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Seans Dad
07-25-2006, 11:58 AM
:)
Yesterday was Sean's big day. He had his OmniPod hooked up after sitting in a box for a week, he was a little excited to say the least.
We decided on the omnipod for several reasons. First, he is an active kid and does not need to worry about tubing or disconnecting. Second, he loves to swim and although we live in Pennsylvania he swims year round(we have two indoor waterparks nearby). The idea of disconnecting and connecting while swimming with a traditional pump or playing sports was reason enough to choose the omnipod.
The pod itself is not as small as it appears but it is also not large enough to be uncomfortable.
Some people have said that a downside to it is that you need to carry the controller (PDA like device) to use the omnipod, that is true. But how is this a downside? You also have to carry the pump unit with a traditional insulin pump as well as your glucose meter. With the omnipod the controller has the glucose meter built into it, so when you take your blood and add your carbs it tells you how much insulin you should take.
If you should loose the controller the pod connected to your body will continue to deliver background insulin until the pod expires.
Today was also his first day at Diabetes camp which is free and sponsored by the local hospital and diabetes center and within 10 minutes the hospital staff and volunteers were alreading checking it out and telling him how cool it is. Which is a big deal to a 13 y/o boy concerned about his apperance.
I'll let you know how it progresses as we use it more. Tonight he is fasting to make sure his background insulin is being delivered at the right levels.
Feel free to contact me with any questions!

rmccully2000
07-25-2006, 10:36 PM
Congratulations!! I am so jealous ;) We're in Texas and they can't tell us how long we will have to wait before they are available here. Please keep us updated on how he likes it. I'm sure from all the positive attention he got at camp, he's in heaven!
Becky

Seans Dad
07-27-2006, 02:33 PM
Well, we found out a few things the hard way. First pay attention during training and read the manual a few times!!!
Sean had his pulled off during football yesterday(omnipod said stomach placement isn't the best spot for contact sports)
We then tried to activate a new pod and it failed, we tried activating another pod and that one failed. Ah-oh, I was thinking we made a bad choice. After a frantic call to the insulet corp, I found out it was user error.
We didn't deactivate the old pod AND did not fill the pod with at least 85 units of insulin. Omnipod tech support is AWESOME, they even offered to send us replacement pods at no charge.
Some thoughts about the Pod:
The controller(PDA device) is almost idiot proof and so simple to use. I love the fact that it has a food diary, but what I love even more is that it has a user food log that you can add foods you eat and the carbs associated with them. We have already added Seans favorite N.Y. Cheesecake slice, his favorite Rita's water ice and his favorite slice of pizza from the local pizza place.
I am concerned though about the pod coming off during high impact sports. I was advised to wrap the area the pod is in with an ace bandage, so we will see how that goes.

Seans Dad
07-27-2006, 02:40 PM
One more note, for any of you hesitant about the omnipod because of pricing, etc. They do offer a 30 day trial on the omnipod. Each pod costs 30.00, the first controller is $800.00 additional controllers are $300.00.
Monthly omnipod cost is 10 pods x 30.00 = $300.00
They will work with people who have no insurance or limited coverage. Please keep in mind I am in S.E. Pennsylvania and I don't know if they offer the same thing everywhere the omnipod is available.

rmccully2000
07-27-2006, 03:34 PM
Wow you guys are really going to put it to the test with football! I can't wait to see how it fares. If the pods make it through that test, the first grade playground should no problem. Please keep us updated. Since I can't get my hands on one for a trial anytime soon, I'm living vicariously through others :D

Thanks for all the great info.
Becky,
Mom to Mason, 6

hold48398
07-27-2006, 03:50 PM
Yet another awesome, motivating and uplifting post! Yay!!! Thanks for posting your experience, please keep it coming!!!

rmccully2000
07-30-2006, 01:45 PM
How would your son rate the pain associated with the pod insertion? On a scale from 1 to 10 with 10 being "give me some morphine pain" :) Just curiuos as there was mention on another thread of pod pain.
Thanks!
Becky

Seans Dad
07-31-2006, 02:04 PM
Well. the insertion of the cannula he said would be a 3, but it's over in a second. he said it's like someone flicked you with a finger.
He has a problem with the adhesive irritating his skin. We now use iv pads on his skin and put the pod on top of that.
We found he likes the pod on the small of his back the best.

Seans Dad
08-01-2006, 05:17 PM
Quick update - 3 days of swimming and waterslides and the pod is still attached. Time to put on a new pod tonight. So far so good!

rmccully2000
08-01-2006, 09:47 PM
Great! Thanks for the update. Sounds like you guys are giving it a good try out with football and water slides! We have a fantastic waterpark about an hour from here (Schlitterbahn) and Mason is going to be old enough soon to start the big rides. I can't wait :)

RobinKop
08-03-2006, 05:34 PM
Thanks for all the updates - I've been watching OmniPod closely.

I'm just in the begining stages of pump research for my 4-year old little girl. But you mentioned the pod requires 85 units of insulin to be loaded?

Kim's only using about 7 units a day right now - can that insulin be transfered to the next pod? Or would we be wasting a lot of insulin if she only goes through 21 units with her 3 days on the pod?

I'm sure OmniPod probably isn't even approved for little ones yet - but I'm just trying to figure out how all this stuff works. The OmniPods sure do look cool!

Thanks again for sharing your experiences!

Twyla
08-04-2006, 08:16 AM
Robin,

At our last visit our nurse educator explained the different pumps to us, including the Omnipod. She said it had been approved for use in kids in May. It's probably only available in certain areas but it does have some approval. We're also watching closely.

Twyla

Seans Dad
08-04-2006, 02:31 PM
Thanks for all the updates - I've been watching OmniPod closely.

I'm just in the begining stages of pump research for my 4-year old little girl. But you mentioned the pod requires 85 units of insulin to be loaded?

Kim's only using about 7 units a day right now - can that insulin be transfered to the next pod? Or would we be wasting a lot of insulin if she only goes through 21 units with her 3 days on the pod?

I'm sure OmniPod probably isn't even approved for little ones yet - but I'm just trying to figure out how all this stuff works. The OmniPods sure do look cool!

Thanks again for sharing your experiences!

Hello. Yes, we have been able to remove insulin from pods. I don't know if it's a practice omnipod approves of, but we do try to remove any extra insulin from the old pod.

Seans Dad
08-04-2006, 02:34 PM
I was talking to another parent who has a son on a mini med. She wants to switch her son to the omnipod. When he sleeps at night he often gets a kink in the tubing because he toss and turns a lot. He also has about 4 feet of tubing, I don't know if this is common or not.

kiwikid
08-04-2006, 04:48 PM
We use 50cm of tubing wrapped around a tube-guard to prevent kinks:cwds:

Seans Dad
08-08-2006, 10:21 PM
We had a dead pod last night, it wouldn't insert the canula. Called Omnipod they sent out a replacement. We were able to get out all but 5cc of the insulin out of the dead pod as well.

Seans Dad
08-08-2006, 10:24 PM
By the way, if you decide to use the omnipod, try using iv3000 pads. They really help cut down on skin irritation.

payam7777777
08-12-2006, 11:46 AM
Congatulations, Mmmm... from the buttom of my heart,
So exhilirating. Your good news made my day. I'm jealous too and currently experiencing a sever case of device envy. Nice job, dad, and good choice. I'll knock on wood. Keep us updated. I'm 100% with OmniPod. And have spent quite a time reading about it. This no-tube idea is quite something -beyond doubt. It's so discreet. It's fantabulous. Very cool indeed. You're now surfing on the wave of future pumps.
I'm Payam. My beloved 3 year old nephew was discovered to be diabetic type 1 aroud 20 days ago. My sorrow is beyond belief. After spending some time on the web we decided that CSII therapy is a must and OmniPod is THE choice. Turns out OmniPod is not yet? distributed outside the States. FDA has approved it just for inside the States. And naturally a prescription is needed. Thing is, we are living in Iran and we are contemplating medical visa to Diabetes Mecca (Joslin clinic in Boston) in search of better care and specifically OmniPod. I'm so down I can barely breathe. Let me know your email (mine is payam7777777@hotmail.com) I'm gonna need to keep in touch with people like you.


. Here's another mom using OmniGodSend i should say for her litte child:
http://community.diabetes.org/n/pfx/forum.aspx?nav=messages&tsn=1&tid=4359&webtag=adaparents

. Upload some photos man.

. They say the 'embedded' glucometer uses FreeStyle test strips. Does it work with BD's .3uL lancet device With the 33G lancets?

. Where did you switch to this pump? Which clinic?

. What type insulin do you use? Lispro or NovoRapid or other?

. "Diabetes camp which is free and sponsored by the local hospital"
What hospital exactly?

. How long did the process take? One week? Two?

. What's YOUR opinion about using an OmniPod for a 3 year old nephew whose cusin is alive only when he is between 90 and 130?

. Here's the list of my links on OmniPod.
Brand New OmniPod User
http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showthread.php?t=1065

New Products: OmniPod(tm)Insulin Management System
http://www.diabetesincontrol.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=2664

A forum thread on OmniPod
http://community.diabetes.org/n/pfx/forum.aspx?nav=messages&tsn=1&tid=4359&webtag=adaparents

On OmniPod
http://www.diabetesincontrol.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=2680

Pump Without Tubing Coming Soon
http://www.diabetesmine.com/2005/07/pump_without_tu.html

OmniPoding
http://www.diabetesmine.com/2005/11/omnipoding.html

Close Encounter: an OmniPod User
http://www.diabetesmine.com/2005/11/close_encounter.html

OmniPod is Off and Pumping!
http://www.thediabetesblog.com/2005/12/06/omnipod-is-off-and-pumping/

More on the Omnipod
http://www.kweaver.org/archives/2005/07/more_on_the_omn.html

Omnipod Specs
http://www.kweaver.org/archives/2005/05/omnipod_specs.html

The Allure of "Omnipod"...at least on film
http://insulinpumpdemystified.blogspot.com/2006/05/allure-of-omnipodat-least-on-film.html

The Omnipodô Integrated Insulin Delivery and Glucose Monitoring System
http://www.medgadget.com/archives/2005/07/the_omnipod_int.html

Complete Services for a Successful Pump Experience
http://www.integrateddiabetes.com/pump_c.shtml

Create an insulin pump alternative that is discrete and easy-to-use
http://www.reedlink.com/SingleArticle~ContentId~59603~pub~MD.html

Insulet Corporation
http://www.lcpartners.com/enews/newsletter/2006-03_newsletter/index_email.html#company_2

Take care.

Seans Dad
08-15-2006, 05:53 PM
. They say the 'embedded' glucometer uses FreeStyle test strips. Does it work with BD's .3uL lancet device With the 33G lancets?

Yes it does!

. Where did you switch to this pump? Which clinic?

http://www.lvh.org/services/excellence/diabetes/

. What type insulin do you use? Lispro or NovoRapid or other?

Novolog

. "Diabetes camp which is free and sponsored by the local hospital"
What hospital exactly?
Lehigh Valley Hospital (25th in nation for diabetes)
www.lvh.org

http://www.lvh.org/cwo/Services__Specialties/Centers_of_Excellence/index.php?id=13&id2=23&id3=406&page_id=1002

. How long did the process take? One week? Two?

3 weeks

. What's YOUR opinion about using an OmniPod for a 3 year old nephew whose cusin is alive only when he is between 90 and 130?

We love the omnipod, it certainly is better for us over a traditional pump with tubing, but I wouldnt want to speculate about it's use on someone so young. the pods are small, but might be too big for a 3 y/o you really need to see one to decide.

"we are contemplating medical visa to Diabetes Mecca (Joslin clinic in Boston"

We prefer Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center.

http://nbdiabetes.org/





Congatulations, Mmmm... from the buttom of my heart,
So exhilirating. Your good news made my day. I'm jealous too and currently experiencing a sever case of device envy. Nice job, dad, and good choice. I'll knock on wood. Keep us updated. I'm 100% with OmniPod. And have spent quite a time reading about it. This no-tube idea is quite something -beyond doubt. It's so discreet. It's fantabulous. Very cool indeed. You're now surfing on the wave of future pumps.
I'm Payam. My beloved 3 year old nephew was discovered to be diabetic type 1 aroud 20 days ago. My sorrow is beyond belief. After spending some time on the web we decided that CSII therapy is a must and OmniPod is THE choice. Turns out OmniPod is not yet? distributed outside the States. FDA has approved it just for inside the States. And naturally a prescription is needed. Thing is, we are living in Iran and we are contemplating medical visa to Diabetes Mecca (Joslin clinic in Boston) in search of better care and specifically OmniPod. I'm so down I can barely breathe. Let me know your email (mine is payam7777777@hotmail.com) I'm gonna need to keep in touch with people like you.


. Here's another mom using OmniGodSend i should say for her litte child:
http://community.diabetes.org/n/pfx/forum.aspx?nav=messages&tsn=1&tid=4359&webtag=adaparents

. Upload some photos man.

. They say the 'embedded' glucometer uses FreeStyle test strips. Does it work with BD's .3uL lancet device With the 33G lancets?

. Where did you switch to this pump? Which clinic?

. What type insulin do you use? Lispro or NovoRapid or other?

. "Diabetes camp which is free and sponsored by the local hospital"
What hospital exactly?

. How long did the process take? One week? Two?

. What's YOUR opinion about using an OmniPod for a 3 year old nephew whose cusin is alive only when he is between 90 and 130?

