

caspi
11-17-2011, 10:55 PM
Another old post being bumped up by a first time poster...... :rolleyes:

swellman
11-17-2011, 11:03 PM
Another old post being bumped up by a first time poster...... :rolleyes:

It's the thread zombie apocalypse.

caspi
11-17-2011, 11:05 PM
It's the thread zombie apocalypse.

LOL, I do believe you are correct!!! :eek: ;)

funnygrl
11-18-2011, 12:24 AM
I think it really looks bad on the US that you can't get modern insulins without a prescription - who exactly is being served by such a pointless restriction?!

There have been cases of people abusing insulin. There are cases where people with M?nchausen Syndrome inject insulin to experience hypoglycemia and get attention. I've also heard of body builders using it to bulk up. R and N are available due to their age.

funnygrl
11-18-2011, 12:26 AM
Are you so sure? Think about how many people would end up in the hospital in DKA if these insulins were unavailable, likely with very large bills they can't afford to pay...

Most of the people who use Regular and NPH and are buying them over the counter are probably uninsured and can't afford the doctor's visit to GET a prescription another insulin... never mind the fact that the analogs cost 2-3X as much per vial and they probably couldn't afford that either.

FWIW, when it was still available, Lente was also OTC.. but with the newer long acting analogs coming to the market, it was discontinued a while back.

People could end up in the hospital if they can't go to the doctor to get antibiotics for an infection, beta blockers for their hypertension, chemotherapy for the cancer, etc. Should we make all of those things over the counter too? Maybe we should just do away with prescriptions all together. No one is taking them just for fun. If you're buying one, it's because you need it to treat something.

funnygrl
11-18-2011, 12:30 AM
Whoops- sorry, just realized how old this is.

Ellen
11-18-2011, 05:18 PM
I believe insulin should always be available over-the-counter. I buy insulin OTC because it's cheaper. I have a prescription for Novolin R & Novolin 70/30 but using it and the co-pay from my insurance is nearly $30/vial! I can buy Humulin R & Humulin 70/30 for under $25/vial OTC! My insurance doesn't cover Humulin, only Novolin brand though the insulins are the same! I am saving at least $20/month by buying Humulin OTC. My doctor agrees with how I buy it. This is in Washington State purchasing at a Wal-Mart pharmacy.

Welcome to the forums.

Frankly I think NPH is more dangerous than Humalog, because it was much harder for us to predict how NPH would work. Of course that was 16 years ago.

liasmommy2000
11-18-2011, 07:15 PM
I've heard that Reg and NPH are. At least in certain states. Not sure how true that is.

Pauji5
11-18-2011, 07:19 PM
I think this is a philosophical issue, and I do think it's a shame that a nation full of rugged individualists feels the need to make laws to protect ourselves from insulin purchase.

I think people should be able to make their own decisions about their purchases and their health unless there's a particular reason why they have given up that right or there is something particular about the product. Narcotics, for example, I think should be available only with prescription. Insulin, not so much. Yes, it can be used improperly. So can ibuprofen. I think in the case of hurting another person with insulin, since you'd have to inject it it's a much less effective weapon than other chemicals or devices. As for abuse, seems to me you simply make it available only to adults and then either criminalize its misuse or let people deal with the consequences of the misuse they have chosen (like we do with those who choose to smoke cigarettes or, like me, develop a two pack (of Twix) a day habit).

Given all of this, I think it's also impossible to get a pump or a cgms in the U.S. without a prescription. I find that insane and, as I've said elsewhere, I hope they don't push it soon so that I can't buy a crutch, a thermometer, or a blood pressure cuff without a doctor giving me permission.

I SOOOOO Agree!

Connie(BC)Type 1
11-19-2011, 10:31 AM
I don't think I've ever had a Rx for insulin or D supplies. The pharmacist gives me a receipt with their name as the Doc or insurance wouldn't reimburse me. The only time I needed anything was when the gov of BC decided they knew all about diabetes and wouldn't let pharmacies sell BG TESTING STRIPS with out a letter of training!

deafmack
11-20-2011, 04:16 AM
I believe the only insulin you can get in the US without a prescription is regular.

Here in Washington you can also get NPH without a prescription. Of course if you want insurance to cover your insulin then you do need the prescription.

funnygrl
11-20-2011, 08:37 AM
Welcome to the forums.

Frankly I think NPH is more dangerous than Humalog, because it was much harder for us to predict how NPH would work. Of course that was 16 years ago.

It's much harder for a healthy person to get seriously ill from a long acting insulin than a short acting one, particularly if they purposefully overdose. The body just has longer to "cope" with it rather than getting an onslaught all at once.

Nonetheless, I'm sure NPH and R would both be prescription if FDA approved today. So would aspirin probably too, though.