. Here's the list of my links on OmniPod.
Brand New OmniPod User
http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showthread.php?t=1065

New Products: OmniPod(tm)Insulin Management System
http://www.diabetesincontrol.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=2664

A forum thread on OmniPod
http://community.diabetes.org/n/pfx/forum.aspx?nav=messages&tsn=1&tid=4359&webtag=adaparents

On OmniPod
http://www.diabetesincontrol.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=2680

Pump Without Tubing Coming Soon
http://www.diabetesmine.com/2005/07/pump_without_tu.html

OmniPoding
http://www.diabetesmine.com/2005/11/omnipoding.html

Close Encounter: an OmniPod User
http://www.diabetesmine.com/2005/11/close_encounter.html

OmniPod is Off and Pumping!
http://www.thediabetesblog.com/2005/12/06/omnipod-is-off-and-pumping/

More on the Omnipod
http://www.kweaver.org/archives/2005/07/more_on_the_omn.html

Omnipod Specs
http://www.kweaver.org/archives/2005/05/omnipod_specs.html

The Allure of "Omnipod"...at least on film
http://insulinpumpdemystified.blogspot.com/2006/05/allure-of-omnipodat-least-on-film.html

The Omnipodô Integrated Insulin Delivery and Glucose Monitoring System
http://www.medgadget.com/archives/2005/07/the_omnipod_int.html

Complete Services for a Successful Pump Experience
http://www.integrateddiabetes.com/pump_c.shtml

Create an insulin pump alternative that is discrete and easy-to-use
http://www.reedlink.com/SingleArticle~ContentId~59603~pub~MD.html

Insulet Corporation
http://www.lcpartners.com/enews/newsletter/2006-03_newsletter/index_email.html#company_2

Take care.

Nicisan
08-17-2006, 07:32 AM
Hi,

I am living in the Uk and have just seen the site for omnipod and I am very interested. It certainly sounds like your son is enjoying the freedom it gives him :) . I know it is not available in the UK yet but I am hoping that it will be one day and was just curious about the disposable unit. Is it truely disposable or do you have to recycle them? I only ask as I think the rules about disposal of needles and such is different for you than in the Uk.

Thanks

Seans Dad
08-17-2006, 10:13 AM
Hello -

The pod itself is a self-contained unit. The needle is pulled back into the pod never to be seen again. We dispose of it in the normal household trash.

Seans Dad
08-18-2006, 10:50 AM
Wow!! It appears that a lot of people want to know about the omnipod, it appears to me this is the most viewed thread in the insulin pump forum. Woo-hoo!!!!!
Now if someone can tell me how to post pictures, I can post some of Sean and his omnipod!

payam7777777
08-18-2006, 01:01 PM
. You got on OmniPod in Lehigh Vally Hospital(http://www.lvh.org/services/excellence/diabetes/)
and suggested Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center(http://nbdiabetes.org/)

i'm a liittle confused.

1. Do they do OmniPod in NaomiBerrie too?

2. Why did you do it in LehighVally, then? I don't want to be nosy or something but could you please shed some more light on that?

Happy Pumping.

payam7777777
08-18-2006, 01:05 PM
Find some space on the www to upload the digital-ized photos and then put the links/urls to that photos in your post.

rmccully2000
08-18-2006, 01:23 PM
Wow!! It appears that a lot of people want to know about the omnipod, it appears to me this is the most viewed thread in the insulin pump forum. Woo-hoo!!!!!
Now if someone can tell me how to post pictures, I can post some of Sean and his omnipod!

I hope you don't mind but I have been steering people from other forums who are asking about Omnipod to your posts. Since it's so new for children, you are one of the first to detail you're experience online. It seems like there is a lot of speculation and misinformation out there since Insulet is not actively marketing their product yet.

Can't wait to see the pictures :) Thanks again for sharing.
Becky
Mom to Mason, 6 dx 11/05

Seans Dad
08-18-2006, 02:34 PM
1. Do they do OmniPod in NaomiBerrie too?

I'm not sure, I would be pretty positive they do.

2. Why did you do it in LehighVally, then? I don't want to be nosy or something but could you please shed some more light on that?

We were more impressed with the research going on and the people at Naomi than at Joslin. We researched many facilities when Sean was first diagnosed. When we discovered LVH was 25th in U.S. News hospital rankings for Hormonal disorders that settled it for us. Plus, Lehigh Valley Hospital is 10 minutes from our home and Naomi is 2 hours away.


. You got on OmniPod in Lehigh Vally Hospital(http://www.lvh.org/services/excellence/diabetes/)
and suggested Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center(http://nbdiabetes.org/)

i'm a liittle confused.

1. Do they do OmniPod in NaomiBerrie too?

2. Why did you do it in LehighVally, then? I don't want to be nosy or something but could you please shed some more light on that?

Happy Pumping.

Seans Dad
08-18-2006, 02:35 PM
I hope you don't mind but I have been steering people from other forums who are asking about Omnipod to your posts. Since it's so new for children, you are one of the first to detail you're experience online. It seems like there is a lot of speculation and misinformation out there since Insulet is not actively marketing their product yet.

Can't wait to see the pictures :) Thanks again for sharing.
Becky
Mom to Mason, 6 dx 11/05

No, I think it's awesome. I will work on getting pictures up this weekend.

payam7777777
08-18-2006, 05:26 PM
Joslin's said to be Mecca of diabetes care. i made half a dozen phone calls to them today, i'm not very impressed.

Seans Dad
08-21-2006, 01:28 PM
I am posting my comments here from another thread:

"First of all there are no vibrating alarms, only audible alarms."

On a traditional pump I don't know what the alarm features are, but the only alarm we have heard on the pod to date is a beep. The beep is about the same tone and volume as a cell phone message beep. Not really the blaring screaming alarm that has been referred to.

"Secondly, one cannot prefill a pod to carry around with them as a spare."

That is true, but you can carry the insulin and spare pod in the same case as the pod controller and have holders built in for this. I am curious as to what you prefill and carry around with a traditional pump?
You are correct the Pod only carries 200 units onboard.

"BTW, while the rep told us insertion is virtually painless, one friend of mine told me her son found the insertion painful, and he's been a pumper for many years."

No more painful than taking a needle for injections, according to my son.

Now a commentary:

Someone had noted that some on these boards have been very critical of the omnipod, and that is true. I can tell you that 2 people have emailed me from here and have insinuated that I work for the Insulet Corporation, I wish that was true, but it isn't.
The Omnipod is not available across the U.S., they will not send supplies to people outside the coverage area. They are only serving, from what I gather the east coast at the present time. People on the forum have said that supply availability is a problem. We received our omnipod system 10 days after insulet received the paperwork. We received a 3 month supply of pods and test strips when we received the system.

Please don't condem others because they are excited about a new technology. A product that in my opinion is cutting edge for diabetes care. Insulet is a small company that although is in business to make money is also trying to advance diabetes care.




I was enthusiastic about the OmniPod for my son, and had a rep come to our pump support group to show us the features etc. Certain features need to be implemented before my son would be willing to wear it.

First of all there are no vibrating alarms, only audible alarms. As a young adult, a blaring screaming alarm is not going to be acceptable to him when he's with other people. Secondly, one cannot prefill a pod to carry around with them as a spare. Third, each pod does not hold enough insulin for my son. (Right now his pump has vibrating alarms and he can carry prefilled cartridges that hold 300 units, with him for his pump.)

BTW, while the rep told us insertion is virtually painless, one friend of mine told me her son found the insertion painful, and he's been a pumper for many years. The rep did not allow any of us to try an insertion although I would have been willing.

I look forward to newer features in the next generation of their pump.

rmccully2000
08-21-2006, 04:49 PM
Thanks Sean's Dad. I know others have felt the same way and won't post on other sites but please don't leave us (I swear I don't work for the company either. I'm just also excited about a new option for insulin delivery).

I know most everyone just wants to help and I really appreciate it. :) I think some get a little sensitive having to frequently justify their choice of the Omnipod or wanting to try the Omnipod (like me). The negativity is shying some people away who could help others and it gets a little frustrating; not just here but on other forums too so for me it's cumulative :)

I think it's important for new pod users and pump shoppers to have experienced users to turn to for tips, pointers and real life experience. Just like these forums have provided numerous tips and work arounds for situations that arise with the other pumps and various infusion sets. For pump shoppers, the best source is someone who is using the system because others may not have the most accurate information.

I don't want to offend anyone because this is such a great place, I'm just trying to protect this valuable source of information (for me anyways ;)) that Sean's Dad is willing to offer. Especially, if we trial the pod and like it enough to use it, then I would like to come here and offer help to others also!

Thanks!
Becky
Mom to Mason 6
dx 11/05

Ellen
08-21-2006, 05:36 PM
Another huge pro for the OmniPod is there's no risk of a child giving him/herself an accidental overdose of insulin provided the child has no access to the PDA. Is there a lock out feature on the PDA so a teacher or other adult would have to have to insert a series of steps or codes in order to give the child a bolus?

Seans Dad
08-22-2006, 08:00 PM
If I remember correctly our OmniPod instructor told us that you can password protect the PDA. Since Sean is 13 we didn't really pay much attention to it.

Seans Dad
08-30-2006, 01:43 AM
We are a little more than a month into using the omnipod and we are very happy overall. We just spent 5 days at our family cabin in the mountains and had 2 problems with the pod.

1) While playing in a boxing moon bounce, Sean startled wrestling with a kid who grabbed him around the waist. Sean pulled back, kid didn't let go, and you guessed it, off came the pod.

2) I assume we measured wrong and didn't put in the min amount of insulin into the pod. The pod didn't prime right and wasted a pod.

Make sure you put in enough insulin or you will waste a pod.

On a more positive note:
Sean ate cake, ice cream, had regular soda, pizza, potato chips and each time just punched in the carbs into his pda and went back to playing.

I am amazed at how well the pod does stay on and the cannula remains inserted, it really is amazing.
Although I think I made this suggestion before (the advice we didn't follow :cwds: ) If you have the pod on and will be wrestling or doing any contact sports or play, wrap the area first in an ace bandadge!

Seans Dad
08-30-2006, 01:47 AM
By the way.....over a 1,000 views.....wow, i'm impressed....maybe I can talk Admin into making this a pinned thread!!:) :D

snowhite
08-30-2006, 08:34 PM
I'm an adult Omnipod user and have been since May. I've only had one pod that I initially didn't fill with the minimum amount of insulin. I was able to add more to it and it worked fine. The thing to do is keep the PDA close to the pod while you fill it and listen for a beep once it's filled. You should hear the beep before priming it. If you don't hear the beep add additional insulin and listen for the beep. I've found this to work well and you don't waste a pod. I try to only add the mimimum amount of insulin since I don't require even the minimum amount to cover me for 3 days. I've only had one pod to come lose, not completely unattached but it was on it's 3rd day and I had been in a pool. Good luck and thank you for giving so much info to others interested in the Omnipod.

Seans Dad
08-31-2006, 10:02 AM
I'm an adult Omnipod user and have been since May. I've only had one pod that I initially didn't fill with the minimum amount of insulin. I was able to add more to it and it worked fine. The thing to do is keep the PDA close to the pod while you fill it and listen for a beep once it's filled. You should hear the beep before priming it. If you don't hear the beep add additional insulin and listen for the beep. I've found this to work well and you don't waste a pod. I try to only add the mimimum amount of insulin since I don't require even the minimum amount to cover me for 3 days. I've only had one pod to come lose, not completely unattached but it was on it's 3rd day and I had been in a pool. Good luck and thank you for giving so much info to others interested in the Omnipod.

Awesome, thanks for the info. Did you buy an extra PDM?

payam7777777
08-31-2006, 07:21 PM
http://www.diabeteshealth.com/read,1048,4779.html

snowhite
09-02-2006, 10:01 AM
No I didn't purchase an extra PDM.

Connie(BC)Type 1
09-03-2006, 04:05 PM
Thank you Sean's Dad, I understand what you mean about people condemming wihtout trying. I'm trialing the New Roche/Disitronic Spirit pump, and love it, people don't was to hear it because ove the separate PDA, which I find much more useful then inputting into the pump and trying to read! Just MHO
I wish the Omni Pod was available in Canada to try as well!

Seans Dad
09-07-2006, 11:47 AM
Thank you Sean's Dad, I understand what you mean about people condemming wihtout trying. I'm trialing the New Roche/Disitronic Spirit pump, and love it, people don't was to hear it because ove the separate PDA, which I find much more useful then inputting into the pump and trying to read! Just MHO
I wish the Omni Pod was available in Canada to try as well!

I'm sure it will be one day. How is your trial going with this pump?

payam7777777
09-07-2006, 07:16 PM
Dad,

We're waiting for photos.

HappyPumping!

Seans Dad
09-09-2006, 08:00 AM
http://img222.imageshack.us/img222/1636/p1010827bm7.th.jpg (http://img222.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1010827bm7.jpg)

Seans Dad
09-09-2006, 08:03 AM
http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/7522/p1010828es1.th.jpg (http://img215.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1010828es1.jpg)

Seans Dad
09-09-2006, 08:06 AM
This is where we put Sean when he forgets to check his blood. :eek: :p :)

http://img209.imageshack.us/img209/3663/p1010544yq4.th.jpg (http://img209.imageshack.us/my.php?image=p1010544yq4.jpg)

rmccully2000
09-09-2006, 09:59 AM
What a handsome young man you have there! It looks like you know how to keep him in line LOL!

So are you guys past the 30 day trial period? Have you decided to continue using this system?

Thanks!
Becky

Seans Dad
09-09-2006, 02:23 PM
What a handsome young man you have there! It looks like you know how to keep him in line LOL!

So are you guys past the 30 day trial period? Have you decided to continue using this system?

Thanks!
Becky
Thanks!!
Yes, we are almost at 60 days and will continue to use the system.

I have also heard that the FreeStyle Navigator Continuous Glucose Monitoring System will be able to link to the Omnipod system once it passes FDA approval.

payam7777777
09-09-2006, 05:23 PM
There is a filter somewhere than doesnt let me view the pictures.
They filter whatever they want in Iran.
Can somebody kindly email me the photos?
payam7777777@hotmail.com

rmccully2000
09-09-2006, 08:58 PM
Payam,

I downloaded the pictures and emailed them to you. My email address is my CWD username at yahoo.com.

Sean's Dad,

Did the people at Insulet mention Navigator to you? Do you know if the PDM currently has the hardware to receive data from Navigator once it's approved or will this feature come with the next generation PDM?

And speaking on this topic, how are they going to handle PDM software upgrades? Will you download it with a cable or do you have to send the PDM in or get a new PDM? Will it cost money?

Oh, thought of another question too :) Are you able to download the PDM data to a PC? If so, what is the PC software like? Does it have charts and graphs to analyze blood sugars, carbs, and insulin doses?

Thanks again for all the info.
Becky

Connie(BC)Type 1
09-10-2006, 01:52 AM
Trial was geat, I'm commited to buying it and have gotten a lot of freebies with it! They're even giving me a spare pump for emergencies! It has all the bells and whistles of the Cozmo and is much easier to use. That alarm is MUCH better then the cozmo! After all the hype on the cozmo I was very prepared to like it, was extremely dissappointed with it.

thebestnest5
09-12-2006, 04:11 PM
Thank you for sharing. We are just looking into the pump for our 7 year old daughter dx'd in May.

God Bless,

<><
Shere

Ellen
09-13-2006, 10:31 AM
[I have also heard that the FreeStyle Navigator Continuous Glucose Monitoring System will be able to link to the Omnipod system once it passes FDA approval.[/quote]

Did you hear this from Abbott?

payam7777777
09-15-2006, 04:33 AM
OmniPod Started
http://community.diabetes.org/n/pfx/forum.aspx?nav=messages&tsn=17&tid=5400&webtag=adaparents

Mom_n_nurse
09-24-2006, 04:35 PM
That's so great that everything is going good with the Omni pump! I was digging around online when I found the website a few months ago. I saved the site because I thought my daughter would like the fact that it didn't have all the tubes to deal with. We live in Texas and I'm not sure if it's available here. We go back to Texas Children's on Nov 16th for the pump class. We are doing the pens now. I was wondering if you can really see the pod under clothes. My daughter is in 6th grade and it's really important to fit in right now. Good luck with the football!

Seans Dad
09-26-2006, 05:10 PM
No real updates to provide...........other than we still love the pod. We did get a free box of pods from Insulet which was nice. They sent them to us to cover the two that came off early and 1 that failed. We had problems with 3 or 4 pods and they sent us a box of 10! wooo-hoo!!

Seans Dad
09-26-2006, 05:15 PM
If you have any questions about the pod, please feel free to email me.

Seans Dad
10-06-2006, 09:48 PM
Does anybody else use the "pod"?

Momof4gr8kids
10-08-2006, 02:08 PM
I think the omni pod sounds neat! I am glad you posted about this to clear up some misconceptions. We don't have the omni pod as an option yet for a few reasons, but we can always consider it in the future when it opens up to the whole U.S., and our insurance decides to cover it. My DH wants to try it out, but we live in Idaho. It looks alot more cost effective then the others. Keep us posted on how it goes. Thanks for sharing with us!
Jamie

Seans Dad
10-10-2006, 12:14 AM
That's so great that everything is going good with the Omni pump! I was digging around online when I found the website a few months ago. I saved the site because I thought my daughter would like the fact that it didn't have all the tubes to deal with. We live in Texas and I'm not sure if it's available here. We go back to Texas Children's on Nov 16th for the pump class. We are doing the pens now. I was wondering if you can really see the pod under clothes. My daughter is in 6th grade and it's really important to fit in right now. Good luck with the football!
I'm sorry I didn't see this earlier..........if she wears it on her stomach and wears tight shirts, you will see it. The only way you won't see it is if she wears baggy clothes anything form fitting will show the pod. She can put it on the small of her back and it would help conceal it more.

Heather.M
10-10-2006, 04:03 PM
Hi,

We have finally come to a decision about a pump for our 6 year old daughter Katherine. The Omnipod. Thanks- Seans Dad for keeping us up to date how everything is going. Any more details you would like to share?


Not to get off the subject but...

I just got off the phone with our CDE and she said that my daughter has never had the C-Peptide test. She said that some insurance co.'s won't approve the pump until this test is done because it actually determines if you are a type 1 or 2. I asked her to look back in the records to see if she had this test and she just missed so I am waiting for a call back. So what do I do, research more on the internet and find this site :

http://www.diabetescasestudy.com/

Any thoughts..... Heather, Mom of Katherine 6 diag. 7/2005

Seans Dad
10-10-2006, 05:02 PM
Hi,

We have finally come to a decision about a pump for our 6 year old daughter Katherine. The Omnipod. Thanks- Seans Dad for keeping us up to date how everything is going. Any more details you would like to share?


Not to get off the subject but...

I just got off the phone with our CDE and she said that my daughter has never had the C-Peptide test. She said that some insurance co.'s won't approve the pump until this test is done because it actually determines if you are a type 1 or 2. I asked her to look back in the records to see if she had this test and she just missed so I am waiting for a call back. So what do I do, research more on the internet and find this site :

http://www.diabetescasestudy.com/

Any thoughts..... Heather, Mom of Katherine 6 diag. 7/2005

As far as I know Sean has never had a C-Peptide test. My advice is to call your insurance co and see if they require it.

My only advice is to track your remaining pods. You will get a case of 4 boxes, 1 box is an emergency box. The 3 boxes need to last 90 days, your insurance company won't cover anymore (probably). However, if for some reason you are replacing them faster thean every 3 days or they come off, call Insulet Corp. They will send you more pods for free. They are an awesome company!

Heather.M
10-20-2006, 02:35 PM
Hi

How is Sean doing on his Omnipod? Does he have a special "pack" that he puts the PDM in? Keep us updated when you can. Are the 1000 foods that are programed in helpful?

Thanks,

Mom of Katherine, 6 diagnosed 7/2005
Will start on Omnipod the Day after Thanksgiving!

Any other Omnipod users that would like to share...

payam7777777
10-20-2006, 07:33 PM
What matters is not 'how cool a pump is' but how it helps reduce A1C.
- John Walsh

Alright, I DO believe in OmniPod. I DO. (Even if it increases A1C)
Dad,
Just in order to remove any doubt Could you let us have some new A1C?

TaeandTiff
10-21-2006, 10:52 AM
I am in the process of making a decin on pumps. I am not sure this would be a good idea for ayden because he is only 3. Are the bolus small like the animus, and are as user friendly as cozmore. I also see alot out there about the minimed. His doc told me about all 3 except for the omnipod. Will this easily come off a small 3 yr old frame? I like the fact that there are no tubes, but the main question is A1c. How has Sean's been?
Yhou should be a forum leader or something.:)
thanks

Kara L
10-26-2006, 04:07 PM
I too have a 3 year old diagnosed in 7/06. I love the sound of the Omnipod but am also concerned that it will be too big on a 3 year old. On Saturday I will be meeting with a family that has a 6 year old currently wearing the Omnipod. I will report back as to how it appears on a child that age. Anyone out there with a child under 6 wearing the Omnipod....?

Jeff
10-26-2006, 04:20 PM
Please take pictures!

payam7777777
10-28-2006, 02:04 AM
You're very lucky you have access to OmniPod. Fnankly speaking i envy you. I've read a lot about OmniPod. I did ~whatever i could do to get this great product for my little nephew. (We're in Iran) OmniPod said it's impossible. Not just because of the fact that it's not yet even available in everywhere in the states, but because of the need for 'face-to-face' training and support. *sigh* i said we'd travel to the states to get the training. They said even if we do that they wouldnt let us have OmniPod because of support and 'consumables' and pods and whatnot. Ali has a 512 right now, but OmniPod is something else. I do respect OmniPod's policy and ethics of course, but there should be a way we could benefit from this product.

Kara L
10-30-2006, 01:50 PM
Not much to report other than that the 6 year old and family are very happy with the omnipod. I saw the pods - very small but thicker in width than I had pictured it. Looks easy to carry around the individually packaged extra pods. Apparently, you do need a somewhat flat surface to place the pods. I learned that there is a family with a 2 year old with an omnipod. I will be very interested to hear about that and will report back if anyone is interested. It would be great if Omnipod could make an even smaller version for kids!

thebestnest5
10-30-2006, 02:56 PM
It would be great if Omnipod could make an even smaller version for kids!


I have wondered that as well. I think it would be so nice if Omnipod could make a smaller pod for younger kids. We should e-mail them and let them know that we would be interested. I am sure that there are more people who would be interested in a smaller pod for younger children. Who knows? Maybe if Omnipod receives enough requests....:cwds: :)

Seans Dad
10-30-2006, 04:49 PM
Hi everyone. October has been a crazy month for us. I will get some pictures up tonight or tomorrow and answer as many of your questions as possible. Sorry for the delay, but I have not had any free time the past three weeks!:eek:

payam7777777
10-31-2006, 07:43 AM
Can anybody think of a way for me to buy OmniPod for my little nephew? As you may know we are in iran and because of OmniPod's policy in covering those areas where full support is available (eastern US) i couldnt convince them to sell us this great product. Their policy is respectable of coursse but there should be a way... making an exception maybe. There also is the political issues and posible future sanctions. But still i know all these problems can be solved or bypassed. i just dont know how/who to convince that we ARE able to cope with managing a pump. We do have the say problem-solving attitude needed to do that and the supplies... we can provide them ahead of time so that if anything interruptions the constant supply of pods and whatnot we dont face a problem. We also have our MM pump which will be used just in case. I just dont know who to talk to. I dont know why on earth they seem not willing to listen to us! During the very 1st days of our diagnosis and even up until now pretty much everybody in the states have been so considerate, but i just cant figure out why we cant have OmniPod.
Can any body kindly think of any idea?

Tell me who to talk to...

If it doesnt work then tell me who to bribe (just kidding)...

If it doesnt work then tell me who to kill (not kidding)!

Humor aside, it will really really be a GREAT relief for our family to have OmniPod, and like i said we are ready, able and willing to manage having a pump far away from 'face to face' customer support. We can afford to have it and we want to have it. Why o why should we not be able to have it!?

Please, and sincerely speaking, dont tell me OmniPod is not suitable for you for this and for that. Dont tell me how hard it will be to get enough pods later or how bigger than you thoughts the pods actually are and things like that. Let me worry about that part. I'm sorry o be a little awkward but i'm speaking really honestly. If you really want to help (i know you do) then let's try to think of some way to get OmniPod. I've already contacted them. They said no way and their main concerns were:
- Company's policy (covering where face to face support is available)
- Political issues
- We may not be... you know... educated enough for the pump.

I really really dont know what else to do.
It shouldnt be so hard.
It shouldnt.



انما اشکوا بثی و حزنی الی الله

Seans Dad
10-31-2006, 06:41 PM
Some pictures for you

http://img438.imageshack.us/slideshow/player.php?id=img438/4059/1162338473s5t.smil

Seans Dad
10-31-2006, 07:00 PM
Hi

How is Sean doing on his Omnipod? Does he have a special "pack" that he puts the PDM in? Keep us updated when you can. Are the 1000 foods that are programed in helpful?

Thanks,

Mom of Katherine, 6 diagnosed 7/2005
Will start on Omnipod the Day after Thanksgiving!

Any other Omnipod users that would like to share...

He is doing very well. Omnipod sends you a case that carries the PDM, test strips, insulin and lancets. They also send you a notebook that is padded that you can carry all of your supplies in for 2 weeks. Ideal for going on vacation.

We have used the food diary a few times, but one of us already usually knows the carbs in something. We use the carb book more often.

Seans Dad
10-31-2006, 07:03 PM
What matters is not 'how cool a pump is' but how it helps reduce A1C.
- John Walsh

Alright, I DO believe in OmniPod. I DO. (Even if it increases A1C)
Dad,
Just in order to remove any doubt Could you let us have some new A1C?

His last A1C was in June, he went on the pod in July. At that time his A1C was 6.5 I believe. When he has his next one I will post it here. That will be Dec. / Jan

Seans Dad
10-31-2006, 07:09 PM
I am in the process of making a decin on pumps. I am not sure this would be a good idea for ayden because he is only 3. Are the bolus small like the animus, and are as user friendly as cozmore. I also see alot out there about the minimed. His doc told me about all 3 except for the omnipod. Will this easily come off a small 3 yr old frame? I like the fact that there are no tubes, but the main question is A1c. How has Sean's been?
Yhou should be a forum leader or something.:)
thanks

I am sorry it took so long to reply. Where do you live? The pump might not be available yet.

Bolus Increments: 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 units
Basal Increments and Maximum: 0.05 U/hr increments, up to 30 U/hr

His last A1C was in June, he started his pump in July. When he has his next test I will posts the results here.

Before he went on the pump his glucose was all over the place. Since he has been on the pod he rarely goes high or low and when he does it is usually caused by not counting carbs right.

Seans Dad
10-31-2006, 07:12 PM
Please take pictures!

Just posted some

Seans Dad
10-31-2006, 07:15 PM
Not much to report other than that the 6 year old and family are very happy with the omnipod. I saw the pods - very small but thicker in width than I had pictured it. Looks easy to carry around the individually packaged extra pods. Apparently, you do need a somewhat flat surface to place the pods. I learned that there is a family with a 2 year old with an omnipod. I will be very interested to hear about that and will report back if anyone is interested. It would be great if Omnipod could make an even smaller version for kids!

In talking to people at Insulet, I believe a smaller version for little kids is down the road. Right now the focus is rolling the product out to the rest of the U.S.A. Right now they cover the eastern seaboard and I believe are starting to move out to the mid-west.

Seans Dad
10-31-2006, 07:17 PM
I have wondered that as well. I think it would be so nice if Omnipod could make a smaller pod for younger kids. We should e-mail them and let them know that we would be interested. I am sure that there are more people who would be interested in a smaller pod for younger children. Who knows? Maybe if Omnipod receives enough requests....:cwds: :)

They have heard the call for a smaller for version. But I think the bigger call is to get the product they have out into the mid-west and west.

Seans Dad
10-31-2006, 07:19 PM
Can anybody think of a way for me to buy OmniPod for my little nephew? As you may know we are in iran and because of OmniPod's policy in covering those areas where full support is available (eastern US) i couldnt convince them to sell us this great product. Their policy is respectable of coursse but there should be a way... making an exception maybe. There also is the political issues and posible future sanctions. But still i know all these problems can be solved or bypassed. i just dont know how/who to convince that we ARE able to cope with managing a pump. We do have the say problem-solving attitude needed to do that and the supplies... we can provide them ahead of time so that if anything interruptions the constant supply of pods and whatnot we dont face a problem. We also have our MM pump which will be used just in case. I just dont know who to talk to. I dont know why on earth they seem not willing to listen to us! During the very 1st days of our diagnosis and even up until now pretty much everybody in the states have been so considerate, but i just cant figure out why we cant have OmniPod.
Can any body kindly think of any idea?

Tell me who to talk to...

If it doesnt work then tell me who to bribe (just kidding)...

If it doesnt work then tell me who to kill (not kidding)!

Humor aside, it will really really be a GREAT relief for our family to have OmniPod, and like i said we are ready, able and willing to manage having a pump far away from 'face to face' customer support. We can afford to have it and we want to have it. Why o why should we not be able to have it!?

Please, and sincerely speaking, dont tell me OmniPod is not suitable for you for this and for that. Dont tell me how hard it will be to get enough pods later or how bigger than you thoughts the pods actually are and things like that. Let me worry about that part. I'm sorry o be a little awkward but i'm speaking really honestly. If you really want to help (i know you do) then let's try to think of some way to get OmniPod. I've already contacted them. They said no way and their main concerns were:
- Company's policy (covering where face to face support is available)
- Political issues
- We may not be... you know... educated enough for the pump.

I really really dont know what else to do.
It shouldnt be so hard.
It shouldnt.



???? ????? ??? ? ???? ??? ????

Do you have any family or close friends in the states?

payam7777777
11-01-2006, 09:20 AM
Do you have any family or close friends in the states?

Well, i can think of some, how come?

payam7777777
11-01-2006, 09:22 AM
Here we go again, the stupid web-filter doesnt let me download the photos ean's Dad just uploaded. Somebody please email them to me like the previous time.

Thanks.
payam7777777@hotmail.com

Seans Dad
11-04-2006, 08:16 AM
Well, i can think of some, how come?

If they live in the current omnipod service area, maybe you could move in with them until you can get the pod and are comfortable using it.

payam7777777
11-04-2006, 11:19 AM
If they live in the current omnipod service area, maybe you could move in with them until you can get the pod and are comfortable using it.

Oh i'm glad you care.

Insulet... i talked to them... they said even if you travel to the states they wont give us one... they kinda though we're not well aware of the CSII and pumping must-knows. They were also very much influenced by this political propaganda between the two country's politicians. People in the states generally seem so influenced by the propaganda. a considerable percentage of people i'm interacting with (10-20 percent at least which is a small yet big percentage) are so scared of communicating with iran and things like that.

Ellen
11-04-2006, 12:52 PM
I don't think it has anything to do with politics whatsoever. I think it's a safety issue. They as a company likely don't feel they can properly support the patient without a presence in your country. I would not respect them as a company if they took any other stance.

Ellen
11-04-2006, 01:02 PM
Dr. Larry Deeb and the other doctors here very wisely addressed concerns re putting a child on a pump in a country without support. I think the same holds true for using a device upon which you will rely for data to manage the diabetes:

http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/dteam/2006-08/d_0d_e2q.htm
Additional comments from Dr. Larry Deeb:

I would counsel that taking a device far from support to a place where no one knows how to use it correctly is taking a huge risk, and that risk is compounded by the age of the child.

payam7777777
11-04-2006, 02:14 PM
They as a company likely don't feel they can properly support the patient without a presence in your country.

This problem is so easy to solve Ellen,
We can purchase and store one full year of pods and supplies and spare PDAs to be used just in case of an interruption in the constant flow of supplies. It's so simple.
Moreover, should there be any further problem, we could easily switch back to our 512 pump.
It's just so simple.
They can post us the pods.

payam7777777
11-04-2006, 02:24 PM
Dr. Larry Deeb and the other doctors here very wisely addressed concerns re putting a child on a pump in a country without support. I think the same holds true for using a device upon which you will rely for data to manage the diabetes:

http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/dteam/2006-08/d_0d_e2q.htm
Additional comments from Dr. Larry Deeb:

I would counsel that taking a device far from support to a place where no one knows how to use it correctly is taking a huge risk, and that risk is compounded by the age of the child.

Help team said:

"I strongly urge you and the family to first become superiorly knowledgeable about the principles behind pump therapy, namely basal-bolus insulin dosing. This can be done by insulin injections and, I think, should almost always precede going directly to a pump."

Well, we are now "superiorly knowledgeable about the principles behind pump therapy"

The help team also said:
"One must remember that the reports of successful use of pumps in children and in very little children come from places where experts have literally decades of experience and have evolved in the therapy. While they show us it is a safe and effective treatment, they, too, counsel such use is only in the context of a dedicated, educated and committed full time 24/7 team for a family.
I would never dump a pump on a family in a far away place. New diabetes is a huge trial for the family with a toddler. Much love and support from the diabetes team is essential to transfer knowledge and compassion. It is much more than the device. "

We are already using a pump. We're now adjusting basal rates and boluses. I think there is no reason to under estimate us. I just donk know how to explain it. We're doing it with 512 with not-enough support/knowledge from our pump rep and doctor and others. We're in charge and we're doing gret i believe. Why cant we do it with an OmniPod i dont understand.

Okay maybe we couldnt do it back then when we were still struggling aftershocks of diagnosyis. but now we can do it.

Momof4gr8kids
11-04-2006, 04:07 PM
I tried to copy the images, however I couldn't download them because they are in a slideshow.

We are in the U.S. and cannot get the omnipod. If you can get a visa for your nephew, and stay in the states long enough for him to get medical care here, and go through all of the training and such, maybe for a year, or so, maybe you could get the omni pod then, but you will want to make sure of moving to the right place in the states.

payam7777777
11-04-2006, 04:34 PM
I tried to copy the images, however I couldn't download them because they are in a slideshow.

We are in the U.S. and cannot get the omnipod. If you can get a visa for your nephew, and stay in the states long enough for him to get medical care here, and go through all of the training and such, maybe for a year, or so, maybe you could get the omni pod then, but you will want to make sure of moving to the right place in the states.

Thanks for the effort to post the photos.

Insulet said even if you get a medical visa (which i was gonna get) we cant give you the pump.

Momof4gr8kids
11-04-2006, 06:57 PM
I am sorry to hear that. I hope Omnipod can open up their services further in the near future. I do hope they realize if they wait to long they may loose bussiness.

Twyla
11-08-2006, 11:38 PM
Does anybody else use the "pod"?

I have been on the Omnipod for two weeks. I am 42, type 1 diagnosed 7 years ago, and have a 5 year old son who is also type 1, diagnosed 6 months ago and still on injection therapy. We are waiting to see how my trial goes before deciding for him.

I like the pump so far. Easy to use, although the menus could be better designed. I am very happy to have no tubing. My main problem is that I keep losing pods: in one case it did not glue well, another time I put it on my belly and it was hurting me (because when I bend the pod moves and the cannula pokes around inside me, which is unpleasant), and twice I have had it almost ripped off: I like to wear it on my arm and I bump into doors with it. So I am learning to leave plenty of space on each side of me when I walk through doors.

Also, I have started adding a bit of superglue around the areas where the pod is attached to the adhesive, to give it a more solid attachment. Not too much, because then it won't flex properly.

For non-podders, let me explain the above: there is a fairly large pad of gauze-like substance with adhesive that attaches to your body. If you clean yourself and put it on correctly, this will not come off. However, the pod itself is only attached to the gauze at the top/cannula area and near the bottom, in order to allow your body to flex in the pod area. In my opinion, these two attachment areas are too small, so I add a bit of superglue to extend them.

Anyway, I am very curious as to other people's experiences, particularly how you figured out the best places to wear the pod.

Best,

Pablo Alvarez (Twyla's husband)

Kirsten
11-09-2006, 12:39 PM
We are very happy with it. His pre-pod A1c was 8.4. After 3 months it was 7.2. I'm happy to answer any questions about Omnipod.

Kirsten

madde
11-09-2006, 02:36 PM
Kirsten,

I am so glad you are having success with the Omnipod.

Does it come with more than one Personal Diabetes Manager?

How will you handle the PDM when he starts school. Will you let him
carry it with him to and from school?

How often do you have to change the pod?

How does it look under the clothing?

How many units of insulin does it hold?

Where do you place the pod on the body?

Just a few questions I have been wondering about myself. I would appreciate any information you could give me.

Thanks

Kirsten
11-09-2006, 05:13 PM
Hi Madde,

There is only one PDM. It goes with him to daycare in his "diabetes" bag. It's very easy to use and the teachers at daycare are able to handle it.

We need to do a pod change every other day. Adults and older kids change every third day. We have a routine of giving him a bath every other day, doing the pod change, and then giving him a special treat.

You really don't notice it under his clothing unless you know that it's there. We rotate sites on his belly, butt, and just recently were told that he's large enough to use his legs as well.

We waste a lot of insulin. The minimum that you can load it with is 100U. Griffin uses about 12U/day. I don't know what the max is.

We carry a novopen as a back-up in case of a problem with the pod while we are out and about.

Hope this helps!

Kirsten

madde
11-09-2006, 07:46 PM
Kirsten;

Thanks for all the great information. Really appreciated.

payam7777777
11-09-2006, 08:42 PM
(because when I bend the pod moves and the cannula pokes around inside me, which is unpleasant)...
I am very curious as to other people's experiences, particularly how you figured out the best places to wear the pod.


How about... the sides... the... well the so called l-handles? there should be enough fatty tissue there, and it wont have the 'bending problems'

payam7777777
11-09-2006, 08:44 PM
We are very happy with it. His pre-pod A1c was 8.4. After 3 months it was 7.2. I'm happy to answer any questions about Omnipod.

Kirsten

And do you remember the 'normal A1C range' for the lab you did your test?

Seans Dad
11-10-2006, 05:07 PM
I have been on the Omnipod for two weeks. I am 42, type 1 diagnosed 7 years ago, and have a 5 year old son who is also type 1, diagnosed 6 months ago and still on injection therapy. We are waiting to see how my trial goes before deciding for him.

I like the pump so far. Easy to use, although the menus could be better designed. I am very happy to have no tubing. My main problem is that I keep losing pods: in one case it did not glue well, another time I put it on my belly and it was hurting me (because when I bend the pod moves and the cannula pokes around inside me, which is unpleasant), and twice I have had it almost ripped off: I like to wear it on my arm and I bump into doors with it. So I am learning to leave plenty of space on each side of me when I walk through doors.

Also, I have started adding a bit of superglue around the areas where the pod is attached to the adhesive, to give it a more solid attachment. Not too much, because then it won't flex properly.

For non-podders, let me explain the above: there is a fairly large pad of gauze-like substance with adhesive that attaches to your body. If you clean yourself and put it on correctly, this will not come off. However, the pod itself is only attached to the gauze at the top/cannula area and near the bottom, in order to allow your body to flex in the pod area. In my opinion, these two attachment areas are too small, so I add a bit of superglue to extend them.

Anyway, I am very curious as to other people's experiences, particularly how you figured out the best places to wear the pod.

Best,

Pablo Alvarez (Twyla's husband)

Try using both prep pads and IV 3000 pads, they will help it stay put better. I would imagine super glue hurts coming off.

Seans Dad
11-10-2006, 05:11 PM
Hi Madde,

There is only one PDM. It goes with him to daycare in his "diabetes" bag. It's very easy to use and the teachers at daycare are able to handle it.

We need to do a pod change every other day. Adults and older kids change every third day. We have a routine of giving him a bath every other day, doing the pod change, and then giving him a special treat.

You really don't notice it under his clothing unless you know that it's there. We rotate sites on his belly, butt, and just recently were told that he's large enough to use his legs as well.

We waste a lot of insulin. The minimum that you can load it with is 100U. Griffin uses about 12U/day. I don't know what the max is.

We carry a novopen as a back-up in case of a problem with the pod while we are out and about.

Hope this helps!

Kirsten
Hi Kirsten,
Have you run into any issues with Insulet or your insurance using a new pod every other day?

Also, instead of wasting the insulin, you can remove it from the bladder really easily.

Heather.M
11-10-2006, 07:13 PM
Hi Sean's Dad,Twyla, Kirsten and all the parents/adults Living with Diabetes,


Our daughter Katherine will start on the Omnipod the day after Thanksgiving! Her saline start was this past Wed. Thurs. AM the pod was half off. She did have a bath Wed. night, tossed and turned a lot that night and said she bumped the pod on the kitchen table in the am before breakfast. We let her pick the site- (mid central left tummy) to reactivate a new pod Thurs am and so far so good.

I gave Insulet a call Thurs am with many questions that were all answered. I also got a call from one on Omnipods CDE that does a lot of training with kids and she suggested we try Mastisol liquid or spray adhesive. It is suppose to work great with the pod or any pump. We have not tried it yet they are ordering it for us at our local pharmacy and may be here by Tues.

Here is the site:

http://www.ferndalelabs.com/inc/frameset.asp?page=professionals/mastisol.asp

Heather,

Mom of Katherine 6, diag. 7/2005, Jack 5 and Charlotte 2

Kirsten
11-10-2006, 10:34 PM
Hi Heather,

Absolutely, I recommend that you get the Mastisol. It does help, especially, if she's going to go in the water. GL!:)

Sean's Dad,

We had no problems with insurance in getting the pods for every other day changes. It's an option right on the form that Insulet has your health care provider fill out.

Even with the waste we still go through less than 2 bottles of Humalog/ month, so it's not a big deal for us. Our prescription is for 2 vials/ month. Insulet told us we could remove insulin from an unused pod that failed to prime or insert.

Kirsten

Seans Dad
01-03-2007, 05:05 PM
*bump* still loving our omnipod!

rmccully2000
01-03-2007, 06:25 PM
*bump* still loving our omnipod!

Thanks for the update!

still waiting in Texas :D

payam7777777
01-04-2007, 06:57 AM
*bump* still loving our omnipod!

Still envying!

Adinsmom
01-05-2007, 11:46 AM
What is Sean's (for Seansdad) and Griffin's (for Kirsten) TDD? What is their basal tdd?

Is there anything that you would like to tweak about the Omnipod if you had the chance?

Thanks for the information.

Kirsten
01-06-2007, 08:33 AM
Griffin's TDD ranges from 7-14 units/ day, but averages about 11 units/day. His basal is 3.5 to 4 Units/ day.

The thing that bugs me the most about the Omnipod is that you can only program 3 different carb ratios. Ideally, Griffin would have 5 different carb ratios over the course of the day. I compensate for this by adjusting his basal around morning snack and afternoon snack. I could just do the calculations myself, but he's in daycare.

Of course, I would love the pod to be smaller, but we haven't really had many problems because of its size.

Hope this helps!:)

Kirsten

rmccully2000
01-10-2007, 02:14 PM
I just found this.. Jay Hewitt, a lawyer and ironman competitor now has Omnipod as a sponsor and he is wearing pods. Here is a quote from his blog:

http://www.jayhewitt.blogspot.com/

"Thatís why Iím excited about my new Omnipod insulin pump by Insulet. I just got it before this race and havenít had time to fine tune the basal rate, but the convenience is fantastic! No strings or tubes! Check it out! "

I'm sure if you have questions about how it handles high activity levels, lots of water and sweat in different climates, he would be a good person to ask. I doubt he would agree to wear it (even for a sponsorship) if it negatively impacted his performance.


Becky, Mom to Mason 6,

Adinsmom
01-13-2007, 03:42 PM
Kirsten and Seansdad have you noticed your child experience any pain associated with the insulin delivery.

I was just browsing another board and someone was returning their Animas because they felt the insulin delivery was too fast. Does Shawn or Griffin have any pain complaints? What about insertion pain? Do you need to use LMX-4 or any type of pain analgesic?

Thank you for being so helpful. ;)

Kirsten
01-13-2007, 07:13 PM
Griffin does complain about the "click" (his word for the pod insertion), but most of the time he barely reacts. I have put a pod on myself and I felt it was very similar to a fingerstick. We had one insertion site that caused him to wince every time that insulin was delivered. We changed the pod and everything was fine. We've used around 230 pods and only had this problem once.

Kirsten

cassandra
01-16-2007, 01:17 AM
nice. i want an omnipod... so jealous. i saw pictures of it and the pod looked small, but never really seen it, so i'm curious. i have GOT to move back to the states!!!

payam7777777
01-16-2007, 03:24 AM
i want an omnipod... so jealous.
DITTO!
DITTO!
DITTO!
.
.
.

Michaela's Mom
02-02-2007, 06:45 PM
I am just beginning to research pumps for my 6 year old daughter. The OmniPod sounds fantastic!

I have heard that other pumps that communicate remotely with meters are affected by interference from cell phone towers, microwaves, and other devices that give off strong signals. Do you experience any type of interference? If so, how does it affect the reliability of the OmniPod?

Kirsten
02-04-2007, 12:31 PM
We haven't had any problem with interference. The pod only communicates with the PDM when you are making a correction or giving a bolus.

Kirsten

KatelinsMom
02-07-2007, 05:49 PM
How does the Omnipod hold up in water? Has anyone had any problems with it while swimming or bathing? Does it stay on? I read on the omnipod's web site that it is watertight but only to 8 feet for 30 minutes. When kids are playing in the water and swimming, they are usually in the water longer than 30 minutes..like all day if they could. My daughter is fairly active teenager and enjoys swimming almost every day in the summer. What is everyone's experience with the Omnipod while swimming? Thanks!

Kirsten
02-11-2007, 09:19 AM
We haven't had any problems as long as we use Mastisol. I let him stay in the water for over 30 minutes, since he doesn't do any diving or serious underwater swimming. Mostly he's in and out of the water. We have also been to the ocean with it. The people at Insulet assured us that it had been used by many people in the ocean with no problem.

Kirsten

rmccully2000
02-11-2007, 04:11 PM
I could be wrong since it was so long ago that I asked: I believe when I asked the rep this question, the 30 minutes pertained to the water pressure of 8 ft. I think the pod can stay in the water much longer than that but it's not tested for the pressure beyond 8 ft for 30 minutes.

I would call a rep to be sure though :)
Becky, Mom to Mason

Lorraine
02-17-2007, 10:45 PM
Seansdad and Kirsten,

My 4 year old son was diagnosed with type 1 in January. My husband and I feel strongly about the Omnipod (although were initially shot down at our first clinic visit stating he was too young/small). Caleb is big for his age and because we feel so strongly about the advantages of the Omnipod, we are pushing for it. We had an empty pod on his tush for 3 days - we weren't counseled to do so, but wanted to see how Caleb could manage it. It went really well except for removal - that was a bit of an ouch. I see in the thread the recommendation of iv3000 pads to cut down on skin irritation (and he has spots of redness since removal) - thanks for that tip. I am wondering if your sons find removal to be painful or if you do something special to handle it?

Another reason the clinic was less than encouraging about any kind of pump now was because of his current dose - 2 units of NPH per day. But based upon the small dosing of the Omnipod and the spikes in his sugar levels, I am anxious and don't want to wait. I see in another string mention of high spikes after breakfast - that's totally Caleb and drives me nuts!

Thanks for all the sharing you have done to date. I hope to be one of the experienced ones soon.

Lorraine

Kirsten
02-18-2007, 06:15 AM
Lorraine,

I don't think that your son would be physically too small for the Omnipod. Griffin started on it at age 2.5, so a large 4 year old is definitely not too small. The small insulin usage will be tricky (although that might change before you actually start pumping). The Omnipod will not let you program a basal lower than .05/hour. With such a small daily dose there may be times of the day when you need to suspend the basal. While the Omnipod does allow you to suspend the basal, it won't let you program a regular time to suspend the insulin. When insulin is suspended the pod beeps every 15 minutes to remind you that it is suspended and even when the suspension is programmed to end it will not start again until you physically push the buttons. This is problematic when you want to suspend insulin for a few hours overnight. When we started the omnipod Griffin's TDD was about 7 units/day and we didn't have any problems with the basals. While I'm sure that the Omnipod is a viable option for you. You should be aware of the extra work you'll probably have to do until his TDD goes up.

As far as the removal goes, we always give Griffin a warm soapy bath before pod change. Removal is a breeze then. If we have to do a pod change without a bath, we use detachol, a gentle skin adhesive remover.

GL!

Kirsten

Lorraine
02-18-2007, 08:58 PM
Thanks Kirsten for your input. I'm surprised that the bath works - I thought you were supposed to be able to bathe with it so assumed a bath wouldn't help, but it's good to know that it does.

I thought I read somewhere that changing the pod in the evening wasn't the best idea bc you have to test it's functionality a few hours later which could disturb sleep. Maybe this was regarding another pump and I'm getting them mixed up. Have you had any issues with that?

Kind regards, Lorraine

Kirsten
02-19-2007, 07:11 AM
Hi Lorraine,

The hot soapy bath will make the pod easy to remove, but if you don't try to remove it, it will stay on and will be fully secure when dry again. We don't have a choice about doing evening pod changes, since we both work full time. We always check him at 10pm and 2am anyway, so we haven't had a problem.

Kirsten

Lorraine
02-19-2007, 07:45 PM
Kirsten - doing it right after the bath makes perfect sense. I'm so glad to know that it works and there are other options as well (detachol) bc I didn't want that to be a deal-breaker with everything else the Omnipod has to offer.

We have a vacation coming up in April, but hope to get the ball rolling so that we can be ready with the Omnipod once his TDD goes up or once we get back.

Thank you again. It's been great knowing that there is another little man out there doing successfully with the pod because the nurse that we met with at our clinic seemed to think we were suggesting the most ludicrous idea in the world. We had already spoken to a sales rep who mentioned there was a 2 year old with one (I'm guessing this was Grffin) so we were not deterred by her reaction and stood pretty strong on the idea. So thanks to you and Griffin for setting the stage for us!!

Kirsten
02-20-2007, 12:02 PM
Lorraine,

Best of luck to you all! I'm glad you found my experiences useful!

Kirsten

Twyla
02-20-2007, 02:53 PM
I have been on the Omnipod for two weeks. I am 42, type 1 diagnosed 7 years ago, and have a 5 year old son who is also type 1, diagnosed 6 months ago and still on injection therapy. We are waiting to see how my trial goes before deciding for him.

I like the pump so far. Easy to use, although the menus could be better designed. I am very happy to have no tubing. My main problem is that I keep losing pods: in one case it did not glue well, another time I put it on my belly and it was hurting me (because when I bend the pod moves and the cannula pokes around inside me, which is unpleasant), and twice I have had it almost ripped off: I like to wear it on my arm and I bump into doors with it. So I am learning to leave plenty of space on each side of me when I walk through doors.

Also, I have started adding a bit of superglue around the areas where the pod is attached to the adhesive, to give it a more solid attachment. Not too much, because then it won't flex properly.

For non-podders, let me explain the above: there is a fairly large pad of gauze-like substance with adhesive that attaches to your body. If you clean yourself and put it on correctly, this will not come off. However, the pod itself is only attached to the gauze at the top/cannula area and near the bottom, in order to allow your body to flex in the pod area. In my opinion, these two attachment areas are too small, so I add a bit of superglue to extend them.

Anyway, I am very curious as to other people's experiences, particularly how you figured out the best places to wear the pod.

Best,

Pablo Alvarez (Twyla's husband)




Try using both prep pads and IV 3000 pads, they will help it stay put better. I would imagine super glue hurts coming off.

The superglue does not go on my skin. It goes between the pod itself and the gauze pad, in order to more securely attach the pod to the gauze pad that is stuck to it and that is the part that actually attaches to my skin. I put the drop of superglue on the pod while I am getting it ready, make sure it dries and attaches to the gauze, and only later put the pod on my skin.

If i don't do this, it is really easy for the pod to be torn off, leaving the gauze still stuck to my skin!

best

pablo (twyla's husband)

JenC
02-21-2007, 02:28 PM
Thanks - nothing beats personal experience for hearing what really works and what doesn't. Sounds like you're on to a winner!

MaggieM
03-20-2007, 10:00 AM
Someone just referred me to this post. My son (age 6) just started a different pump in January (Medtronic). I wish Omnipod was a choice I was given to research. After using "traditional" pump for a few months - tubing is definitely something I would like to do away with - Omnipod is perfect answer! My son's Dr. showed us the pod a few days ago - but didn't think insurance would cover it. I never trust a Dr. on administrative financial decisions so I pre-contacted my insurance company - they cover it. Question sis - how to get out of my current (and just recently started contract) with the other pump company?

Also - for the current pump he is on - I was taught this trick for contact sports. Purchase a football pad, cut out the shape of the pump (or in this case pod) and place it over the pod during contact sports and wrap it with ace bandage - gives an extra level of comfort of protection.

I am somewhat disappointed that my son's A1C went up after starting his current pump - I know we could experience the same result on Omnipod but so many features look so impressive. We live in NE - I want to figure out a way to switch!

Twyla
03-21-2007, 11:32 AM
Hi,

Thanks for sharing your experiences with pumping with tubes. My husband uses the Omnipod and we are probably going to start our own 6 year old on it soon. I don't know about getting out of the first contract, but I'd suggest you locate and contact your Insulet Rep. It is worth noting that the start up costs for Omnipod are considerably less than those of a tradtional pump. Mayeb you could fork over the $ for the controller and first set of pods and then ask the ins. co. to just cover supplies? They'd have to be paying for infusion sets etc. anyway.

Good luck!

Twyla

Lorraine
03-28-2007, 10:27 PM
Kirsten,

We had our endo visit today and our Omnipod request will be processed this week. Caleb is up to about 4 units a day and from our experience thusfar he seems to need .5 units to cover his breakfast of about 50 carbs and .25 units to cover his dinner of about 50 carbs. We believe the dinner to be lower bc of the NPH he gets at bf which is still in his system

That being said, our endo expressed a little concern regarding the Omnipod's insulin to carb ratio capability - most sensitive of 1 to 150 (as compared to the Cozmore of 1 to 195). I imagine pumping and using only one insulin will change things, and am of the opinion that Caleb's ratio could be .5 to 50 (like his current breakfast) or 1 to 100 which is within the Omnipod limits.

I realize our son's experiences will vary, but you are the only real-life resource I have for a toddler/preschooler on the pod, so I am very interested in your and Griffin's experience. Did you find, or have you ever found the insulin to carb ratios available in the pod to be difficult to work with?

Further, she seemed to think the correction factor limit of 1 to 300 (v. 1 to 400 of the Cozmo) to be another potential issue. 1 to 300 seems to leave plenty of room to me (currently estimating .25 for 50 points or 1 to 200), but perhaps that changes a lot with the pump. Again, curious to see if you have found the pod restrictive here.

Thank you in advance for any input. Kind regards,

Kirsten
03-29-2007, 10:53 AM
Lorraine,

When Griffin started on the Omnipod his TDD was around 7 U/ day. His insulin Sensitivity factor was 250 (and still is). The lowest IC ratio that we used was 1:35, so we were nowhere near the limits of the pod on those counts.

The biggest problem that we had was that you can only program 4 IC ratios and they cannot run through midnight. For example Griffin's current ratios are:

12a-9a 1:9
9a-4pm 1:18
4pm-8pm 1:16
8pm-midnight 1:14

This is enough ratios for us now, but when he was younger, I would have preferred to have a different ratio for each meal and each snack, so that would be 6 ratios/ day.

GL!:)

Kirsten

Kirsten
05-09-2007, 06:19 AM
bumping for those asking questions about the pod.

K

Seans Dad
05-12-2007, 10:55 AM
Hello all. After a year on the pod we have decided to go with a more traditional pump. It will probably be the Cozmo.
The reason for this is two fold, first our son now will only wear the pod on his stomach and this led to his developing some serious rashes on his stomach and two skin infections. Second, at the age of 14 and high school swim class with no t-shirt wearing allowed, he has become very self-conscious of wearing the pod on his stomach.
I can say that wearing the pod has helped his BS tremendously. He had to go back on Lantus and novolog and his bs is all over the place.
I still believe that the pod is a great product and will only get better, but our son needs to be comfortable with it and right now he isn't.
With the small size of the Cozmo and built in meter, we hope this will work better for him.
By the way, we have experienced some of the problems you have with the pod. The worst was a box of pods where it seemed every other one was a dud. However, Omnipod gave us exceptional service and replaced the pods and even gave us extras.
Hopefully we will see some of you at the expo in Orlando, Sean looks forward to trying on the pumps there.

Lizzy731
05-13-2007, 03:10 PM
Hi...I am so glad I found this thread! My daughter was diagnosed about 2 months ago and being a picky eater on the conventional 2 shot a day therapy has been hellish! She will be 3 in August.

We spoke to the diabetes educator about the onmipod and she has been very supportive although she said the most difficult thing will be getting the pod to stay on her because she is young (although she is fairly large for her age...39" tall and 36 pounds.) We start with the carb counting class next week.

I have a few questions:

1.) Since she is a picky eater, can you give her half the amount of insulin for her carb intake prior to the meal and the remainder of the "saved" amount (or a portion of it) after she is finished?

2.) I have read that the PDM does not have to stay on her for the basal insulin but needs to be in a 2 foot radius for the bolus doses. If she does not have the PDM on her for the 2 hour period that she is in school (just 2 days a week starting September...I would let the teacher hold it), how will anyone know if the basal doses stop for some reason? Is the alarm on the pod or the PDM?

3.) I am a bit confused about the "every 3 day change". Does this mean that if I change the pod Monday night, I would change it again on Thursday or Wednesday night?

4.) Would you have to give her a bolus dose for a small snack under 15 grams of carbs. Her snack at school will be small and since it is a private school because she is only 3, there is no school nurse until she is in the school system at age 4. I was wondering if I would have to train the teacher as she has no experience with insulin pumps. She would be getting her snack at 11 AM and I would be picking her up at 11:30 so if anything, I could give her the bolus then (is this possible?).

5.) Waterproof for only 30 minutes or is this only for depths of 8 feet because of the water pressure?

6.) Finally...does anyone have a child this young on the pump? Is it hard to find a site that it will stay on securely? She will be three by the time she starts pumping, I am assuming.

Thanks so much in advance!:)

Kirsten
05-13-2007, 04:29 PM
Hi...I am so glad I found this thread! My daughter was diagnosed about 2 months ago and being a picky eater on the conventional 2 shot a day therapy has been hellish! She will be 3 in August.

We spoke to the diabetes educator about the onmipod and she has been very supportive although she said the most difficult thing will be getting the pod to stay on her because she is young (although she is fairly large for her age...39" tall and 36 pounds.) We start with the carb counting class next week.

I have a few questions:

1.) Since she is a picky eater, can you give her half the amount of insulin for her carb intake prior to the meal and the remainder of the "saved" amount (or a portion of it) after she is finished?

2.) I have read that the PDM does not have to stay on her for the basal insulin but needs to be in a 2 foot radius for the bolus doses. If she does not have the PDM on her for the 2 hour period that she is in school (just 2 days a week starting September...I would let the teacher hold it), how will anyone know if the basal doses stop for some reason? Is the alarm on the pod or the PDM?

3.) I am a bit confused about the "every 3 day change". Does this mean that if I change the pod Monday night, I would change it again on Thursday or Wednesday night?

4.) Would you have to give her a bolus dose for a small snack under 15 grams of carbs. Her snack at school will be small and since it is a private school because she is only 3, there is no school nurse until she is in the school system at age 4. I was wondering if I would have to train the teacher as she has no experience with insulin pumps. She would be getting her snack at 11 AM and I would be picking her up at 11:30 so if anything, I could give her the bolus then (is this possible?).

5.) Waterproof for only 30 minutes or is this only for depths of 8 feet because of the water pressure?

6.) Finally...does anyone have a child this young on the pump? Is it hard to find a site that it will stay on securely? She will be three by the time she starts pumping, I am assuming.

Thanks so much in advance!:)

1. Yes

2. If the catheter is blocked, the pod itself will alarm. The PDM will need to be used to deactivate the pod and silence the alarm. There are some alarms that will come from the PDM, but we have never experienced one.

3. We still do a 48 hour change for Griffin and he is your daughter's age. For older kids/ adults it is a 72 hour change.

4. Griffin is in daycare fulltime. His teachers test and bolus him throughout the day. Regardless of whether the teacher gives a bolus (and I would recommend training the staff) they will still need to be trained to test BG using the PDM and to give glucagon in an emergency. But, it's up to you if you want to give insulin delayed, but that would cause Griffin to spike ~150 points.

5. We don't worry about the time limit because Griffin is rarely really swimming at any sort of depth. He has a swim lesson every week for 45 minutes and we have no problem. When we go to the beach, etc, he is in and out of the water.

6. Griffin started using the omnipod at 2.5 yo. We rotated between the belly and the upper buttocks. A year later at 3.5, we also use the lower back and the upper thigh. I definitely recommend using mastisol. It is very important that the adhesive fabric underneath the pod goes on absolutely flat and that the mastisol is completely dry before you apply the pod.

GL!

Kirsten

Lizzy731
05-13-2007, 09:38 PM
1. Yes

2. If the catheter is blocked, the pod itself will alarm. The PDM will need to be used to deactivate the pod and silence the alarm. There are some alarms that will come from the PDM, but we have never experienced one.

3. We still do a 48 hour change for Griffin and he is your daughter's age. For older kids/ adults it is a 72 hour change.

4. Griffin is in daycare fulltime. His teachers test and bolus him throughout the day. Regardless of whether the teacher gives a bolus (and I would recommend training the staff) they will still need to be trained to test BG using the PDM and to give glucagon in an emergency. But, it's up to you if you want to give insulin delayed, but that would cause Griffin to spike ~150 points.

5. We don't worry about the time limit because Griffin is rarely really swimming at any sort of depth. He has a swim lesson every week for 45 minutes and we have no problem. When we go to the beach, etc, he is in and out of the water.

6. Griffin started using the omnipod at 2.5 yo. We rotated between the belly and the upper buttocks. A year later at 3.5, we also use the lower back and the upper thigh. I definitely recommend using mastisol. It is very important that the adhesive fabric underneath the pod goes on absolutely flat and that the mastisol is completely dry before you apply the pod.

GL!

Kirsten

Thanks so much for the great information. I didn't realize that the omnipod has been around for over a year. I thought it just came out within the past 6 months. I am very encouraged reading about your experience with the pod since your child was even younger than Bethany when he started.

As for the school staff, the teacher is a type 2 so she knows how to test her bs...but I didn't know if it was completely necessary to bolus her when she eats a snack with less than 15 carbs. If I must, I will teach her how to use it but I am a little hesitant because I don't know her that well and to ask her to use a machine that could harm Bethany if she messed up leaves me a little uneasy to say the least. She has no experience with Type 1 diabetic children although she has type 2 herself.

Btw, why is it necessary to change the pod every 48 hours for a child? Or is this your personal choice? And since the pod itself will alarm when the catheter is blocked, do you give the pod to the daycare staff to hold onto to bolus him when necessary or is it on your son at all times?

Thanks again for all your answers...I appreciate it greatly!

Kirsten
05-14-2007, 05:54 AM
As for the school staff, the teacher is a type 2 so she knows how to test her bs...but I didn't know if it was completely necessary to bolus her when she eats a snack with less than 15 carbs. If I must, I will teach her how to use it but I am a little hesitant because I don't know her that well and to ask her to use a machine that could harm Bethany if she messed up leaves me a little uneasy to say the least. She has no experience with Type 1 diabetic children although she has type 2 herself.

You might consider only sending very low carb snacks to daycare if you want to avoid teaching them to bolus. Cheese is a good option. Alternatively, you can set her basal to go up around snacktime so that she gets some insulin with her snack, but I think that's somewhat risky.



Btw, why is it necessary to change the pod every 48 hours for a child? Or is this your personal choice? And since the pod itself will alarm when the catheter is blocked, do you give the pod to the daycare staff to hold onto to bolus him when necessary or is it on your son at all times?

Thanks again for all your answers...I appreciate it greatly!

As it was explained to me by our endo, kids' immune systems react more quickly to the insertion of a foreign object (the catheter) and their white cells are prone to clog the catheter. We have gone beyond 48 hours on occasion and sometimes it's fine and sometimes we get high numbers. I think that if the catheter is only partially blocked the alarm will not go off, but insulin delivery can be slowed.

Griffin's PDM is in his D bag. It is always in the same room (or outside) with him.

Kirsten

Twyla
05-14-2007, 10:15 AM
Well, this is very timely for me as our 45 day trial is up tomorrow. I'm sorry it's not working for Sean but I understand the issues. Gabriel is recently 6 and also fairly large for his age. We have not had much trouble keeping the pod on him but we have had a LOT of pod failures. My husband also uses it and he rarely has failuures so I think it's something about the size and curves of a child's body. You can do an extended bolus with the pod, the alarm is on the pod itself and Gabriel has definitely spent more than 30 minutes in the water with no problem. He loves the pod and insists he wants to keep it. But the frequent changes because of failures are a hassle and a big waste of insulin. BTW, we were advised to change it every two days on a child (my husband does 3), so our failures have not even lasted 48 hours.

I think it is definitely worth a try for your daughter-the 45 day trial makes that a no risk option. If it doesn't work you can just send it back. We were also considering letting our insurance get us a conventional pump and paying out of pocket for the pod if we decide to go back to it--start up is much less for the pod.

good luck!

Adinsmom
05-14-2007, 11:30 AM
Well, this is very timely for me as our 45 day trial is up tomorrow. I'm sorry it's not working for Sean but I understand the issues. Gabriel is recently 6 and also fairly large for his age. We have not had much trouble keeping the pod on him but we have had a LOT of pod failures. My husband also uses it and he rarely has failuures so I think it's something about the size and curves of a child's body. You can do an extended bolus with the pod, the alarm is on the pod itself and Gabriel has definitely spent more than 30 minutes in the water with no problem. He loves the pod and insists he wants to keep it. But the frequent changes because of failures are a hassle and a big waste of insulin. BTW, we were advised to change it every two days on a child (my husband does 3), so our failures have not even lasted 48 hours.

I think it is definitely worth a try for your daughter-the 45 day trial makes that a no risk option. If it doesn't work you can just send it back. We were also considering letting our insurance get us a conventional pump and paying out of pocket for the pod if we decide to go back to it--start up is much less for the pod.

good luck!

Please keep us updated on what you decide to do. :cwds: I just love the tublessness of the Omnipod and cant wait for future developments of insulin pumps without tubes. I truly think it would be so much better for Adin. For the time being we think the Minimed with cgm tied into it is what is best for our son.

Interesting idea about paying out of pocket for the Omnipod. We were on the boat yesterday talking about losing a multi-thousand dollar pump versus the Omnipod.

Lizzy731
05-15-2007, 01:12 PM
Kirsten...have you had trouble with failures too as the previous poster? I was just wondering if you have a certain technique that you could share since you seem to have success with the pod and your son is young.

Thanks again for all your help!:)

Kirsten
05-15-2007, 06:41 PM
I had more trouble in the beginning with faulty pods for various reasons. In one year we did have one whole box that all failed (after 6 failures we gave up on the box). I would say that we usually have a "pod issue" 1-2 times/month.

This is what I do.

1.Griffin has a warm soapy bath.

2. We deactivate and remove his pod.

3. Warm insulin to room temp and fill pod while he bathes.

4. Get one reluctant little boy out of his splishy splashy bath.:p

5. Dry off with a towel, choose an area for pod. Our preferred sites right now are belly and upper thigh. Butt is not working as well for us now that he is out of diapers. Spray area with Mastisol.

6. Distract kid while mastisol dries.

7. Place pod carefully on body being careful to avoid any wrinkles in the adhesive fabric. If there are any wrinkles or the mastisol is still wet when you put on the pod, you're toast.:(

8. I always place the pod in a horizontal orientation. I get better results on belly insertions when the catheter end is toward his belly button. On the butt it's better for the catheter end to point away from the crack.

9. Griffin holds his "Doggie" and howls while we press start. We howl along with him and after it clicks he stops us and says, "It was just a little pinch." Then he gets a special treat, usually a marshmallow.

Hope this helps somebody! See what you get when you ask a scientist for their "protocol"???:rolleyes: :p

GL!

Kirsten

Lizzy731
05-15-2007, 10:01 PM
Thanks so much for sharing. I know that I am going to print that out when Bethany goes on the pump!:D

Lizzy731
05-15-2007, 10:09 PM
Well, this is very timely for me as our 45 day trial is up tomorrow. I'm sorry it's not working for Sean but I understand the issues. Gabriel is recently 6 and also fairly large for his age. We have not had much trouble keeping the pod on him but we have had a LOT of pod failures. My husband also uses it and he rarely has failuures so I think it's something about the size and curves of a child's body. You can do an extended bolus with the pod, the alarm is on the pod itself and Gabriel has definitely spent more than 30 minutes in the water with no problem. He loves the pod and insists he wants to keep it. But the frequent changes because of failures are a hassle and a big waste of insulin. BTW, we were advised to change it every two days on a child (my husband does 3), so our failures have not even lasted 48 hours.

I think it is definitely worth a try for your daughter-the 45 day trial makes that a no risk option. If it doesn't work you can just send it back. We were also considering letting our insurance get us a conventional pump and paying out of pocket for the pod if we decide to go back to it--start up is much less for the pod.

good luck!

Thanks for the info...maybe Kristen's post will help you as well? My diabetes educator is sending me a pod in the mail to attach to her to see if she will at least keep it on her before the saline trial begins. Thank goodness I have great insurance that will pay 100% for the omnipod PDM and all monthly supplies...is this typical? Are people paying for their omnipods as well?

Kirsten
05-15-2007, 10:19 PM
Thanks for the info...maybe Kristen's post will help you as well? My diabetes educator is sending me a pod in the mail to attach to her to see if she will at least keep it on her before the saline trial begins. Thank goodness I have great insurance that will pay 100% for the omnipod PDM and all monthly supplies...is this typical? Are people paying for their omnipods as well?


We're covered 100% as well.

Kirsten

Lorraine
05-18-2007, 02:29 PM
Hello all. We have passed our 3 week mark on the pod and things are going well podwise - still trying to get settings fine-tuned, but I think that must be typical for pump starts.

Regarding the questions quoted below - the PDM needs to be near the pod only for a few seconds when delivering a bolus. Once the pod receives the message, the PDM can be put away and the pod will continue to deliver the bolus until it's done.

I would definitely bolus for a 15g snack. I have found sensitivity to food to be much greater on the pump than on shots with long lasting insulin. The PDM is very easy to use. With training, and overseeing a few, I think anyone can do it. Caleb's 6 year old brother does his bolus' sometimes - with no training. I am also coaching his preschool teacher.

We have had no pod failures - yet. However, we have had occasion to change the pod bc it got pulled off when pulling down pants or sliding down a slide was a recent issue. It also got clogged once from blood around the insertion and we had to change it. We try to go for 3 days - no one advised us otherwise but I think that's probably bc our endo has no experience with the pod on little ones and our trainer from Insulet did not seem to be giving us her full attention. I have not found any issues during that 3rd day yet, but do keep a close eye to see if dosing requirements seem to go up.

We have not found a need for mastisol yet. The pod seems to stay on him fine without it - just IV prep. Our trainer told us to wait for it to dry, but a rep from Insulet said that's a mistake - put the pod on while still wet. We do and that seems to work fine (so far).

Pod changes were horrific at first but they have gotten much better. I have much more confidence in what I am doing and Caleb has been going with the flow very well considering how he dreads the insertion. I relate to Kirsten's point of getting a reluctant child out of the tub. ;) I have found Caleb's reluctance to get less recently. Once it's over, everyone is quick to get back into our normal craziness and pod changes are down to about 5 minutes from start to finish.

We use the buttocks, but bc sliding was an issue, recently moved to lower back and that seems to work well - no issues with going to the bathroom is also a plus to not having it on the buttocks. Haven't tried belly yet - Caleb's reluctance - and our trainer was opposed to the leg, although didn't say why. I'm glad to know it's working on someone else about Caleb's leg. It's another place we will consider.

That's all for now. Glad to see the discussions still going about the pod. It's a tremendous support to us to be in touch with others using it, particularly since our endo is a little on the clueless side about it.



[QUOTE=Lizzy731;45496]Hi...I am so glad I found this thread! My daughter was diagnosed about 2 months ago and being a picky eater on the conventional 2 shot a day therapy has been hellish! She will be 3 in August.


2.) I have read that the PDM does not have to stay on her for the basal insulin but needs to be in a 2 foot radius for the bolus doses. If she does not have the PDM on her for the 2 hour period that she is in school (just 2 days a week starting September...I would let the teacher hold it), how will anyone know if the basal doses stop for some reason? Is the alarm on the pod or the PDM?

3.) I am a bit confused about the "every 3 day change". Does this mean that if I change the pod Monday night, I would change it again on Thursday or Wednesday night?

4.) Would you have to give her a bolus dose for a small snack under 15 grams of carbs. Her snack at school will be small and since it is a private school because she is only 3, there is no school nurse until she is in the school system at age 4. I was wondering if I would have to train the teacher as she has no experience with insulin pumps. She would be getting her snack at 11 AM and I would be picking her up at 11:30 so if anything, I could give her the bolus then (is this possible?).

Lizzy731
05-20-2007, 10:38 PM
Thank you for all your valuable information. I cannot wait to get my daughter on the pump!


We try to go for 3 days - no one advised us otherwise but I think that's probably bc our endo has no experience with the pod on little ones and our trainer from Insulet did not seem to be giving us her full attention. I have not found any issues during that 3rd day yet, but do keep a close eye to see if dosing requirements seem to go up.


Btw, I asked my nurse why it was neccesary to change it more often on kids and she said it was because childrens' immune systems act quicker to foreign bodies and it would attack the catheter causing it to clog, possibly.

Lorraine
05-21-2007, 10:58 AM
3 day issue - yes that seems consistent with what Kirsten said. Good to know - will continue to keep a close watch on it and certainly reconsider changing to 2 day. At the beginning we were changing 2 days because of mishaps. Since we hadn't been advised otherwise, I think I was trying to drag it out for Caleb's benefit - more time between the dreaded insertions - but as we have become more used to them, I don't think it would be as much of an issue.

Lorraine

Lizzy731
05-24-2007, 04:19 PM
I just had the meeting with the nutritionist about the carb counting in prep for the pump. It turns out my food log book came in handy because I don't have to go back for the second appt because I have already been carb counting! :D I have a question for you. She said that the omnipod's lowest basal rate is .05 per hour but the animas goes to the 100th's. Have you had an issue with this at night? In other words, does your son need a lower basal rate than .05 at any time? Also, I forgot to ask her...can you change the rate for the basal (can you give the increments every other hour instead of every hour?). I don't know if this will ever be necessary but I am just curious.

Thanks

Lorraine
05-24-2007, 06:33 PM
I cannot believe the timing of your question! Just this week, this has posed a problem for us and I can answer your questions as I have been addressing this with Insulet.

Pre-pump, Caleb would always come down overnight and wake with a great number - around 80. This was with only NPH and Novolog in the AM and a small Novolog with dinner. For this very reason, I questioned his early morning basal at training. The trainer told me - no problem, if that holds true with the pump, you can alternate a basal of zero and .05. I attempted to do that this week and could not - contacted Insulet - it's not possible!! The Omnipod will not allow you to program a zero basal and therefore you cannot use the "alternate" approach.

The Omnipod will allow for a temporary basal percentage reduction, however, this is not possible when the basal is set to the lowest increment of .05 - not mathematically possible based upon how the Omnipod is programmed. The only way to deliver zero is through a temporary basal rate of "OFF" which cannot be pre-scheduled and can only be at one rate. I used that last night and today. With 2 hours of no basal he woke at 80. Caleb actually had no basal bt 8AM and 3PM today and I made sure he had snacks so that he was getting some insulin in his system (I am told that you can get ketones even with low BS numbers if you don't have insulin in your system - this doesn't make a lot of sense to me bc I believe his body is producing the insulin to some extent, but I haven't pursued that issue further at this point). Even with zero basal he was going low. 1.5 hr post lunch he was 55 so clearly needs a big IC reduction even with no basal.

Interestingly enough we had our pump follow up meeting with the endo yesterday - right in the thick of this. As of yesterday I was being told that he might need to be taken off the pump. I, however, am completely committed to making this work whatever it takes bc his a1c was 6.4 and the thought of going back to injections is not something I want to think about right now. However, our clinic brought Caleb's case up at their weekly meeting and I got a call today that they would like to proceed with diluted insulin. As of yesterday this was not an option bc typically you have to mix the insulin yourself and it does not mix consistently so not a good treatment. However, there is apparently a pharmacy in New Haven that does the dilution and it is therefore much more reliable - I imagine there are others who do this besides the one in New Haven.

As an aside, my interactions with Insulet have been very positive as I have addressed this matter with them. The person I contacted called me back - which I did not expect as I thought he had answered my question - he had done some research that was helpful and proactively extended our trial period a week to allow us some time to develop a workaround. BTW - they have changed the trial period to 45 days from shipment (rather than 30 day) to allow for the time lag bt shipment and training.

sammysmom
05-24-2007, 08:07 PM
We used diluted insulin with sammy and mixed it ourselves...I actually prefered it that way.....I trust myself with my kids life, it really was not that hard......very easy instructions. It may sound intimidating but it really was a breeze to mix.....just my 2 cents on that issue.....

shannon

Kirsten
05-25-2007, 12:04 PM
Lorraine, thanks for sharing your experience. It hasn't been a problem for us, but by the time we started pumping Griffin's TDD was 7IU/day.

Lizzy, you can program basals around the clock in 30 minute increments, but, as Lorraine said, you cannot program 0 U/hour.

Kirsten

Lorraine
05-25-2007, 01:19 PM
We used diluted insulin with sammy and mixed it ourselves...I actually prefered it that way.....I trust myself with my kids life, it really was not that hard......very easy instructions. It may sound intimidating but it really was a breeze to mix.....just my 2 cents on that issue.....

shannon

That's good to know Shannon - so when you diluted it yourself you found that the insulin seemed to be delivered consistently to Sammy? The endo seemed to have significant concerns that it was very hard to achieve a proper distribtution based upon their experiences. For some reason I have visions of the pharmacy having some machine that will properly shake up the vial to make sure the mix is done well - maybe too much exposure to CSI on my part!:)

Lizzy731
05-25-2007, 02:24 PM
I cannot believe the timing of your question! Just this week, this has posed a problem for us and I can answer your questions as I have been addressing this with Insulet.

Pre-pump, Caleb would always come down overnight and wake with a great number - around 80. This was with only NPH and Novolog in the AM and a small Novolog with dinner. For this very reason, I questioned his early morning basal at training. The trainer told me - no problem, if that holds true with the pump, you can alternate a basal of zero and .05. I attempted to do that this week and could not - contacted Insulet - it's not possible!! The Omnipod will not allow you to program a zero basal and therefore you cannot use the "alternate" approach.

The Omnipod will allow for a temporary basal percentage reduction, however, this is not possible when the basal is set to the lowest increment of .05 - not mathematically possible based upon how the Omnipod is programmed. The only way to deliver zero is through a temporary basal rate of "OFF" which cannot be pre-scheduled and can only be at one rate. I used that last night and today. With 2 hours of no basal he woke at 80. Caleb actually had no basal bt 8AM and 3PM today and I made sure he had snacks so that he was getting some insulin in his system (I am told that you can get ketones even with low BS numbers if you don't have insulin in your system - this doesn't make a lot of sense to me bc I believe his body is producing the insulin to some extent, but I haven't pursued that issue further at this point). Even with zero basal he was going low. 1.5 hr post lunch he was 55 so clearly needs a big IC reduction even with no basal.

Interestingly enough we had our pump follow up meeting with the endo yesterday - right in the thick of this. As of yesterday I was being told that he might need to be taken off the pump. I, however, am completely committed to making this work whatever it takes bc his a1c was 6.4 and the thought of going back to injections is not something I want to think about right now. However, our clinic brought Caleb's case up at their weekly meeting and I got a call today that they would like to proceed with diluted insulin. As of yesterday this was not an option bc typically you have to mix the insulin yourself and it does not mix consistently so not a good treatment. However, there is apparently a pharmacy in New Haven that does the dilution and it is therefore much more reliable - I imagine there are others who do this besides the one in New Haven.

As an aside, my interactions with Insulet have been very positive as I have addressed this matter with them. The person I contacted called me back - which I did not expect as I thought he had answered my question - he had done some research that was helpful and proactively extended our trial period a week to allow us some time to develop a workaround. BTW - they have changed the trial period to 45 days from shipment (rather than 30 day) to allow for the time lag bt shipment and training.

Thanks so much for your information. I have a question for you. How high was Caleb's dose of NPH in the AM and dose of novolog dose in the am & pm? Bethany is on 8 units of NPH total per day and usually receives an average of 2 units a day of humalog (she receives shots twice a day).

sammysmom
05-25-2007, 02:33 PM
That's good to know Shannon - so when you diluted it yourself you found that the insulin seemed to be delivered consistently to Sammy? The endo seemed to have significant concerns that it was very hard to achieve a proper distribtution based upon their experiences. For some reason I have visions of the pharmacy having some machine that will properly shake up the vial to make sure the mix is done well - maybe too much exposure to CSI on my part!:)

We had no problem with the strength of the insulin. It was exactly how we wanted it. And another up side of doing it yourself is that you are the one there 24/7. You know when it is time to "up" the strength of the insulin. We used 9:1(9parts diluent, 1 part insulin, and so on).....and then he needed a little bit more so we did 8:2.......we knew when it was timem for 5:5....I would of hate to run to the pharmacy every time we needed a different strength.....Just mix up a batch (LABEL IT) roll the bottle to mix it and good to go. Humalog can be diluted and the company will supply you with everything that you need, the sterile vials, diluent.....all that stuff......honestly, I trust myself more than I do a pharmacist mixing it up for me!!! I know that some people have had trouble with the strength of the diluted insulin but we NEVER did. It was always predictable, (peaked when it was supposed to) for us......just my opinion on the issue...

shannon

Lorraine
05-25-2007, 05:02 PM
Thanks so much for your information. I have a question for you. How high was Caleb's dose of NPH in the AM and dose of novolog dose in the am & pm? Bethany is on 8 units of NPH total per day and usually receives an average of 2 units a day of humalog (she receives shots twice a day).

When he was approved for the pump he was on .5 Novolog and 2.5 NPH in the Am and .25 Novolog at dinner (or .50 if his number was high predinner).

Just after that we went on vacation and his numbers went crazy. Just before pumping he was 1 Novolog and 3.5 NPH and .75 Novolog predinner - I guess not much of a change and certainly looks like much less than your daughter. Nonetheless, his dosing is up to about 7 or 8 units a day - mostly to cover meals and he gets very little basal - less than 10% of TDD, which I understand to on the low side. It's very different dosing with just fast acting and I was very surprised that the .05 increment became an issue. It seemed so small to me.

Lizzy731
05-30-2007, 06:22 PM
Hello. Yes, we have been able to remove insulin from pods. I don't know if it's a practice omnipod approves of, but we do try to remove any extra insulin from the old pod.


How do you do this? Thanks.

Kirsten
05-30-2007, 08:52 PM
You can draw it up from the reservoir from where you fill the pod. Insulet told us about this, but it really wouldn't save us any money to do this, so we don't.

Kirsten

Lizzy731
05-30-2007, 09:43 PM
You can draw it up from the reservoir from where you fill the pod. Insulet told us about this, but it really wouldn't save us any money to do this, so we don't.

Kirsten


Thanks for the info, but why wouldn't it save you any money? Do you use most of the insulin in the pod? I am assuming based on the calculations that the nutritionist estimated that Bethany would only need < 20 units of the 85 and this would be a 65 unit waste. My insurance pays for the insulin but I am concerned they won't pay for the waste.

Kirsten
05-31-2007, 06:00 AM
Our prescription is for 2 vials of humalog/ month (a total of 2,000 IU). We have a $10 co-pay for insulin each month. We use 100 units every other day, which works out to around 1,500 units/ month, leaving us a bit of wiggle room for any pod problems.

Griffin's TDD is around 12 U/ day at this point. We have no problem getting 2 vials of humalog/ month. We also use a Novolog pen as a back-up for the pump and I have a prescription for insulin cartridges as well.

Kirsten

Lorraine
05-31-2007, 02:37 PM
We withdraw the insulin - after the new pod is on, I take the insulin out from the old and insert into the vial for next time - creates lots of bubbles so I don't withdraw and put in the current pod. I'm sure no one would approve of this. It definately limits waste. We are still using one of the two vials we originally got when he was diagnosed - no one would ever support this since you are supposed to throw out non-refridgerated insulin after 30 days. But we haven't had any issues and one of the books I have sites a study where insulin lost only 10% potency after 1 year at room temp.

We could easily get a refill every month - we actually do - and be fine. I have heard people say that insurance will not cover the cost of insulin in excess of the daily need simply to meet the pod's minimum requirement. But our prescription was for 2 vials a month on shots and the same with the pod(I was suprised when it was pointed out to me that each vial holds 1000 units). 2000 units covers the pods minimum with either 2 day or 3 day changes as Kirsten's math shows.

Lo

Lizzy731
05-31-2007, 09:16 PM
Our prescription is for 2 vials of humalog/ month (a total of 2,000 IU). We have a $10 co-pay for insulin each month. We use 100 units every other day, which works out to around 1,500 units/ month, leaving us a bit of wiggle room for any pod problems.

Griffin's TDD is around 12 U/ day at this point. We have no problem getting 2 vials of humalog/ month. We also use a Novolog pen as a back-up for the pump and I have a prescription for insulin cartridges as well.

Kirsten

Just out of curiosity, why are you going through 100 units every other day when I was told the pod only requires 85 units to activate? Do you find that you need to put extra insulin in the pod to help prevent pod failure? Thanks for the response.

Kirsten
06-01-2007, 07:06 AM
The rep told us (and we had some experience) that the pod might not activate using the minimum. This may have been corrected since we started. If the pod beeps after you add 85 IU, then you're good. If not you can still add a little more, but we've just gotten into the habit of loading 100 IU.

Kirsten

Lizzy731
06-01-2007, 08:52 AM
The rep told us (and we had some experience) that the pod might not activate using the minimum. This may have been corrected since we started. If the pod beeps after you add 85 IU, then you're good. If not you can still add a little more, but we've just gotten into the habit of loading 100 IU.

Kirsten

Thanks for the tips...I'll be sure to bring this up to the rep when we meet. I called my insurance co and they will pay for all the insulin (even the waste). I was shocked and pleasantly suprised.

Lizzy731
06-02-2007, 09:15 PM
Need HELP!! We are doing the saline trial and I put the pod on her at the nurse's office yesterday...no problems, it went well. I placed it on her lower back horizontally with the cathetar side away from the crack. I actually wanted to place it lower so her pull up would cover it but the nurse told me not to. Today I picked her up and when I put her down it got caught on my arm and the canula came out and the fabric adhesive ripped. I am a bit suprised that it came off so easily. It seems that the pod itself is not that securely attached to the adhesive strip. Well anyway, I wanted to know for those of you that attach it to the butt area, should it be lower on the butt so the pull up/underwear can cover it up? I didn't want to attach it to her stomach yet because I don't want her to get upset and see it before she gets used to wearing it. And does anyone have any tips about getting it to stay on even if the pod is moved or jerked a bit? We used IV prep and attached the pod after it dried (I read a post once that it should still be wet but the nurse said to wait until it dried). I put paper tape over the new one I attached but it doesn't seem secure. Incidentally...we used baby oil to remove it and it didn't hurt her too much.

Thanks much!

Lorraine
06-03-2007, 10:48 AM
We originally used the tush but had a couple pods get pulled off when pulling down pants to go to the bathroom and then found that going down slides was an issue too. We are putting it on his lower back ABOVE the waistline - not on the tush at all. It's worked very well for us and we have not had any come off accidentally as a result. It's still out of his way and seems less subject to colliding with things in general.

We were told by the trainer to wait for the IVprep to dry. Insulet rep said that's a mistake. Since we have put the pod on with the IVprep still wet, we have not had any adherence issues. A child in his class even tried to pull it off and it stayed on no problem.

Glad to hear baby oil works. I found that to not help at all.

At the beginning we found we were changing pods more frequently than we would have liked - never thought we would get to the three day mark. But since we've all gotten used to things, we have had few, if any, unplanned pod changes. I find now that when I rub any of my kids' backs, I anticipate a pod to be there, and am surprised by the two smooth, podless backs.

Lizzy731
06-03-2007, 02:23 PM
We originally used the tush but had a couple pods get pulled off when pulling down pants to go to the bathroom and then found that going down slides was an issue too. We are putting it on his lower back ABOVE the waistline - not on the tush at all. It's worked very well for us and we have not had any come off accidentally as a result. It's still out of his way and seems less subject to colliding with things in general.

We were told by the trainer to wait for the IVprep to dry. Insulet rep said that's a mistake. Since we have put the pod on with the IVprep still wet, we have not had any adherence issues. A child in his class even tried to pull it off and it stayed on no problem.

Glad to hear baby oil works. I found that to not help at all.

At the beginning we found we were changing pods more frequently than we would have liked - never thought we would get to the three day mark. But since we've all gotten used to things, we have had few, if any, unplanned pod changes. I find now that when I rub any of my kids' backs, I anticipate a pod to be there, and am surprised by the two smooth, podless backs.


Thanks much for your reply...I am going to try putting it on while IV prep is still wet. My nurse is a bit of a hot head so I am not going to mention it to her ;)

Btw, on the back there is very little fat so that is not an issue? It doesn't hurt him more?

Thanks again!

Lorraine
06-03-2007, 02:34 PM
There is definitely less fat on the back than the meaty tushie :), but our trainer specifically recommended this site. We point the cannula out like you do on the tush, and after I push the button for insertion I push the pod in a little to help it along while we wait for the "click" (recommended by our trainer). Also as recommended by our trainer, we place it slightly diagonally - mostly horizontal, but a little askew. Caleb seems to find the prick no more painful here than other spots and this is the spot where we've actually had a couple of insertions that he said didn't hurt at all.

Lizzy731
07-02-2007, 07:55 PM
TIP :I just want to say that I find that mastisol works VERY well! I find that just using IV prep eventually creates tears in the fabric and it it came off yesterday when she wasn't doing much physical activity. This is the 4th pod change and the fabric has not moved or torn or anything since I used mastisol this time.

fk_963_UK
10-19-2008, 03:06 PM
Its not exactly fair that its only in America I really want the omnipod but im on insulin injection shots and im getting really tired of it.. im only 13 years old

Tripper
10-23-2008, 09:30 PM
You're a tough dude, you'll find something. Europe has it's own products and there is one out there that will fit you. My heart goes out to you.

HOPEFULONE
10-29-2008, 09:17 PM
My daughter is patiently waiting to see if her insurance will approve her OmniPod! I'm so glad your son has had such great success with very few complaints. My daughter currently has a Paradigm pump and constantly has her tubing jerked she is very excited at the prospect of eliminating that factor. Please keep us posted on anything new you learn. Thanks! :)

Stacjean1
11-03-2008, 03:14 AM
What a great thread. I am so glad that I happened upon it! :)

My son is 6. He was dx over 2 years ago and is finally interested in "thinking" about a pump. He has a friend at school who is 7 and got one over the summer. His mother has raved about it.

My son and I have both been hesitant about the pump. I guess I just feel like I know and understand what we are doing now and the thought of introducing a whole new thing is scary - like when he was first dx. He is scared of "wearing a needle all the time". But between his friend and Nick Jonas, he is now interested. LOL

I have been reading some, but have really liked what I have heard about the OmniPod. My biggest concern at this point is that it doesn't seem like there is a lot of sites to place it. How do you keep rotating sites? It seems like the lower back, above the waist line and tummy are the only places to really go. Am I misunderstanding this?

I am going to report back to him tomorrow on what I have learned here and at the OmniPod site. He really likes the idea of having no tubing. He has told me that he worries about the tubing getting caught on something or being yanked on. I have worried about that too. He is really active and plays sports, too.

Thanks for all the sharing. It has been great!

http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g185/stacjean1/kids/IMG00206.jpg

Pauji5
11-06-2008, 08:37 PM
we've been on the Omnipod for 2 months and LOVE it. It really provides more freedom and no, the needle insertion does not hurt her.

I think it's more widely available in the US - we are in Chicago.

hmmmcormick
11-09-2008, 12:11 PM
Great, great thread! We are thinking about the omnipod, too. I have already sent for the demo kit. I was going to wait until January, when next endo.appt.is, but think I may contact dr's office sooner about starting the process. Thanks for all this valuable information.

vettechmomof2
11-17-2008, 09:24 PM
I have been reading some, but have really liked what I have heard about the OmniPod. My biggest concern at this point is that it doesn't seem like there is a lot of sites to place it. How do you keep rotating sites? It seems like the lower back, above the waist line and tummy are the only places to really go. Am I misunderstanding this?





My daughter is very petite and wears the pod on her belly(first placement ever), butt, arms and now the thighs as well. We rotate through all of those sites with no problems. We just pick a spot that she feels like having it at and that is where we put the new pod.
You can also do the lower back but we have not tried that one yet.
Any other questions just ask,
Allene

Becky505
06-27-2009, 11:56 PM
:)We too are new omnipod users. My son is 9 yrs old and been on the pump soon to be 2 weeks. We/he loves it so far. :)

DYoung
08-22-2009, 08:31 PM
One more note, for any of you hesitant about the omnipod because of pricing, etc. They do offer a 30 day trial on the omnipod. Each pod costs 30.00, the first controller is $800.00 additional controllers are $300.00.
Monthly omnipod cost is 10 pods x 30.00 = $300.00
They will work with people who have no insurance or limited coverage. Please keep in mind I am in S.E. Pennsylvania and I don't know if they offer the same thing everywhere the omnipod is available.

I am an adult diabetic who is already on an insulin pump. I am thinking about switching to omnipod and was looking up info on the internet and found this site. My question is was the 800.00 your potion of the cost or the total cost?

DYoung
08-22-2009, 08:36 PM
I am an adult diabetic who is already on an insulin pump who is thinking of switching to omnipod. I was looking up info on the internet and found this site. My question is was the $800.00 your cost or the total cost.